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Plumbing and Gas SCO
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OK, I am looking for opinions.

I have a customer on an acreage. His home is supplied by town water with a 1 1/2" PE line. This line runs at least a mile if not more. The customer is unsure how the line runs to his house as it was put in by the previous owner.

Normal town water pressure is 60psi and remains steady under use (2 sinks and tub).
His pressure is 60 psi standing and drops to 30 psi with 2 faucets running.

Town gpm is 8.83 through a hose bib.
His is 3.75 gpm through a bib.

WIth 2 faucets and a tub town gpm is 7.15
His with 2 faucets is 3.16.

There is also a subdivision of 6 houses being fed from the same main coming from town (size unknown). During heavy use times ( morning/evening) the customers water supply slows to a trickle. Obviously the water is following the path of least resistance and he gets the short end of the stick.

I am debating between adding a pump directly to his line to boost flow and pressure to his house, or adding a holding tank with a float switch and a on demand jet pump.

What advice or ideas do you have?
 

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Can you install an air bladder tank under his house with a check valve just before it maybe? No, this probably wont work as there is not enough pressure to fill the tank. maybe what you suggested, a storage tank with a pump. Either way install a check valve so the neighbors wont benefit from the added pressure.

sorry, I'll try again in the morning, too many #2's at dinner tonight!
 

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I would install a storage tank to fill during the off time when water is plentiful. You will also need a pump on a bladder which will only run when you need to supplement the water from the city source.

Mark
 

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I would install a storage tank to fill during the off time when water is plentiful. You will also need a pump on a bladder which will only run when you need to supplement the water from the city source.

Mark
Thats it, thats what I was thinking. Sort of the same as if it were in a well.
See what too many #2's will do:party:
 

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A booster pump on a municipal system may be against somebody's code - whether the city's or the state. Does the city collect a monthly bill, and do they have any responsibility to provide a sufficient amount of water to their customers?

Using the pump may provide a better water service for your customer, but it may also draw away what little the neighbors are getting.
 

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A booster pump on a municipal system may be against somebody's code - whether the city's or the state. Does the city collect a monthly bill, and do they have any responsibility to provide a sufficient amount of water to their customers?

Using the pump may provide a better water service for your customer, but it may also draw away what little the neighbors are getting.
I agree, Marks suggestion is the better, use a tank.
 

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A booster pump on a municipal system may be against somebody's code - whether the city's or the state. Does the city collect a monthly bill, and do they have any responsibility to provide a sufficient amount of water to their customers?

Using the pump may provide a better water service for your customer, but it may also draw away what little the neighbors are getting.
Use a booster system that incorporates a pump, a tank as well as a built in dual check, it protects the rest of those connected to the system as well as providing increased pressure to the HO.
 

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In my water company the minute you add a pump of any type you need to do something better than a dual-check. Our meters are already equipped with a dual-check on the meter yoke but I want to see an RP if a pump is installed.

Mark
 

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In my water company the minute you add a pump of any type you need to do something better than a dual-check. Our meters are already equipped with a dual-check on the meter yoke but I want to see an RP if a pump is installed.

Mark
The system we normally use has a testable dual check, but an RPZ is an option, though it is not required by Chicago code.
 

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The system we normally use has a testable dual check, but an RPZ is an option, though it is not required by Chicago code.
My water company is under the RWUA (Rural Water Association of Utah) which permits dual-checks at the meter. As much as I dislike dual-checks I am okay with them until you add a pump. Once you add a pump or chemical injection I require an RP.

Mark
 

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It's hit or miss here.Some city's have closed systems and some are not.Like you pointed out,you better know what the city is doing before messing with the system.
You know I was kidding about the gravity tank,right?
 

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You know I was kidding about the gravity tank,right?
Don't be too quick to discount gravity as I am a big fan of not paying for power. My entire water system is limited to a single 12volt piston driven pump for chlorination. Beyond that the whole thing is gravity fed for now. My spring and storage tank is at an elevation of 6,000 ft. That is higher than all of the buildable lots in our area. However, one lady just built a cabin which puts her almost right at 6,000 ft. As a consequence she has 40gpm to her cabin as long as no one else is drawing down the system but as soon as there is a large demand she drops to a trickle. Recently a water truck doing construction in our area took several 4,000 gallon tanks of water without asking and she was without water for a couple of hours.

Mark
 

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It is a viable alternative if you have space,for sure.I didn't mean to discount the idea but more so the practicallity on my many residential services.
 

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I agree with the bladder tank and pump idea. putting in a double check valve is also a smart thing . I would check with water purveyor to determine what they want for protection.
 

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A booster pump on a municipal system may be against somebody's code - whether the city's or the state. Does the city collect a monthly bill, and do they have any responsibility to provide a sufficient amount of water to their customers?

Using the pump may provide a better water service for your customer, but it may also draw away what little the neighbors are getting.
Herk, I dont see where the bladder and pump will affect the neighbors pressure much. I could be wrong though.
 

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Herk, I dont see where the bladder and pump will affect the neighbors pressure much. I could be wrong though.
Considering the area is already suffering from a problem with low flow, if you improve the customers water volume without the use of additional storage the water has to come from somewhere. That somewhere will likely be the neighbors house.

Mark
 
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