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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Installed some CSST (Corrugated Stainless Steel) gas pipe supplied by the owner. Because every brand has a little bit of different requirements, I actually read the instructions.

One of the statements regarding the nut that assembles the pipe to the fitting was, "Tighten to 60 ft.lbs". Does anyone carry an open end torque wrench with their regular every day tools? Or,something else that a plumber could possibly use to measure the torque on the type of fittings that we put together. I used two pair of channel locks and had a difficult time as it was due to the angle and the position of the piping , but that is nothing new. I googled it and I see that they are available, but have never seen one in a store or anyone using one.

I guess the engineers that write these specs just assume that every tradesman is carrying around a set of open end torque wrenches. I am used to " install hand tight, and then another 1/2 (or full turn or two turns ) with a wrench" and I've always followed the practice of tightening enough to prevent leaks but not enough to cause damage, but a torque wrench for plumbing connections.? I know companion flanges and other nut and bolt arrangements could/should be torqued, but compression nuts,flare fittings nuts, and now gas fitting nuts??

Gotta buy a bigger tool bag!!
 

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Reverend, R.S.E., Master Plumber
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I crack it down by hand, hand tight. no one has ever come behind me checking for torque. And Esp not for this price! Torquing Gear clamps is prob some kind of conspiracy, where is Shtrunsdown?
I worked with a guy who was anal about torquing MJ’s/ferncos, that guy needed to calm down, he was raging like richard bull.

129421
 

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Our HVAC guys have a couple full sets of the yellow jacket torque wrench set, mainly used for flare fittings on split systems. No one uses a torque wrench on those csst fittings lolz.
 

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Lift Station Whisperer
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You can use a crow's foot on a standard torque wrench, but there's a bit of math involved since it changes the fulcrum of the wrench handle. 🤓

And yes, I'm one of those guys that puts the no hub wrench on every no-hub/fernco/husky band I use. 😎👍
 

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Reverend, R.S.E., Master Plumber
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THANK YOU!!! Exactly what I am talking about.
Regarding the no hub torque wrench; we used to torque the band down with it and then use a socket wrench to make it tight.
Why would you torque it down with a TW, then go the extra step to tighten it with a socket wrench? Isn’t that the whole point of the torque wrench?
 

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4th year apprentice
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I guess the engineers that write these specs just assume that every tradesman is carrying around a set of open end torque wrenches. I am used to " install hand tight, and then another 1/2 (or full turn or two turns ) with a wrench" and I've always followed the practice of tightening enough to prevent leaks but not enough to cause damage, but a torque wrench for plumbing connections.? I know companion flanges and other nut and bolt arrangements could/should be torqued, but compression nuts,flare fittings nuts, and now gas fitting nuts??
What you are missing is that the engineers who design this stuff don't assume or care what tools we have or need, nor how much they cost or how available they are. It isn't their problem. Since gas is such a serious life safety and property issue they are simply covering their a$$es. "Make it tight enough but not too tight" is vague and subjective, and open for interpretation, at least according to the law. When they caluculate a value that can be measured it takes any guesswork out of it, and now puts the liability on the installer to ensure that the fittings have been tightened to that exact degree. If it ever fails, your fault, their fault, nobody's fault, you are the one who gets the blame unless you can demonstrate that you used a calibrated torque wrench and installed to their specs. They are almost banking that a lot of guys won't do it. Since anything to do with gas has an inherent risk they are doing everything they can to reduce their liability.
 

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What you are missing is that the engineers who design this stuff don't assume or care what tools we have or need, nor how much they cost or how available they are. It isn't their problem. Since gas is such a serious life safety and property issue they are simply covering their a$$es. ............

I think you should be blaming the money hungry azzholes who run the corporations. When has an Engineer at a company ever been held personally liable for something like this? It's the guys in the legal department who decide this is how it has to be for liability.
 
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