Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type do you keep with you even knowing you may not use it much.

I try to keep taps for mip adapters. Do not use them much, but had a few times when after the drywall was finished and cross threaded a nipple. Comes in handy.

Also I have added a pipe extractor I guess you call it. Fits on a drill and runs pvc pipe out of the hub.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
I carry a couple of taps for closet bolts, get some cast flanges that the bolts will just break off from trying you remove them, drill it out just a tad smaller and re-tap it, install new bolts, and ready to set the toilet.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
I carry a complete tap and die set, metric up to 13mm and standard up to 1/2 coarse and fine.

I carry a complete set of pipe taps from 1/8" to 2", with matching dies.

I have a complete set of caulking irons for packing lead joints, including offset irons, and running ropes for up to 15" CI.

For a some reason that I really can't think of I carry my little tool box with all the tools needed for wiping lead water service joints, complete with turnpins, a shave hook, wiping cloths and candles, and a two inch ladle.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
I do carry a 1-1/2 Pipe Tap, to chase the thread on a rusty durham tapped tee.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
Trouble with a dog or two eh?
 

·
J. McCabe Plumbing Inc.
Joined
·
409 Posts
I learned a trick from an old Dutch plumber friend of mine about 25 years ago. He would cross cut, about 1/2-3/4", down into the end of a 6" long steel nipple. The cut nipple then acts like a pipe tap, as the nipple is allowed to collapse a little and the sharp edges of the cuts clean out the tapped durham thread. Works great so I usually carry a 2" and a 1-1/2" at all times. Cheap too!
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I learned a trick from an old Dutch plumber friend of mine about 25 years ago. He would cross cut, about 1/2-3/4", down into the end of a 6" long steel nipple. The cut nipple then acts like a pipe tap, as the nipple is allowed to collapse a little and the sharp edges of the cuts clean out the tapped durham thread. Works great so I usually carry a 2" and a 1-1/2" at all times. Cheap too!
I forgot about that! i remember doing it myself. Thanks for reminding me
 

·
Ridgid tool user
Joined
·
4,909 Posts
Dremel but it has become one of my most used tools. I use it for just about anything-cutting off flange bolt, removing pex crimp ring, cutting off soldered angle stops, making grilled cheese sandwiches, etc.
 

·
Ridgid tool user
Joined
·
4,909 Posts
I learned a trick from an old Dutch plumber friend of mine about 25 years ago. He would cross cut, about 1/2-3/4", down into the end of a 6" long steel nipple. The cut nipple then acts like a pipe tap, as the nipple is allowed to collapse a little and the sharp edges of the cuts clean out the tapped durham thread. Works great so I usually carry a 2" and a 1-1/2" at all times. Cheap too!
So the cut end is the threaded part?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
I consider many of my tools specialty tools.The cameras,line locators and leak locators,gas sniffers etc.Even the tubing -cutter dedicated for csst,all the cartridge and stem removal removal tools etc.
That is why I love plumbing and gas so much,the jobs are rarely ever alike,and your constantly using different tools and varying techniques.:thumbup:.
Even the ratchet snap-cutters are a specialty tool.How many have used the old scissor type of cutter.It rattles every fiber of your body snapping 6'' iron.I know Killer,you use the hydraulic type,you spoiled brat!:laughing:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
I consider many of my tools specialty tools.The cameras,line locators and leak locators,gas sniffers etc.Even the tubing -cutter dedicated for csst,all the cartridge and stem removal removal tools etc.
That is why I love plumbing and gas so much,the jobs are rarely ever alike,and your constantly using different tools and varying techniques.:thumbup:.
Even the ratchet snap-cutters are a specialty tool.How many have used the old scissor type of cutter.It rattles every fiber of your body snapping 6'' iron.I know Killer,you use the hydraulic type,you spoiled brat!:laughing:
I do not have a hydraulic snap cutter.

I've priced them though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
[QUOTE"A Good Plumber"] He would cross cut, about 1/2-3/4", down into the end of a 6" long steel nipple. [/QUOTE]

I've done that, too. I remember having to put plugs in some commercial drains when the streets were flooding and the threads weren't very good. They were three inch rather than the usual two inch and I cut the end of the thread to use it like a tap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
The way I see it, 90% of a plumber's tools will be specialty...

I carry many tools the other 15 plumbers I work with do not.


compound-leverage pipe wrench

jet swet

ram bits

manometer

mini recriprocating saw attachment for dremel.

electric shear

4.5 inch tube cutters

Water heater handles

compression sleve puller


Many others too... I try to keep any tool I may need on my van. Last thing I want is to screw up a job or tell the customer I am not equipped to handle the problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
The way I see it, 90% of a plumber's tools will be specialty...

I carry many tools the other 15 plumbers I work with do not.


compound-leverage pipe wrench

jet swet

ram bits

manometer

mini recriprocating saw attachment for dremel.

electric shear

4.5 inch tube cutters

Water heater handles

compression sleve puller


Many others too... I try to keep any tool I may need on my van. Last thing I want is to screw up a job or tell the customer I am not equipped to handle the problem.
Yeah,what he said!:laughing:
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top