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Can you actually Eat Porkupine?? Some folks
down 150 miles south of us consider possum good to eat but seriously
I would have to be awfully hungry


yes for real, you can eat it, I havnt yet, but I have been told its not bad tasting..but everyones taste is different..so be guided by that..I like the taste of venison, but many dont..or its mind over matter..

What does porcupine meat taste like?




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Dan Hunter



, Just an old guy who has been cooking his own meals since he was a kid.
Answered May 21, 2018 · Author has 5.9K answers and 3.4M answer views






Originally Answered: Have you ever eaten porcupine? How did it taste?
Porcupines are like emergency food in a lot of Canada’s forests. They are slow moving and easy to kill with a club. So you should not kill them because unless the damn things are eating your house (They love eating plywood) they are mostly harmless.
OK, about the meat. There is a reason they are called porcupine. It is a poor translation of the French for “little spiny pig up a tree.”
The meat is much like pork, sweet, succulent, rich. It can be a bit fatty at times and if the porkies are eating pine instead of hemlock or poplar there might be a bit of pine taste (like a hint of turpentine) so don’t eat the ones that are eating pine trees.
 

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Can you actually Eat Porkupine?? Some folks
down 150 miles south of us consider possum good to eat but seriously
I would have to be awfully hungry


Why wouldn't you be able to eat it? You can eat most of the little fury animals. Usually most little animals are dry though, not much fat. Like shtrns posted, porcupines, and other slower moving animals get a good amount of fat. I hear skunk can be great if you slaughter it carefully.


The only animals I would prefer not to eat are racoons, opossums, and skunks. Racoons and opossums eat the most disgusting things there are so they're more likely to be real dirty. Just like you wouldn't like to eat porcupines that are eating pine wood, I can assure you from personal experience that you won't want to eat squirrels that live near black walnut trees. Also avoid the pregnant animals.


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yes for real, you can eat it, I havnt yet, but I have been told its not bad tasting..but everyones taste is different..so be guided by that..I like the taste of venison, but many dont..or its mind over matter..

What does porcupine meat taste like?




8 Answers













Dan Hunter



, Just an old guy who has been cooking his own meals since he was a kid.
Answered May 21, 2018 · Author has 5.9K answers and 3.4M answer views






Originally Answered: Have you ever eaten porcupine? How did it taste?
Porcupines are like emergency food in a lot of Canada’s forests. They are slow moving and easy to kill with a club. So you should not kill them because unless the damn things are eating your house (They love eating plywood) they are mostly harmless.
OK, about the meat. There is a reason they are called porcupine. It is a poor translation of the French for “little spiny pig up a tree.”
The meat is much like pork, sweet, succulent, rich. It can be a bit fatty at times and if the porkies are eating pine instead of hemlock or poplar there might be a bit of pine taste (like a hint of turpentine) so don’t eat the ones that are eating pine trees.
I tried it and black bear years ago. I think I was sixteen. The bear was greasy. Beaver is tasty though.
 

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I tried it and black bear years ago. I think I was sixteen. The bear was greasy. Beaver is tasty though.



Couldn't agree more :biggrin:




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I tried it and black bear years ago. I think I was sixteen. The bear was greasy. Beaver is tasty though.

LOL...skoso went there already....


bear if not cooked right is very fatty......its all in the cooking that makes or breaks wild game, cook it wrong and its uneatable, cook it right and its easy eating...
 

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Why wouldn't you be able to eat it? You can eat most of the little fury animals. Usually most little animals are dry though, not much fat. Like shtrns posted, porcupines, and other slower moving animals get a good amount of fat. I hear skunk can be great if you slaughter it carefully.


The only animals I would prefer not to eat are racoons, opossums, and skunks. Racoons and opossums eat the most disgusting things there are so they're more likely to be real dirty. Just like you wouldn't like to eat porcupines that are eating pine wood, I can assure you from personal experience that you won't want to eat squirrels that live near black walnut trees. Also avoid the pregnant animals.


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as with many things..location location location....animals out in the wild eat mostly fresh vegetation and wild fruits and berries and taste rather well, compared to the urban animals that eat everyones trash and garbage..
and yes what they eat in the wild can taint the meat, as you are what you eat...but most of the time if tasty food is around they will eat that over bad tasting foods...
spring is the worse time to eat any wild animals as the winter limited their food supply, unless they live in areas that dont have reduced food in winter..
 

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..... compared to the urban animals that eat everyones trash and garbage....

I question if I would even want to eat a bear from around here. They are constantly getting into peoples garbage. My neighbor had trash bags pulled from their dumpster three times in the past month.

And racoons and opossums eat dead animals. It's not their meat that worries me, it's all the bugs and nasty schit in their fur. Also rabies is a thing. On the other hand, rabbits, squirrels, and chipmunks almost never get rabies.


The north american hairless beaver is my favorite game though :wink: Doesn't even have to be hairless, with my moustache I can't tell. :vs_laugh:


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I question if I would even want to eat a bear from around here. They are constantly getting into peoples garbage. My neighbor had trash bags pulled from their dumpster three times in the past month.

And racoons and opossums eat dead animals. It's not their meat that worries me, it's all the bugs and nasty schit in their fur. Also rabies is a thing. On the other hand, rabbits, squirrels, and chipmunks almost never get rabies.


The north american hairless beaver is my favorite game though :wink: Doesn't even have to be hairless, with my moustache I can't tell. :vs_laugh:


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there are multiple answers to your statement....I guess the bottom line is..how hungry you are....
different times call for different thinking....
if you have an abundance of food in stores then you can cherry pick what wild game you want to consume, when the store shelves are empty, your stomach will dictate what you eat...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Site isn’t letting me upload pictures. Had a good, other than my truck battery dieing! Got the gas line ran. One of the tanks leaked from the rebuilt valve, basically the packing nut when turned on. I’ll have to get with my lp guy to see if there’s a trick.

Haven’t cooked up the porcupine yet. Figured I’d get home to look up a recipe before ruining the meat.

I’ve had cat and dog overseas, raccoon when I was younger, squirrel, rabbit, and all the normal game. Coon was pretty greasy if I remember right. I’ve also heard opossum is really good, but sorry, once you see one crawl out of a dead deer’s azz, it kinda puts an image in your mind. Kinda like when you watch a show about what tilapia eats and is raised.

Lots of time around the bonfire, lots of card games, no cell or internet service, carved 6 cool walking sticks, took the kid to the local crystal clear lake for some swimming.

I have a post to make in the brewing forum too.
 

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....One of the tanks leaked from the rebuilt valve, basically the packing nut when turned on. I’ll have to get with my lp guy to see if there’s a trick.....
It's a regular packing nut on a globe valve right? Just close the valve, take the nut off, maybe handle first, and wrap some teflon tape around the stem and put the nut back on. Doesn't hurt to use some pipe dope too. I usually twist the tape into a strand first. Granted it won't stand up to repeated use like real graphite and asbestos packing but it's fine for that old valve you don't want to change right now and can just leave open or closed most of the time.

I've never done it on propane but it works great on water and higher pressure air(~200psi).

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It's a regular packing nut on a globe valve right? Just close the valve, take the nut off, maybe handle first, and wrap some teflon tape around the stem and put the nut back on. Doesn't hurt to use some pipe dope too. I usually twist the tape into a strand first. Granted it won't stand up to repeated use like real graphite and asbestos packing but it's fine for that old valve you don't want to change right now and can just leave open or closed most of the time.

I've never done it on propane but it works great on water and higher pressure air(~200psi).

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I should’ve taken a picture. I tried tightening it and the leak did slow, but still leaked. I only brought up the tools I needed for the job, an adjustable wrench would’ve been helpful.

I’ll fix it when I go back to winterize and close up the property.
 
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