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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how reliable is a piece of four inch pvc sleaved into a piece of six inch terra cotta? how long before roots make the invasion?just curious....:thumbsup:
 

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This constitutes a reduction in pipe diameter which is a code violation everywhere.

As for roots I don't imagine that would slow them at all.
 

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Depends. What type of trees and how close to the line for maple seems to be the most invasive here. Also are you just tying into the terra cotta< If so then I would think the roots would invade quickly because of the material.
 

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I've seen this done in my area before to reline the entire pipe and it makes sense to a degree. Homes with the old toilets usually had a 4" main but now many mains only have a 3" because of the 1.6 toilet. Maybe the 6" terra cotta pipe was over sized? I would check the fixture load for the house and see if 4" would work before you decide your next course of action. Make sure a camera inspection gets done to make sure the new pipe goes all the way down and lastly, talk to your inspector and see if he'll pass the work.
 

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I'm lost on what is going to be done, it does not add up with me. More info is really needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
no its not a pipe reduction...coming off the cast iron main...twenty feet . the sewer runs right across the neighbors yard...we replaced all we could on his property....
 

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If the pipe is properly put together in the first place, then roots should not be a problem, except if you check your code, I think you will find that all underground gravity sewers must be graded for fall and bedded properly. I can't see how you can properly bed it without a grout injection afterwards. I would also insist on bell end pipe for that portion of the installation.

Also, if I were the homeowner, I would require a wet video inspection of the installation with a 360 degree interior view of all sleeved joints. This is to ensure there are no bellys in the pipe and that it is not holding water at any point. I doubt that clay is still on grade after all these years, but its possible.
 

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If the pipe is properly put together in the first place, then roots should not be a problem, except if you check your code, I think you will find that all underground gravity sewers must be graded for fall and bedded properly. I can't see how you can properly bed it without a grout injection afterwards. I would also insist on bell end pipe for that portion of the installation.

Also, if I were the homeowner, I would require a wet video inspection of the installation with a 360 degree interior view of all sleeved joints. This is to ensure there are no bellys in the pipe and that it is not holding water at any point. I doubt that clay is still on grade after all these years, but its possible.

We use nothing but clay sewers in Chicago, from building sewers to city mains, they work just fine when you bed them properly. Now I realize that plastic is the current material of choice, but don't discount a system that has worked just fine for a hundred years, it has passed the test of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
lol.well the only clay piping left is not
accesible due to being on his neighbors property...lol
 

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We use nothing but clay sewers in Chicago, from building sewers to city mains, they work just fine when you bed them properly. Now I realize that plastic is the current material of choice, but don't discount a system that has worked just fine for a hundred years, it has passed the test of time.
Killer, I'm not knocking salt glazed clay tile pipe, I kinda like the stuff, personally. In our soils in this area, we have trouble with the short joints bellying at the bells because of improper compaction and improper bedding over time. Its a matter of workmanship, not material failure.

I know its used almost exclusively in some parts of the country with great success. I'm just not a fan of how some folks installed it here in the past.
 

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No. He wants to put a 4" pvc "sleeve" inside a 6" terracotta pipe. Presumably as a patch for a section of broken terracotta?
When you say "he" you meen you inspector wants to put a piece of 4" inside the 6"?;)


If the fall is good, you can shoot liners, but to stick smaller pipe inside bigger pipe. "Ya' know that aint right."

***Watch out for tie-ins they can be expensive to reinstate.***:yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
lol. nevermind fellas. obviously no ones gettin the picture.....lol
 

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In a situation where the 6" clay pipe was required only for the addition of rainwater runoff but the house building sewer only required 4" then yes, sliplining to 4" is realistic. In that senerio the the rain water would have to be routed elswhare and not to the sewer.
 

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Killer, I'm not knocking salt glazed clay tile pipe, I kinda like the stuff, personally. In our soils in this area, we have trouble with the short joints bellying at the bells because of improper compaction and improper bedding over time. Its a matter of workmanship, not material failure.

I know its used almost exclusively in some parts of the country with great success. I'm just not a fan of how some folks installed it here in the past.
Most sewer work is done by the city actually, individual homeowners responsibility ends at the sidewalk. All sewers have to be laid in a bed of bank sand not less than ten inches deep, and compacted, and then backfilled with twenty four inches of bank sand and compacted again, then you can fill to grade using stone free earth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
DAMN QBAUM! u get it! hahahahaha. one person on here! jk jk
Most sewer work is done by the city actually, individual homeowners responsibility ends at the sidewalk. All sewers have to be laid in a bed of bank sand not less than ten inches deep, and compacted, and then backfilled with twenty four inches of bank sand and compacted again, then you can fill to grade using stone free earth.
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and most of the pipes with broken bells or root invasion do not have ne bedding and are seriously settled or misaligned over time...
 
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