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residential service
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm tired so I'm making this quick. Ho reports builder (5 yrs ago) in an effort to remove ground water that was flooding basement, decided to drill holes in the ejector pit so that the water would drain into the pit and be pumped into the sanitary drainage system. 5 yrs later the ho is left with a stench from the downstairs bathroom which also discharges into the same ejector pit. He has 5 years worth of effluent that has run through his slab and is surfacing next to his garage door. Now of course the so called builder should be strung up by his nads for doing such an idiotic thing but that wouldn't help the ho.

Here is the plan so far: leave the existing pit to continue dealing with the ground water issue. Cut, break concrete, and excavate to install another ejector pit right next to the existing one, intercept the bathroom drain and redirect to the new pit, pipe as necessary.

This should correct the problem for the future but does nothing for the filth under the slab (who knows what is growing under there). I'm not really sure what to do about this but I'm wondering how well it might work to simply disconnect the pump temporarily and add some high doses of bio"stuff" to the pit periodically in hopes that it will work its way through the slab disposing of all the organic matter it encounters over time. This of course will not work very well during the rainy season (now) because the natural flow will be into the compromised ejector pit but in a few months when it dries out, might this work. I don't know what the alternative could possibly be.

Anybody have any experience and or ideas on this?
 

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Water Whisperer
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3,627 Posts
Call the EPA and have them declare it a Toxic Waste Dump.

Actually, it's probably inhabitable. You should really check that out.
 

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Professional Bullshioter
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6,092 Posts
Para1,

Some genius drilled holes in the sewage pit to let in ground water.

I'm ASSuming when ground water wasn't running into the pit sewage was flowing out into the sub-slab drainage rock.

Yum yum. There is no way this place should have a certificate of occupancy. I hope whoever drilled the holes has some good insurance.
 

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843 Posts
I can't imagine anyone doing such a thing, but if they did, one would think they'd drill the holes above the high water line in the pit, not low enough for the sewage to run out before the pit fills. In that case, there wouldn't really be any sewage under the slab unless it was coming from somewhere else. (I did replace a sump that had cracked upon installation by others and nobody suggested declaring the home a toxic waste dump.)
 

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residential service
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Discussion Starter #7
If I cut this slab open and excavate for another ejector pit, are there any special precautions I need to take? Can I just dump the dirt and gravel in the backyard or does it require some special means of disposal? Would I be exposing myself to anything more dangerous than say, cabling your garden variety main line?
 

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Water Whisperer
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3,627 Posts
If I cut this slab open and excavate for another ejector pit, are there any special precautions I need to take? Can I just dump the dirt and gravel in the backyard or does it require some special means of disposal? Would I be exposing myself to anything more dangerous than say, cabling your garden variety main line?
Lawyers are already involved, aren't they? If so, call the EPA and get instructions on disposal and remember to mark-up your costs.

If no lawyers, you still want to show some class and dispose of it off-site.

Protect yourself from contaminants, of course. In the old days, we play footloose and plain stupid and many of us have heath problems now. :eek:
 

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new nickname:Quaker State
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1,204 Posts
Yea. Think of what all the lead may have done to the old plumbers of the past. Not to mention smoke from solder and flux. Lucky for us today we have glue fumes. Just what harm can that do to your lungs and in open wounds.:detective:
 

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www.DunbarPlumbing.com
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5,478 Posts
Last person to touch it, owns it.

It's ground contamination all the way and "interested" parties is the best route to go.

Bad situation all around and the builder I'm sure will get a lawyer to fight it, their word against his.

If homeowners can prove he did it, he's on the hook, someone needs to contact his insurance carrier.
 
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