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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m bidding a job to run some underground water lines to a couple of cattle watering pads. What do you guys like to run for underground water service? This will be 5’ burial for Northern Illinois frost and the fact it’s under a gravel drive with heavy truck traffic. I was looking at the blue 250psi poly in CTS with brass compression fittings with about 6” of sand around it. I see upunor is rated for burial too? Appreciate it.

-Bryan
 

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We run black poly with brass insert fittings, either 200psi or 300psi rated. Two all stainless hose clamps on each fitting of course.
 

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That was another option I looked at. Does that hold up well long term?
Yup, been doing it that way for decades. That blue poly is the same stuff except different size. The black poly we use is ips. My house has 20yr+ old 150psi poly.

Uponor and other pex pipes are pretty much the same too, just slightly different molecule, hence the "x" after the "pe". Pex A has had some issues recently though.
 

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I’ve seen cheap stainless hose clamps fail. I quit using insert pipe a long time ago. We use CTS poly with pack joint couplings.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yup, been doing it that way for decades. That blue poly is the same stuff except different size. The black poly we use is ips. My house has 20yr+ old 150psi poly.

Uponor and other pex pipes are pretty much the same too, just slightly different molecule, hence the "x" after the "pe". Pex A has had some issues recently though.
Appreciate the info, I’ve mostly been on the commercial side and all we ever used was copper and mueller couplings.
 

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Appreciate the info, I’ve mostly been on the commercial side and all we ever used was copper and mueller couplings.
We still use K for main lines when it's city water. All the lines from wells are black poly. We use black poly for horse farms, estates, large private commercial properties, you name it. We never use cheap hose clamps either 😉 A couple years ago I worked with 2" insert fittings! I don't reccomend that. For 1-1/2" or less it's good.

Last summer our guys ran some preinsulated 3" uponor lines at a school for distributed steam, hot, cold, and chiller lines.

We occasionally do fusion weld and have the tools for 3 different types of thermoset brands. A couple years back we ran some 4" fusion weld for a country club.

You name the pipe we've run it underground. We still prefer black poly with brass/bronze insert fittings when running small lines underground.

Some well drillers use pvc if they run the line into the house. It's great when the pvc coming into the house gets snapped off because someone caught with their foot, stepped on it, or in one case the cat knocked over tote bins. We've seen several flooded basements because of incoming pvc well lines. Plastic insert fittings are dangerous too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We still use K for main lines when it's city water. All the lines from wells are black poly. We use black poly for horse farms, estates, large private commercial properties, you name it. We never use cheap hose clamps either 😉 A couple years ago I worked with 2" insert fittings! I don't reccomend that. For 1-1/2" or less it's good.

Last summer our guys ran some preinsulated 3" uponor lines at a school for distributed steam, hot, cold, and chiller lines.

We occasionally do fusion weld and have the tools for 3 different types of thermoset brands. A couple years back we ran some 4" fusion weld for a country club.

You name the pipe we've run it underground. We still prefer black poly with brass/bronze insert fittings when running small lines underground.

Some well drillers use pvc if they run the line into the house. It's great when the pvc coming into the house gets snapped off because someone caught with their foot, stepped on it, or in one case the cat knocked over tote bins. We've seen several flooded basements because of incoming pvc well lines. Plastic insert fittings are dangerous too.
Where do you get your heavy duty hose clamps for the barb fittings?
 

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Where do you get your heavy duty hose clamps for the barb fittings?
From our supply house. I don't recall the brand but they are the "87 series" made from marine grade stainless.
 
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Municipex 200psi PEX is all I run underground anymore. We had a trailer park that if we put brass insert fittings in then 5 months later they were leaking. Haven’t had that issue with corp. fittings.
 

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Municipex 200psi PEX is all I run underground anymore. We had a trailer park that if we put brass insert fittings in then 5 months later they were leaking. Haven’t had that issue with corp. fittings.
I don't ask this to be insulting, were you heating the poly to get the insett fittings in? Were you using pipe that was designed/sized to be used with insert fittings? Were the corporation fittings brass, bronze, or steel?



I've seen cheap pipe labeled for 200psi that was only as thick as the 100psi version of the brand we normally use. We use 200psi and 300psi black poly, the 300psi stuff is difficult to work with if you don't get it quite hot enough. The 100psi pipe almost doesn't need heat at all to push the fittings in.

If you put your hose clamps on right away you shouldn't have an issue. If you're burning the pipe or heating it too much that can cause leaks. If the pipe extrudes through the holes in the hose clamp, it's much hotter than it should be.

I am not implying you don't know this stuff, just thought it would be worth mentioning for the guys who haven't worked with insert fittings before.
 

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I don't ask this to be insulting, were you heating the poly to get the insett fittings in? Were you using pipe that was designed/sized to be used with insert fittings? Were the corporation fittings brass, bronze, or steel?



I've seen cheap pipe labeled for 200psi that was only as thick as the 100psi version of the brand we normally use. We use 200psi and 300psi black poly, the 300psi stuff is difficult to work with if you don't get it quite hot enough. The 100psi pipe almost doesn't need heat at all to push the fittings in.

If you put your hose clamps on right away you shouldn't have an issue. If you're burning the pipe or heating it too much that can cause leaks. If the pipe extrudes through the holes in the hose clamp, it's much hotter than it should be.

I am not implying you don't know this stuff, just thought it would be worth mentioning for the guys who haven't worked with insert fittings before.
I heat it until it just starts to get flexible not bubbling. it was 1” poly not CTS poly. It wasn’t the actual pipe that I had issues with. It was always the fittings. Didn’t matter whether I used stainless or brass. It would always eat through between the barb and poly.
 

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I heat it until it just starts to get flexible not bubbling. it was 1” poly not CTS poly. It wasn’t the actual pipe that I had issues with. It was always the fittings. Didn’t matter whether I used stainless or brass. It would always eat through between the barb and poly.
That's really weird. What were the Corporation fittings made from? If they were Bronze you probably had corrosive water and the Brass/Stainless couldn't take it. I'd question how long the Bronze will last.
 
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