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Have a good mitigation company under your belt to call for situations like that. Most will give you a 10% kick. Easy money.
We do.
 

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I live in an 8-year-old 3 story home. We are on a private well and septic and have a sump pump in the basement. Every summer when the weather gets hot we start getting septic smells in the house. Have had our tank pumped yet we still get the smell. I’ve read that it could be a dry trap so I go and run water in every drain and appliance and it doesn’t stop the smell. We can’t pinpoint the origin of the smell. Once it comes it seems to cover the house instantly and doesn’t seem stronger in one area than another. We do have forced air which could be carrying the smell to the whole home but we still can’t figure out where the smell is originating. This problem only happens in the summer when the weather gets hot. We don’t have any smell problems in Fall, Winter, or Spring. All the local plumbers are always willing to come “take a look” but not for less than $100 and actual services performed are always more than $500. I’m willing to have a plumber fix the problem but I’m worried we are going to have to spend $3000+ to find the answer. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions?
I live in ky and this is normal for us,I love the smell of sewage in the morning
 

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this forum is for professionals only. Have you posted an introduction? That said, septic is not plumbing, so im going to break a major rule here and get ridiculed.

Stop eating so much corn in summer.

Also you are missing your inlet baffle, call a pumper have your tank drained, and have him check the conditions of the baffle.

Lastly, the success of modern civilization is 100% due to plumbing. Maybe hire one of us and pay us and be grateful.


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If the inlet baffle Is gone it would make no difference as far a smell or sewage goin in tank,you really don’t need a inlet baffle but you must have a outlet baffle of some kind
 

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If the inlet baffle Is gone it would make no difference as far a smell or sewage goin in tank,you really don’t need a inlet baffle but you must have a outlet baffle of some kind
spoken from an electrician. Every single time I get a service call for septic smell, and its on the roof vent, we find the inlet baffle is gone. It does limit the movement of air in the tank. For tips on what size inlet baffle to prevent clogs, the original poster must be blocked.

lasty fellas I do apologize. In Illinois Plumbing and Private Sewage are two different licenses. I understand in most states it falls under plumbing. It is plumbing, unless you are in Liberalnois.


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spoken from an electrician. Every single time I get a service call for septic smell, and its on the roof vent, we find the inlet baffle is gone. It does limit the movement of air in the tank. For tips on what size inlet baffle to prevent clogs, the original poster must be blocked.

lasty fellas I do apologize. In Illinois Plumbing and Private Sewage are two different licenses. I understand in most states it falls under plumbing. It is plumbing, unless you are in Liberalnois.


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I’m not an electrician hoss and you do not have to have an inlet baffle on a septic tank,if anything having a baffle on the inlet let’s it stop up easier and restricts airflow if there is any,if the house is plumbed correctly you will get a lot of sewage smell at the roof vent,that means the bacteria is working like it should in the tank,it’s obvious you know very little about septic systems lololololo
 

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spoken from an electrician. Every single time I get a service call for septic smell, and its on the roof vent, we find the inlet baffle is gone. It does limit the movement of air in the tank..........
They can if they aren't installed correctly. Septic tanks are suppose to vent, otherwise you get Hydrogen Sulfide gas buildup which is acidic and can corrode the underside of the tank.


 
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..........you do not have to have an inlet baffle on a septic tank............
You should have an inlet baffle on every septic tank. On older tanks this takes the form of a concrete wall which runs across shortways but only extends 1/2 to 1/3 down in the tank. This concrete baffle is not always visible from the inlet lid. Modern tanks have a corrugated plastic baffle or an sdr35 tee and dip tube. Really old tanks had clay pipe dip tubes. Or hand laid brick walls.

All of these baffles provide the same function. It forces the entering sewage to sink and get waterlogged. If you dont have some kind of baffle than the solids will float accross the tank and clog the oultet or lead to premature failure of the leach fields.

130068
 

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You should have an inlet baffle on every septic tank. On older tanks this takes the form of a concrete wall which runs across shortways but only extends 1/2 to 1/3 down in the tank. This concrete baffle is not always visible from the inlet lid. Modern tanks have a corrugated plastic baffle or an sdr35 tee and dip tube. Really old tanks had clay pipe dip tubes. Or hand laid brick walls.

All of these baffles provide the same function. It forces the entering sewage to sink and get waterlogged. If you dont have some kind of baffle than the solids will float accross the tank and clog the oultet or lead to premature failure of the leach fields.

View attachment 130068
Yes it is better to have it but I have been working on tanks for 25 yrs and many of the older ones have no inlet baffle whether it’s been knocked off or what,I’m saying a septic tank will work just fine without an inlet baffle,if you don’t believe me go dig up a tank and remove the inlet baffle if it has one and see if it will work as it should,I promise you it will be fine
 

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Yes but to OPs orignal question, IHOP or waffle house..

I myself prefer my eggs a little runny. Have you ever gone to a Plumbing supply house and found they have a broken urinal or sink???? I like turtles.
 

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You should have an inlet baffle on every septic tank. On older tanks this takes the form of a concrete wall which runs across shortways but only extends 1/2 to 1/3 down in the tank. This concrete baffle is not always visible from the inlet lid. Modern tanks have a corrugated plastic baffle or an sdr35 tee and dip tube. Really old tanks had clay pipe dip tubes. Or hand laid brick walls.

All of these baffles provide the same function. It forces the entering sewage to sink and get waterlogged. If you dont have some kind of baffle than the solids will float accross the tank and clog the oultet or lead to premature failure of the leach fields.

View attachment 130068

Yes, this is correct and YES a septic tank will function without an inlet baffle tee. Doesn't means it's ideal but it will function.

Worse is the inlet affecting air flow comments. An open inlet pipe or an open inlet baffle tee are both open pipes (through the roof vent). What's the difference?
 

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Yes, this is correct and YES a septic tank will function without an inlet baffle tee. Doesn't means it's ideal but it will function.........
Right. Might not clog the outlet in the tanl but I've snaked from outlet to first d-box because of clogs built up over the years. And I've had to locate first d-boxes because they got filled with crap. One little speck of schit at a time.

Inlet and outlet baffles are important for long term reliability.
 

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We have a good one going on right now. Two million dollar house has long had a sewer smell around the septic tanks. Repeat customer but new home for him. I see no where for a field line and start asking about a lift station. Home owner had no idea.

We find 2 septic tanks plus another 1500 gal tank for the pump except the pump is a cheap box box retailer sewage pump, no way it's lifting sewage 30' high, across a creek and 300' to the drain field. Sewage was just bubbling through the buried access wedge and escaping into a creek.

Trees, shrub removal, pumping, new risers and lids, clean outs, new duplex pump system with new power aaaaand it doesn't work. So today we start looking for the d box so before we run a new 300' pump line we know where to go and whether the field system is functional.
 

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We have a good one going on right now. Two million dollar house has long had a sewer smell around the septic tanks. Repeat customer but new home for him. I see no where for a field line and start asking about a lift station. Home owner had no idea.

We find 2 septic tanks plus another 1500 gal tank for the pump except the pump is a cheap box box retailer sewage pump, no way it's lifting sewage 30' high, across a creek and 300' to the drain field. Sewage was just bubbling through the buried access wedge and escaping into a creek.

Trees, shrub removal, pumping, new risers and lids, clean outs, new duplex pump system with new power aaaaand it doesn't work. So today we start looking for the d box so before we run a new 300' pump line we know where to go and whether the field system is functional.
Cha-Ching lololololol check for an inlet baffle lolololololo
 

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Cha-Ching lololololol check for an inlet baffle lolololololo
all I do is septic. 100% of the time the customer *****es about the smell, the inlet baffle is missing. Every ****ing time. Im not arguing weather or not it can be left out, or how often it breaks off in the concrete tanks. Bottom line, it slows the movement or gas from inside the tank through the roof. AND YES I know it is open in the top side and gas can just as easily travel down the top of baffle and into sewer line.


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all I do is septic. 100% of the time the customer *****es about the smell, the inlet baffle is missing. Every ****ing time. Im not arguing weather or not it can be left out, or how often it breaks off in the concrete tanks. Bottom line, it slows the movement or gas from inside the tank through the roof. AND YES I know it is open in the top side and gas can just as easily travel down the top of baffle and into sewer line.


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They are griping about the smell from where? The roof vent?
 

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That’s the way I took it also,makes no sense to me cause that’s where u gonna get your odor from lolololololo
wow a true pissing contest between a sparky (electrician) and plumber. Yes the roof vent. Im not a smell scientist, but 100% of time, the inlet baffle is missing, we replace it, smell gone. As I said, it slows the movement of gas through the pipes. The breaking down of sewage creates gas.


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It’s not terribly common around here, but a few times a year we get calls for septic related smells from the vent pipe like JS is referring to, and no, they never have an inlet baffle. However inlet baffles are extremely rare around here regardless of the age of the tank. I was unaware that sizing the baffle properly could negate clogging issues. Usually what happens is on days with the right atmospheric conditions Or high humidity and low wind, the sewer gasses don’t rise up into the air, they linger around the house and cause complaints. The few times I’ve found inlet baffles they are causing clogs so I avoid recommending them, usually put on a carbon filter. However if it’s possible to size them to avoid backups I may start doing that instead.
 

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wow a true pissing contest between a sparky (electrician) and plumber. Yes the roof vent. Im not a smell scientist, but 100% of time, the inlet baffle is missing, we replace it, smell gone. As I said, it slows the movement of gas through the pipes. The breaking down of sewage creates gas.


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You crazy
 
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