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A toilet already has a horn. A second horn in the wax can cause restriction and splashing. A closet auger can also knock them into the pipe or pull them into the toilet.
While I agree with you that a toilet has a horn, I use them depending on the situation. It depends on flange height. If the flange will engage with the horn, I usually won’t use a wax with a horn. If it doesn’t becuae like 3 layers of flooring are have dropped the flange, or if the flange wasn’t installed properly, (where it’s lower than it should be, the wax needs to have a horn.

I have never heard of a toilet auger grabbing one. But I am absolutely sure that it happens. Watch, the next time I auger a toilet, I’ll waste the horn and the wax, just becuae I said that.

Also, I usually won’t just auger a toilet; there are a bunch of reasons for that but the biggest is that I have had way way too many call backs with toilet augur jobs. Most of the time, I will auger, clear it and then pull the toilet to see what is going on. You’d be shocked how often I find stuff in the toilet after running an augur.
 

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Read the whole thread and you’ll see that others also have pulled the horns out of the wax.

I correct the flange if it’s not correct. Plastic horns inside the wax isn’t the answer for me. I also do not stack extension rings.

No code allows stacking pvc rings and sealing then together with silicone, yet some do it.

No way I’m pulling a toilet if I clear it and it flushes wads of paper once I’m done. That’s why I carry an auger.

I also do not camera a sewer after I cable it. Same difference.
 

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Pornstar, Service Plumber
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I use a standard wax ring unless there is something funky about the flange but not so bad as to make me replace the whole flange.

For instance, old ABS cracks easily, if it appears to be more than 30yrs old I will use a horn. Or if it's an all plastic flange, sometimes the toilet getting knocked will crack the flange, so I'll use a horned wax. If it's an inside solder or caulk flange I will use a horned wax so the joint stays dry to limit corrosion.

I've run into a handful of toilets with an integral horn that will interfere with a horned wax seal. Some toilet flanges such as offsets or internal compression rep[air flanges will also not accept a horned wax.

And yes, I too have occasionally pulled the horn out with my auger, never had it cause a leak though and I don't think it normally would.
 
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If I thought about using anything other than a standard or extra thick reinforced wax seal that would prompt me to correct the flange.

The horns can cause problems. Look at how it’s all put together. It can slip and slide and cause splashing when water hits the horn as the toilet flushes.

I don’t want anything between the outlet of the toilet and the big empty pipe below it……then I want the bottom of the toilet to seal with wax against the flange. There’s no need for an extra piece of plastic to accomplish this.

I have found the horns deformed and obstructing the pipe or toilet outlet.

It’s a hardware store gimmick item.

This is my opinion and I’m not judging others.
 
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