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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just a reminder to be careful out there.

A worker from an H.V.A.C. contractor I know was working at a residence. They were working on a condensing unit. They plugged into a receptacle on a screened in porch (three plug) in an older home. Ran the cord outside on wet ground and connected their equipment.

When the worker started to use it he was electrocuted. I am working with an attorney as a professional consultant to determine fault for a wrongful death lawsuit.

The loss of life of course is the worst. The guy had a family. I have to determine if the location of the receptacle was in an area that "required" a G.F.C.I. protected receptacle or not. If not fault would lie with the worker for using an unprotected circuit outside where G.F.C.I. protection is required.

Depending on the age of the dwelling would a G.F.C.I receptacle been required when the dwelling was constructed at that location. If so the owner may be held responsible. Now add an adopted ordinance for "property maintenance" (after the original construction date) may kick in even if the original construction would not require G.F.C.I. protection and mandate one should have been installed.

Loss of life, massive monetary amounts may be incurred by home owner and remodel contractor. Not to mention a family who lost a loved one & Dad.

All this could have been avoided if the worker had been instructed by his company to "TEST" any receptacle he intended to use with a $5.00 circuit tester to see if it was wired correctly and had a functional G.F.C.I. before he used it.

Guys, please buy your employees and yourself a tester capable of testing for G.F.C.I. circuits and mandate they use it every time prior to plugging into a circuit and operating equipment. It takes less then 5 seconds. Also remember for an older "two wire" circuit a G.F.C.I. receptacle is allowed by code to be installed. It "will not trip" with a G.F.C.I. tester but it will still trip should a ground fault occur. You just have to be able to recognize the G.F.C.I. receptacle or breaker and confirm it is on the circuit you intend to use. You can then trip it with the integral trip button to verify it will trip.
 

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Just a reminder to be careful out there.

A worker from an H.V.A.C. contractor I know was working at a residence. They were working on a condensing unit. They plugged into a receptacle on a screened in porch (three plug) in an older home. Ran the cord outside on wet ground and connected their equipment.

When the worker started to use it he was electrocuted. I am working with an attorney as a professional consultant to determine fault for a wrongful death lawsuit.

The loss of life of course is the worst. The guy had a family. I have to determine if the location of the receptacle was in an area that "required" a G.F.C.I. protected receptacle or not. If not fault would lie with the worker for using an unprotected circuit outside where G.F.C.I. protection is required.

Depending on the age of the dwelling would a G.F.C.I receptacle been required when the dwelling was constructed at that location. If so the owner may be held responsible. Now add an adopted ordinance for "property maintenance" (after the original construction date) may kick in even if the original construction would not require G.F.C.I. protection and mandate one should have been installed.

Loss of life, massive monetary amounts may be incurred by home owner and remodel contractor. Not to mention a family who lost a loved one & Dad.

All this could have been avoided if the worker had been instructed by his company to "TEST" any receptacle he intended to use with a $5.00 circuit tester to see if it was wired correctly and had a functional G.F.C.I. before he used it.

Guys, please buy your employees and yourself a tester capable of testing for G.F.C.I. circuits and mandate they use it every time prior to plugging into a circuit and operating equipment. It takes less then 5 seconds. Also remember for an older "two wire" circuit a G.F.C.I. receptacle is allowed by code to be installed. It "will not trip" with a G.F.C.I. tester but it will still trip should a ground fault occur. You just have to be able to recognize the G.F.C.I. receptacle or breaker and confirm it is on the circuit you intend to use. You can then trip it with the integral trip button to verify it will trip.

I say its the responsibility of a worker to determine what is safe or not safe for powering equipment, and should carry or have a gfci extension cord if they are not sure...
to blame a homeowner would not be proper unless the homeowner stated that the outlet was safe and up to code..
the blood sucking lawyers will go after everyone..
while tragic for the worker you have to stop blaming everyone else for ones own responsibility ..
I carry an voltage tester because I dont trust anyone that says the powers off when working on any electric to hook up a boiler, dishwasher or garbage disposal ...
 

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Presumably he died when the water on the cord conducted from the neutral side to him? The neutral only being energized when he pulled the trigger.







.
 
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im thinking about frying myself and suing the homeowner. then i can retire early. any pros or cons to this?:wink:



The biggest con is your hand or whichever part of your body you use might not be good for a while so make sure to use your left hand if you're a righty so you can steal sign the court papers and jerkoff, don't wanna be stuck in a hospital bed with a stiffy and nothin to do about it.



It's also a good idea to use some real thin gauge wire to limit the voltage to about 48v or less when under load, this way you probably won't die.




I used to run this scam among others but had to skip town. I'm all on the up and up now!! Worked every time though :smile:






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Discussion Starter #8
Yep we know how the blood sucking attorneys make their cash.

When I was still out if any equipment didn't have built in protection either a GFCI pigtail or direct plug was used when outside. we may not have used one on a concrete floor, which of course your a lot safer on unless wet.

The angle of the home owner right or wrong would be based on their responsibility to maintain there dwelling in compliance of adopted ordinances, whether they knew it or not. You know ignorance of the law is no excuse.

The whole thing to me is sad but nuts. Home owners are usually dumb unless they are in the trades. Off hand to me the workers as a professional failed to verify his own safety via being lazy, improper training, etc.
 
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Yep we know how the blood sucking attorneys make their cash.

When I was still out if any equipment didn't have built in protection either a GFCI pigtail or direct plug was used when outside. we may not have used one on a concrete floor, which of course your a lot safer on unless wet.

The angle of the home owner right or wrong would be based on their responsibility to maintain there dwelling in compliance of adopted ordinances, whether they knew it or not. You know ignorance of the law is no excuse.

The whole thing to me is sad but nuts. Home owners are usually dumb unless they are in the trades. Off hand to me the workers as a professional failed to verify his own safety via being lazy, improper training, etc.
thats like blaming the car for a drunken driver that crashes....
 

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Yep we know how the blood sucking attorneys make their cash.

When I was still out if any equipment didn't have built in protection either a GFCI pigtail or direct plug was used when outside. we may not have used one on a concrete floor, which of course your a lot safer on unless wet.

The angle of the home owner right or wrong would be based on their responsibility to maintain there dwelling in compliance of adopted ordinances, whether they knew it or not. You know ignorance of the law is no excuse.

The whole thing to me is sad but nuts. Home owners are usually dumb unless they are in the trades. Off hand to me the workers as a professional failed to verify his own safety via being lazy, improper training, etc.



Gfci or not if that outlet was properly wired than the homeowner doesn't deserve to be sued. I don't know this poor fella that died and if he was smart or not, but I do know that using a wet electrical cord is dumb and he seems to have accidentally killed himself.



If someone is in the trades and is using power tools and extension cords than they should know basic electrical safety.



It's an accident that occurred on the job than his employers insurance should make the pay out.






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I say its the responsibility of a worker to determine what is safe or not safe for powering equipment, and should carry or have a gfci extension cord if they are not sure...
to blame a homeowner would not be proper unless the homeowner stated that the outlet was safe and up to code..
the blood sucking lawyers will go after everyone..
while tragic for the worker you have to stop blaming everyone else for ones own responsibility ..
I carry an voltage tester because I dont trust anyone that says the powers off when working on any electric to hook up a boiler, dishwasher or garbage disposal .

I suspect part of the problem in this country is the legal team accessing risk management under the guise of safety.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thats like blaming the car for a drunken driver that crashes....
Not quite.

That is like blaming the driver of the car (not drunk) for not maintaining his cars wheel when it comes off and his vehicle crashes into another car.
 
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Discussion Starter #13





Gfci or not if that outlet was properly wired than the homeowner doesn't deserve to be sued. I don't know this poor fella that died and if he was smart or not, but I do know that using a wet electrical cord is dumb and he seems to have accidentally killed himself.



If someone is in the trades and is using power tools and extension cords than they should know basic electrical safety.



It's an accident that occurred on the job than his employers insurance should make the pay out.

.
Yep. I'm sure the workers compensation paid out. Not sure where the suit is coming from. The workers family may be attempting a wrongful death or the workers comp company may be going after the owner or other contractors who were working on a "remodel" aspect around the same time.

Think of our aspect. A plumber causes a cross connection which poisons someone, screws up a gas line and causes and explosion, improperly secures cast iron which falls and kills someone. The contractor gets sued and for those who have gone through this the attorney brings in everyone who was working or had interest in the job or site. If anyone aspect found against the case is won.

An attorney usually doesn't just go after a single entity (which is bull****). Installers, makers, maintenance crews, owners, etc.
 

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Yep. I'm sure the workers compensation paid out. Not sure where the suit is coming from. The workers family may be attempting a wrongful death or the workers comp company may be going after the owner or other contractors who were working on a "remodel" aspect around the same time.

Think of our aspect. A plumber causes a cross connection which poisons someone, screws up a gas line and causes and explosion, improperly secures cast iron which falls and kills someone. The contractor gets sued and for those who have gone through this the attorney brings in everyone who was working or had interest in the job or site. If anyone aspect found against the case is won.

An attorney usually doesn't just go after a single entity (which is bull****). Installers, makers, maintenance crews, owners, etc.
Its called a SHOTGUN maybe the one person or company at fault doe's
not have that much Insurance but maybe you do so that is someone else
they can collect from :sad2:
 

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I broke an old school light bulb with my head... then proceeded to hit the electrodes after that with my head again needless to say it got crispy for a second...


I'm sad to admit I'm one of those dumb asses... Its not the first time Ive zapped myself either....
 

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I broke an old school light bulb with my head... then proceeded to hit the electrodes after that with my head again needless to say it got crispy for a second...


I'm sad to admit I'm one of those dumb asses... Its not the first time Ive zapped myself either....



I have hit my head against all three types, incandescent, cfl, and led. None of them are pleasant. Luckily never been cut or electrocuted from them, just burned.




I tell ya, if you install a base down led base up, those phuckers get hot!!!! And it's an aluminum heat sink so it burns more than glass. :vs_mad:







.
 
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