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Journeyman
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152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are a small company that does residential and commercial construction and service plumbing. 7 of us.

We’ve currently got updated on information and safety training, ie. scissors lift, working from heights, confined space, whmis, uponor, victaulic.

I’m looking to add some training for my guys. Any recommendations?
 

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4th year apprentice
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693 Posts
You're going to have to be a lot more specific than that. For safety training OSHA 10 is a good general place to start, but it is an ongoing process, not just a one time thing.
 

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philosopher and statesmen
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7,840 Posts

good luck with this.... you are probably best to just go over the basics and not try to
make them sit though hours and hours of bull shi/.....
it will surly backfire on you......




130367
 

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Registered
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6,714 Posts
good luck with this.... you are probably best to just go over the basics and not try to
make them sit though hours and hours of bull shi/.....
it will surly backfire on you......
Exactly. Almost all of us have our OSHA 10 and 30. We hated it, did nothing to engender an air of safety to our daily routine. It was simply a legal practicality for the purposes of liability control. We do big jobs and work in facilities that require them. The only partly helpful "safety training" I have recieved was an MSHA class, and even that was way too long at 8hrs. The free pizza barely helped.

Your best bet is to make a list of all the hazards your employees usually face and write some easy ways to avoid these hazards.

-Angle Grinder and other tools that throw off pieces
-Leather gloves
-Safety glasses
-Concrete drill or other loud tools
-Ear hole plugs
-Digging
-Look around for possible buried gas or electric lines if digging by hand
-Call the appropriate utility services if digging with a machine
-Ladders
-Don't use an aluminum ladder near electricity
-Make sure the ladder extends well above the departure point
-Tie the ladder off to something to prevent it from falling away


A simple list like this, and asking your guys for scenarios that have happened to them, will do so much more than some bs OSHA course. Make sure your guys know you actually care about their safety, not that you're just trying to cover your azz.

"Shake Hands With Danger" is easily the best safety video/course I have come across. It's from the 70's(released in 1980), but still applies to almost everything we do.


Great song too!!!!

 

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Premium Member
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70 Posts
I've been a good 'employee' for years. Same owner. You've decided they're going to get some training. Ask them what they'd be interested in and why. Make sure they get it and follow up afterwards regularly.
 

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Master Plumber
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382 Posts
I’ve been sent to countless “trainings” for various products. More often than not it’s more of a sales pitch than an actual training. Don’t waste your time with training seminars, because most manufacturers have YouTube channels with videos that’s are short and to the point on how to install their products or use their equipment. I enjoy a pizza as much as the next guy but I’d rather buy it myself and enjoy it at home.
 

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Journeyman
Joined
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152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Exactly. Almost all of us have our OSHA 10 and 30. We hated it, did nothing to engender an air of safety to our daily routine. It was simply a legal practicality for the purposes of liability control. We do big jobs and work in facilities that require them. The only partly helpful "safety training" I have recieved was an MSHA class, and even that was way too long at 8hrs. The free pizza barely helped.

Your best bet is to make a list of all the hazards your employees usually face and write some easy ways to avoid these hazards.

-Angle Grinder and other tools that throw off pieces
-Leather gloves
-Safety glasses
-Concrete drill or other loud tools
-Ear hole plugs
-Digging
-Look around for possible buried gas or electric lines if digging by hand
-Call the appropriate utility services if digging with a machine
-Ladders
-Don't use an aluminum ladder near electricity
-Make sure the ladder extends well above the departure point
-Tie the ladder off to something to prevent it from falling away


A simple list like this, and asking your guys for scenarios that have happened to them, will do so much more than some bs OSHA course. Make sure your guys know you actually care about their safety, not that you're just trying to cover your azz.

"Shake Hands With Danger" is easily the best safety video/course I have come across. It's from the 70's(released in 1980), but still applies to almost everything we do.


Great song too!!!!

Thanks for this!
 

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Journeyman
Joined
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152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would like to see us keep up with what the union offers for safety and skill sets. I find just simple stuff like proper techniques on the simple things, ie, tinning and soldering big pipe, pump knowledge.. that sort of thing. thanks for advice
 

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Registered
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3 Posts
Exactly. Almost all of us have our OSHA 10 and 30. We hated it, did nothing to engender an air of safety to our daily routine. It was simply a legal practicality for the purposes of liability control. We do big jobs and work in facilities that require them. The only partly helpful "safety training" I have recieved was an MSHA class, and even that was way too long at 8hrs. The free pizza barely helped.

Your best bet is to make a list of all the hazards your employees usually face and write some easy ways to avoid these hazards.

-Angle Grinder and other tools that throw off pieces
-Leather gloves
-Safety glasses
-Concrete drill or other loud tools
-Ear hole plugs
-Digging
-Look around for possible buried gas or electric lines if digging by hand
-Call the appropriate utility services if digging with a machine
-Ladders
-Don't use an aluminum ladder near electricity
-Make sure the ladder extends well above the departure point
-Tie the ladder off to something to prevent it from falling away


A simple list like this, and asking your guys for scenarios that have happened to them, will do so much more than some bs OSHA course. Make sure your guys know you actually care about their safety, not that you're just trying to cover your azz.

"Shake Hands With Danger" is easily the best safety video/course I have come across. It's from the 70's(released in 1980), but still applies to almost everything we do.


Great song too!!!!

Thanks for sharing this
 
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