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I recently made a thread about tapping old style faucets for replaceable seats and was met with some confusion as to why I would bother. I understand that every area of the country is different and we are all ignorant to each others own ways of doing plumbing. It has become apparent to me that not all of you run into old fixtures regularly so I figured I would take a moment and show you the tools I use to fix old faucets, shower valves, anything with a seat and a washer.


This kit has darn near everything and if you think you need something it doesn't have you are probably wrong. In addition to this kit I have a couple more tins of washers and seats. This kit weighs a BRICK. The plus side is that I only make one trip and aren't searching my van for small parts, even if my wrist falls apart lolz.


This kit and several of the tins are from the 60's and 70's. Made by J.A. Sexauer Mfg. in white plains, NY. They also had a location in Louisville, KY. Sexauer makes the best plumbing service tools hands down. It seems to me that they may have been run by a methodical old machinist who made ultra-realistic n-scale train setups in his free time and had specific custom made tools for everything. Then one day he hired a plumber to fix his faucet and that plumber might as well have been writing calligraphy with a ballpoint pen because the proper plumbing tools hadn't been invented yet. Seeing this fellow struggle Mr. Sexauer knew he had to right this wrong and got to work at his mill devising all sorts of fine instruments.


The brown box is my faucet re-seating tool. I was lucky enough to get this set because it also has the four larger cutters and extension not found in most sets as it was an option. I actually have several complete sets(no larger cutters) which are newer but I like the bare brass and brown paint.


The leather roll holds a set of removable seat wrenches. Below it is my small tap set. I made both of those leather tool rolls. The large square tapered seat wrench on the right is custom made from 1/2" bar stock. I needed to make to remove some exceptionally large seats from a speakman three handle shower valve. The black wrench to its right has two spiral extractor ends for removing chewed out seats. It is a much finer spiral thread than standard spiral extractors. That blue plate is for checking the threads on removable seats and shows their correlating part number. Almost every seat has a different, special, extra fine thread and you won't find a tap for them in any tap set other than one made just for these.







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Here you can see my small tap and die set, home made tap wrench, screw thread test plate, two handle pullers,and a toilet seat nut wrench which can come in handy for those really hidden nuts.



The larger puller has a slide hammer handle which is indispensable. I added a piece of 1/8" drill rod in the end, I got the idea from my other handle puller. Sometimes the handle screw hole is shallow and the drill rod pushes in the center of the stem allowing the fingers to pull on the handle sides. Without that rod the blunt nose would always sit on the top of the handle and would provide no pulling action on its own.



The smaller puller includes that round adapter for pulling 5/8" od compression fittings and the old ferrules from copper pipe. I have used it once for that and was very glad I had it. I was able to solder a regular stop on after. Otherwise I would have had to open the wall a bit to get fresh pipe.


The removable seat kit is one of several I have. It has the most commonly needed seats, a set of wrenches, and a thread gauge with 20 different seat sizes as well as 4 different bibb screw threads. You can see on the inside of the lid just some of the different thread pitches, hopefully you can appreciate the special taps that would be required.


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That seat ID card is cool and can be real handy. That text about a hotline is bs, there ain't even a 4 digit phone number on the back!!


The screw tin did have all sorts of stainless screws, most of them were oddball and I don't need wood screws in my faucet kit. I keep the few monel/ss seats I have in that box.



The o-ring kit has saved me several times, mostly on old rando cheap faucets with swivel goose necks.
 

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That washer kit is mostly the three most common sizes and a bunch of beveled washers. The beveled washers are necessary when you use the re-seating tool to grind a new face when you can't replace the seat. The beveled washers are also good when the seat is too short. Ideally I will get some seat taps and after using the seat grinder to make a smooth face and ream the hole I can then tap threads to use a removable seat. I have a couple other boxes of washers I don't keep in the kit here so they are easier to get to.

Those monel washer retainers are also indispensable. Many times the edge on the stem where the washer is held gets chipped, corroded, or is gone completely. The retainers replace those. I have also used them to take up the gap on odd size stem faces where standard washers don't fit snugly.

The monel screws are sweet. The heads don't strip out because they are much harder than brass and the pre applied threadlocker is top notch. The small easy taps are 10-24 so you can re-tap worn out smaller screw holes, usually that means an 8-24. They cut like really well. The #6 size screws I have actually never used on washers. I have used a couple on weird stuff like this one handle that needed a really small screw or as a set screw.
 

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i like the name regardless of what it does.. :vs_laugh::vs_laugh::vs_laugh:


i can see your point, but in my area there arent enough old faucets that people want to keep and the cost of repair and running to try and find parts makes no sense when installing new is usually the option..
 

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Great kit to have. I also have some Sexauer tins, but not the big jobber box that you have.


I have actually used a mini hacksaw blade to cut out slivers in a stubborn seat. My manager at the time wanted the tub valve repaired over my suggestion of replace the valve.


I also have the seat-thread plate. Great tool to have to verify the threads on a seat.


We should always have more than {1} way of doing something. Your kits give you the option of repairing tub and shower valves. Or, you could always cut open a wall and replace. Two ways of accomplishing the job.


I noticed that you didn't post a picture of a cap thread gasket kit. I also have one of those. You must have that kit if you have all those other kits.
 

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Cap thread gasket kit and a small seat kit.


I agree with you that a service man should be able to repair fixtures and such. I enjoy taking things apart, learning how it ticks and then putting said item back together.
 

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Cap thread gasket kit and a small seat kit.


I agree with you that a service man should be able to repair fixtures and such. I enjoy taking things apart, learning how it ticks and then putting said item back together.



I rarely seem to need cap seals. I have a box of them somewhere but it isn't well stocked. The few occasions I have needed them I almost never have the correct size so I will use teflon tape or an o-ring. Also, many of the faucets around here are new enough in design that the stems use o-rings or the caps use o-rings.


I search ebay all the time and will see all sorts of repair kits for brands that just aren't prevalent around here. I don't think I have ever seen a crane dial-ease in person but there are tons of parts kits for sale. It's mostly central brass, as, kohler, eljer, and speakman.


I do have a pretty new box of formed teflon bonnet packings but almost never need those either. Usually just cleaning the stem with some sanding cloth and some pipe dope and the packing seals well again. Luckily our water does more depositing than corroding so a good cleaning goes a long way. The brass parts will get a "protective coating" before they are eaten away chemically. That's why there are lots of old fixtures around here that people would rather fix. The chrome stays good and the faucet bodies remain serviceable.


That's why I want some seat taps. Most of the damage I see is from the seats having been replaced by someone who tightened them too much or cross-threaded them. If I could re-tap them to the next size up I could just pop in some new seats.


I emailed o'malleys manufacturing, they still offer the 4 tap repair kit for 63$ plus shipping although it isn't listed on their site. It includes 1/2, 9/16, 5/8, and 3/4 taps all with 27tpi thread pitch. It also includes matching removable seats. The 1/2-27 might be desirable because eljer seats are 1/2-27 and are a good size to replace a couple more common smaller seats like some a/s ones.




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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Scored this on ebay last night!! ebay.com/itm/254153683566



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Scored this on ebay last night!! ebay.com/itm/254153683566



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i have a bunch of flat seat grinders and some shapers, ill stick them in my cordless drill to smooth out seats in old faucets just to get people by till they can replace them, i tell them its a temp fix..i dont do alot of jobbing( who remembers that old term???)
 

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i have a bunch of flat seat grinders and some shapers, ill stick them in my cordless drill to smooth out seats in old faucets just to get people by till they can replace them, i tell them its a temp fix..i dont do alot of jobbing( who remembers that old term???)
I bought that lot for the omalley kit. Only one of the five in there is a flat seat grinder which I have several of and don't really use. The other four are "seat taps". So when the threads for a removable seat wear out I can tap new threads and use a new seat.

The other stuff is just a sweet score.


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This is the one that I have on my truck. I use it once in a while.

I would have posted pics but I was on mobile. The o-ring kit is a good score, it is two stacked trays almost full. The thread pitch tool will be nice, probably more accurate than my plastic card version. I replaced the seats on a couple old faucets last week and one today.


Tommys words have gotten to me, I now need to put a cap seal kit on my van or I will get a call next week needing several. Murphys law. I will have to go through all the boxes on the shelves at work.




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I bought that lot for the omalley kit. Only one of the five in there is a flat seat grinder which I have several of and don't really use. The other four are "seat taps". So when the threads for a removable seat wear out I can tap new threads and use a new seat.

The other stuff is just a sweet score.


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I love the old metal boxes. And yeah, you'll need a cap thread gasket one day and you'll be saying "Thanks Tommy plumber!"...…..:biggrin:

Every once in a while, either new stems don't come with a cap thread gasket or else I'll need one on a stem that I'm changing the bibb washer for. Some of them split while removing the old stems. It's a rarity for sure, but every once in a while you need one. {or use the t-tape trick which is a bit hackish}
 

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I love the old metal boxes. And yeah, you'll need a cap thread gasket one day and you'll be saying "Thanks Tommy plumber!"...…..:biggrin:

Every once in a while, either new stems don't come with a cap thread gasket or else I'll need one on a stem that I'm changing the bibb washer for. Some of them split while removing the old stems. It's a rarity for sure, but every once in a while you need one. {or use the t-tape trick which is a bit hackish}
I'd like to know what that is, I'm curious.
 

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I'd like to know what that is, I'm curious.



He just means using teflon tape to make a seal on the bonnet threads. Like wrapping a hard supply line ferrule with tape.


Attached is a picture of a globe valve. You can see the bonnet nut in green. What is not shown is the seal that goes under that lip where it meets the body. Old faucets have similar setups. Many don't have bonnet nuts/bonnet seals and this is how I have managed. Generally bonnet nuts present a likely leak location so most of the faucets left here are of a different design which doesn't include them.






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I'd like to know what that is, I'm curious.
its not some famous trick, its just gets you out of a jam, some cheap valves even new need some teflon tape to seal because the mating edges for the gasket are uneven and seep water...in a bind i have used teflon tape to pack a bonnet to stop it from pissing water..till valve can be replaced..
 
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