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So im installing a Rheem eco200dveln3-1 tankless water heater in a commercial building.199,000 btu. the engineer left it up to me(after i showed him how much sediment and calcium were inline) to figure out what kind of sediment filter to put on the inlet water line. Any thoughts?Thanks in advance!
 

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So im installing a Rheem eco200dveln3-1 tankless water heater in a commercial building.199,000 btu. the engineer left it up to me(after i showed him how much sediment and calcium were inline) to figure out what kind of sediment filter to put on the inlet water line. Any thoughts?Thanks in advance!

The sediment is easy to solve, a 4x20 filter housing and a heavy duty sediment filter(50 micron) is you're best bet. 4x20 is the largest standard size without going to an expensive stainless housing. If you get a clear housing you can see when it needs to be changed. You can pipe several in parallel to get more flow and longer times between changing.


I would also suggest a spin down filter before the sediment filter. Spin down filter housings rely on the flow of the water to settle out the sediment and can be flushed out with a valve on the bottom. This will cut down on how often you have to change the main filter. I use my spin down filter without its internal filter installed, instead relying solely on the spin action. I do this because the small mesh filter in the spin down housing will quickly clog otherwise and is unnecessary if you have the 4x20 after it.



The calcium can only really be solved with a water softener, thousands of dollars. That is because it is dissolved into the water. You can use replaceable filters meant for softening but you would be changing them every couple days in a commercial setting. If you do install a softener it should be before any other filters and will likely be the only thing you need to install to remove all of the sediment as well as the lime. Softeners flush themselves automatically.


Any filter/treatment equipment you install should be piped in with bypass valves in case something leaks or for when you need to service the softener/change the filters.
 

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