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Chase Plumber
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Try doing the underground on an elementary school. . .

3 types of sewerage.

Kitchen, Sanitary, and Storm.

Then you got back-venting, putting wall mount fixture carriers together, domestic water lines, and then finally set fixtures. .

It can get kinda crazy sometimes, lol

Glad I was just a "work-hand" then, lol

14 month long job ;\
 

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When I was doing housing, I preferred to have the waterlines in the floor. I suppose that's because of having to rip out walls to get to an elbow when the stub got broken off.

Of course, that won't work well with pedestals. If I know there's a pedestal instead of a cabinet, I usually ask for the fixture or at least rough-in measurements so I don't wind up in trouble. Too often a customer will buy a pedestal without realizing that the drain is too low and the trap won't fit. I have sometimes cured this situation by getting a different pedestal for the sink with a back that's open all the way down.

But bringing water lines up out of the floor makes any repair easier and also uses fewer fittings to install. 4" from the plate.

Another change is that a lot of bathroom counters used to be 30" but now they're often 31". I usually allow enough room for most sinks by using 17" off the plate for kitchens and 16" off the plate for basin drains. (I measure off the plate because you're usually marking a hole for a dirty arm in the center of a stud.)

When I do come out of the wall, I usually put my water lines about 2" above the drain stub.
 

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A Good Plumber- I was waiting to post those same dimensions, exactly for the reason you stated. When you rough the water less than 8" from center you may have an issue with a skirted toilet. Toto is famous for that. You pretty much can be assured that the 8" off center will be safe. I understand the others wanting to be close and tight for esthetics, but when the shut off is coming out of the floor at 6" center on a skirted one, your usually in trouble. When your coming out of the wall, the shut off will have to be smashed up against the wall. Obviously knowing beforehand what is going in is the key. How many times have you done the rough with out knowing it ?
 

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user4- I agree. Most of my work tends to be high end as well. Mostly 1/2 Million and up additions and bath and kitchen renovations starting in the $30K and up for baths and $60K and up for kitchens (of course these are not plumbing only prices). We did do a $250K kitchen a while back. Lady did not cook !! God's honest truth. All for show. But yes I have OCD and like everything dead on symetrical, level,plumb and straight. I don't know how old most of you are, but quite a while back like in the 80's and 90's, in my area everyone was putting in pedestals, some time side by side. They all had a cut out in the porcelain in the back. I learned the hard way never to take a designer's,showroom salesperson's or anyone's for that matter, dimension on the height of that porcelain back !! Go to finish and the trap is a half inch to low !! Either wanted the pedestal physically or a sheet with the spec's. Not for where the manufacturer said to put the drain, but where that porcelain cut out height was ! Just changing from 1 1/2' trap to 1 1/4' trap saved the day before. Other times, the tools would
fly !!!!. Because I took someone's word as far as the dimensions.
 

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Honest Plumb, while the topic is always timely, since we're always curious what other plumbers do, you are talking to ghosts with yer responses. All those posts were from 2008. Again, the topic is very cool, so please don't think me a jerk for pointing out the age of the thread.:) :)
 

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I know this thread is in the residential area but here are some common rough in diamentions for commercial
ADA urinal 14" for drain 27" for water 4-5/8" to the the left side from center of drain.
ADA lav 21" drain 18" off side wall 24" for water
 

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Consult the elevations. If that doesn't work, send off an RFI. Put the responsibility where it belongs, on their shoulders. What makes sense to you, find something else to do or rip it out and do it again?
 

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Lav water = 2" above drain on 8" centers

Lav drain = 22-24 (Due to drawers and thin floating vanities. Got tired of having to cut out the bottom of the cabinet to made room for my trap)

Toilet water = 9" off, 3-6" high (Depending on basebaord. We are having people install recessed 4" tall baseboards now. Installed before drywall and ends up flush with drywall. Ends up being an issue). 9"off looks odd with a standard economical toilet, but its not worth the aggravation when a regular toilet it spec'd and they choose a skirted Duravit or Toto last minute. "Joist was in the way, had no choice" is always tried and true excuse.

Toilet flange rough in - 13.5" from wall. Between skirted toilets, 4' x 10' marble floor to ceiling slabs behind the toilet and raised panel wainscoting. 12.5" ri has caused too many problems.

KS water = Generally out of the floor (kitchens are either on an outside wall or island here. Bars get stubbed out 2" higher and 8"cl on drain location"

KS drain = 15"

Laundry Tub water = 12" on 8" centers

Laundry Tub drain = 12"

Washer Box = 44" to bottom

Icemaker Box = dont install those here, just stub our water pipe out of the floor and have an isolation valve in the mechanical room with all the other valves.

How about you? (To answer, quote this and change the numbers for yourself.)
90 percent high end homes. These are my standard measurements, but always ask for final vanity drawings before stubbing anything out now. Drawers, floating vanities, furniture turned into a fixture etc always changes things.
 
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Lav water = 21" on 8" centers

Lav drain = 19"

Toilet water = 6" off center and 6" high

KS water = 21" on 8" centers

KS drain = 15"

Laundry Tub water = 12" on 8" centers

Laundry Tub drain = 12"

Washer Box = top at 42"

Icemaker Box = top at 18"

How about you? (To answer, quote this and change the numbers for yourself.)
 

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Hello -- I am newbee here! I realize this post has been started way back on the "way-back machine" but I liked what I saw and it begged for me to ask a question or two --- We are planning a new home and one of the plumbing items will be a under-mount laundry sink that is 12-inches deep. It is not a huge sink, just 21x18 and will be under-mounted to a solid countertop inside a 24-inch standard base cabinet height of 35 inch -- so with the 1 inch solid top it will be 36. So the sink top is at 35 inches then drops down 12 inches to where the drain starts. Using a 1-1/2 drain and P-trap. I tried to find the average depth of a P-Trap and they seem to run "about 4.75 to a little over 5 inches".

Now to have a tail piece added in just "where abouts" should the ROUGH-IN 1-1/2" PVC be located in the stud wall measured from the finished floor? And if you would be so gracious, suggest where the water lines would be. Also, is it BEST to offset the rough-in and NOT have it centered? I have ran into issues where the rough-in is directly behind the drain and the P-trap does not line up.

Thanks (sorry I got a bit long winded?)
 

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Hello -- I am newbee here! I realize this post has been started way back on the "way-back machine" but I liked what I saw and it begged for me to ask a question or two --- We are planning a new home and one of the plumbing items will be a under-mount laundry sink that is 12-inches deep. It is not a huge sink, just 21x18 and will be under-mounted to a solid countertop inside a 24-inch standard base cabinet height of 35 inch -- so with the 1 inch solid top it will be 36. So the sink top is at 35 inches then drops down 12 inches to where the drain starts. Using a 1-1/2 drain and P-trap. I tried to find the average depth of a P-Trap and they seem to run "about 4.75 to a little over 5 inches".

Now to have a tail piece added in just "where abouts" should the ROUGH-IN 1-1/2" PVC be located in the stud wall measured from the finished floor? And if you would be so gracious, suggest where the water lines would be. Also, is it BEST to offset the rough-in and NOT have it centered? I have ran into issues where the rough-in is directly behind the drain and the P-trap does not line up.

Thanks (sorry I got a bit long winded?)

 

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Always rough your lavatory drains in at 21" aff,if you rough in any lower you will either have to use a longer threaded tailpiece or a slip tailpiece,at 21" the trap will fit perfect with the 4" tailpiece that comes with the po plug
 

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Always rough your lavatory drains in at 21" aff,if you rough in any lower you will either have to use a longer threaded tailpiece or a slip tailpiece,at 21" the trap will fit perfect with the 4" tailpiece that comes with the po plug
Phuck that. We used to try that but then HOs would get special sh!t without telling anyone and that made the ptrap too high. Go lower and why really care about needing to use a slip joint extension.
 

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Phuck that. We used to try that but then HOs would get special sh!t without telling anyone and that made the ptrap too high. Go lower and why really care about needing to use a slip joint extension.
Second this opinion. It’s worth using 20 double sided tailpiece extensions if you don’t have to cut one cabinet or wall apart on trim.
 

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Replacing standard toilets with “Skirted” or “concealed trap” toilets can be a headache if the water line is coming up through the floor. These toilets are very popular right now, and a beeatch to install- in general.

Also “deep sinks” or “farm sinks” are all the rage right now, by the time you add the basket strainer, the drains original rough in height is to high, and it’s a impossible or b1tch to lower the drain once the cabinet/counter and sink are in.

I’m surprised these high end kitchen designers still don’t take this into consideration for either of these upgrades yet… then the client b1tche’s at us cuz we can’t fit/install the fixtures or drains.
 
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