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most females have the same thing..LMFAO...:vs_laugh::vs_laugh::vs_laugh:


but on a serious note, in my area the ground is almost pure sand, so water drains like no tomorrow, many or all basements just have a hole with a grate over it by the boiler for draining any water and is NOT piped into the plumbing system..
For us now no holes or gaps between the concrete and ground. It has to stop radon gas. Even sump pump pits and pipes have to be sealed 100%. That opens up a can of worms working on existing diy sump pits. There's no way of sealing them unless a full replacement and people are so cheap they expect a 25$ job because they were flooded. They prefer buying a new tv than paying a plumber.

They only hire the CHEAPEST PLUMBER in town because the insurance forces them to have a legit receipt. My sump pump page gets a lot of views from people trying to get info to do it themselves then they call to get dozens of free estimates.
 

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For us now no holes or gaps between the concrete and ground. It has to stop radon gas. Even sump pump pits and pipes have to be sealed 100%. That opens up a can of worms working on existing diy sump pits. There's no way of sealing them unless a full replacement and people are so cheap they expect a 25$ job because they were flooded. They prefer buying a new tv than paying a plumber.

They only hire the CHEAPEST PLUMBER in town because the insurance forces them to have a legit receipt. My sump pump page gets a lot of views from people trying to get info to do it themselves then they call to get dozens of free estimates.



that radon is another scam ....a whole industry built on BS.....just like the asbestos here..scare the crap out of people and they will spend a fortune for nothing...
 

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For us now no holes or gaps between the concrete and ground. It has to stop radon gas. Even sump pump pits and pipes have to be sealed 100%. That opens up a can of worms working on existing diy sump pits. There's no way of sealing them unless a full replacement and people are so cheap they expect a 25$ job because they were flooded. They prefer buying a new tv than paying a plumber.



They only hire the CHEAPEST PLUMBER in town because the insurance forces them to have a legit receipt. My sump pump page gets a lot of views from people trying to get info to do it themselves then they call to get dozens of free estimates.
You can seal that existing sump pit by removing any existing lid and getting a square of plexiglass bigger than the pit and drill a hole for the pipe and cord and then screwing the plexiglass to the concrete floor with a bead if silicone under it to make the seal.

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You can seal that existing sump pit by removing any existing lid and getting a square of plexiglass bigger than the pit and drill a hole for the pipe and cord and then screwing the plexiglass to the concrete floor with a bead if silicone under it to make the seal.

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And you can see through!:smile: But I bet it would crack when trying to cut it round.
 

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And you can see through! But I bet it would crack when trying to cut it round.
We don't cut it round. We get a square in the size we need from the hardware store and then use a holesaw for the hole for the pipe and cord. We pre drill some holes for screws and put it down and then mark up the holes on the floor. Then we remove it and drill the concrete. We put a thick bead of clear silicone around and put the plexiglass back down and screw it in. Admittedly you likely will not get it off again to replace the pump because of the silicone but so far we have not had to remove one. We have only done it that way a few times when radon was an afterthought and we ran the pipe up and out the sidewall in the basement. We don't have radon codes here in the plumbing book but they are working on it since its only in the construction book and very vague.

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I'll make a thread for it.

Anyway I can believe it as we are starting to get a lot of publications, tv shows, the construction code has changed, the plumbing code has changed too, even so the supply house sell sump pits that are now hermetically sealed with rubber grommets. Even not too far away they are digging for whatever radioactive materials for the nuclear power plant.

True or not If don't follow the code by sealing all the openings and someones files a complaint I'm going to pay from my pocket in extremely hefty fines. Trust me we have a lot of granola people around here.
 

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I'll make a thread for it.

Anyway I can believe it as we are starting to get a lot of publications, tv shows, the construction code has changed, the plumbing code has changed too, even so the supply house sell sump pits that are now hermetically sealed with rubber grommets. Even not too far away they are digging for whatever radioactive materials for the nuclear power plant.

True or not If don't follow the code by sealing all the openings and someones files a complaint I'm going to pay from my pocket in extremely hefty fines. Trust me we have a lot of granola people around here.



just look at the claim of climate change and all the $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ that has been made by taxing or forcing products down the consumers throat..all for a fake happening....and when this kind of money is being made, at least trillions world wide the hoax is well fed by all governments and crazy groups... and radon is just another one of the $$$$$$ makers, just look at all the extra work and product you have to install so someone is making $$$ off of it...
 

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heres an interesting article about asbestos, not so dangerous as some claim it to be, I want to know the real reason it has become such a feared product, my sneaky suspicion is the big oil companies and or other big companies that had insulating products to sell ganged up on asbestos to make it go away...you decide for yourself..
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...sbestos.html&usg=AOvVaw0G2oqh-jfQkDDUtsVZhf30
 

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As for asbestos I know a plumber who was diagnosed with it just a couple years ago, he couldn't go 20 feet before taking a break. I'd have to bring his tool box every day to help him out.

Last month they have banned the last pipes with asbestos. Those were used for rain water leaders. The last 10 years you had to have a hazmat suit and a bubble tent to cut the length you wanted. Not that many companies followed that rule... They are no longer allowed to be sold or installed.
 

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As for asbestos I know a plumber who was diagnosed with it just a couple years ago, he couldn't go 20 feet before taking a break. I'd have to bring his tool box every day to help him out.

Last month they have banned the last pipes with asbestos. Those were used for rain water leaders. The last 10 years you had to have a hazmat suit and a bubble tent to cut the length you wanted. Not that many companies followed that rule... They are no longer allowed to be sold or installed.



everything can be dangerous, it also depends how your body reacts to it...example..I can eat nuts and drink milk and the next person drops dead from it..you also have to look at the percentage of people exposed and how much to how many get sick or die...
do you think breathing in pvc cleaner or smoke from flux is healthy? probably not, but neither one is banned..


Approximately 90,000 people die from asbestos-related diseases globally each year. An estimated 125 million people worldwide remain at risk of occupational exposure to asbestos. About 1.3 million U.S. workers in construction and general industry are at risk of exposure today.




90 thousand globally die from asbestos each year..thats nothing but a drop in the bucket..but 640 thousand die from the flue each year..1.25 million die from auto accidents globally...so from that perspective asbestos is nothing to worry about..




646,000 people

CDC says more people die of influenza worldwide than some experts have estimated. As many as 646,000 people may die from influenza each year worldwide, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — a larger number than what other health experts have predicted in years past.Dec 13, 2017



Annual Global Road Crash Statistics
Nearly 1.25 million people die in road crashes each year, on average 3,287 deaths a day. An additional 20-50 million are injured or disabled. More than half of all road traffic deaths occur among young adults ages 15-44.
 

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Annual Global Road Crash Statistics
Nearly 1.25 million people die in road crashes each year, on average 3,287 deaths a day. An additional 20-50 million are injured or disabled. More than half of all road traffic deaths occur among young adults ages 15-44.

Especially Drunk Driving ! :devil3:
 

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Good thread.

The EPA has some results for Radon. >> https://www.epa.gov/radiation/radiation-sources-and-doses#tab-2. Is it a crisis, most likely not. No doubt with newer construction and mandated energy codes exposure goes up. Dwellings have gone form 9 to 12 air exchanges an hour down to 5, 3 or 2. Less air exchanges the more prevalent any chemical, CO, off gassing, etc. will affect anyone.


Dispelling the dis-information. >>> https://www.livescience.com/39546-radon.html


The possible concentrations seem to be the issue, not the exposure itself. Illinois mandate passive radon system installation in every new home. You will have a hard time selling an existing home that does not pass. I sold a 14 year old home first of this year. Completely dry basement, old open sump crock, basement floor not sealed around the edges, cracked never used tub rough box in the basement. Tested high. So to complete the sale we had a mitigation system installed. Which of course once tested high had to be installed by a licensed company. Easy install since the basement was not finished. Total cost just under $900.00.


Now, nothing mandates a test to verify levels were reduced after the installation, Hmm how safe is it? The installer missed sealing a portion of the floor behind the washer & dryer (to lazy to pull it out), missed sealing around the edges of the tub rough box, Checked the power connection to an overhead junction steel junction box. The fed a 12/2 W ground into the box without a romex connector or bushing. Exposing the NMS cable to damage. Guess who came back after I screamed at the realtor who suggested the company to make corrections.
 
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that radon is another scam ....a whole industry built on BS.....just like the asbestos here..scare the crap out of people and they will spend a fortune for nothing...

https://www.epa.gov/radiation/radiation-sources-and-doses#tab-2






I will give you that the radon issue is probably not an issue. Frankly if I was building a house I wouldn't care. I have heard of instances where A LOT of bedrock was exposed AND it was in a SEALED space so it built up, but that is rare and an odd set of circumstances.


Asbestos on the other hand is different and is a real threat that us guys at work worry about all the time and take very seriously. We know of guys who have had mesothelioma. We have also on occasion refused to remove a boiler/piping we were sent to when we have discovered asbestos. If we need to connect to the end of a long heat pipe we will wet it down to remove a bit and cut it and thread it. Whatever we remove gets shoved next to the pipe if possible or put next to another pipe with the same asbestos covering. It is highly illegal to move the stuff from a property and we would never do so.


Asbestos is the only known PHYSICAL cause of cancer. All of the other forms are chemical/biological. The asbesto fibers are extremely small needles which can pierce the cell wall and poke the nucleus causing damage.





Radon gas will break down and/or become dilute. Asbestos is pretty much forever.










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When is Asbestos Dangerous?


The most common way for asbestos fibers to enter the body is through breathing. In fact, asbestos containing material is not generally considered to be harmful unless it is releasing dust or fibers into the air where they can be inhaled or ingested. Many of the fibers will become trapped in the mucous membranes of the nose and throat where they can then be removed, but some may pass deep into the lungs, or, if swallowed, into the digestive tract. Once they are trapped in the body, the fibers can cause health problems.
Asbestos is most hazardous when it is friable. The term "friable" means that the asbestos is easily crumbled by hand, releasing fibers into the air. Sprayed on asbestos insulation is highly friable. Asbestos floor tile is not.
Asbestos-containing ceiling tiles, floor tiles, undamaged laboratory cabinet tops, shingles, fire doors, siding shingles, etc. will not release asbestos fibers unless they are disturbed or damaged in some way. If an asbestos ceiling tile is drilled or broken, for example, it may release fibers into the air. If it is left alone and not disturbed, it will not.
Damage and deterioration will increase the friability of asbestos-containing materials. Water damage, continual vibration, aging, and physical impact such as drilling, grinding, buffing, cutting, sawing, or striking can break the materials down making fiber release more likely.
Health Effects

Because it is so hard to destroy asbestos fibers, the body cannot break them down or remove them once they are lodged in lung or body tissues. They remain in place where they can cause disease.
There are three primary diseases associated with asbestos exposure:

  • Asbestosis
  • Lung Cancer
  • Mesothelioma
Asbestosis

Asbestosis is a serious, chronic, non-cancerous respiratory disease. Inhaled asbestos fibers aggravate lung tissues, which cause them to scar. Symptoms of asbestosis include shortness of breath and a dry crackling sound in the lungs while inhaling. In its advanced stages, the disease may cause cardiac failure.
There is no effective treatment for asbestosis; the disease is usually disabling or fatal. The risk of asbestosis is minimal for those who do not work with asbestos; the disease is rarely caused by neighborhood or family exposure. Those who renovate or demolish buildings that contain asbestos may be at significant risk, depending on the nature of the exposure and precautions taken.
Lung Cancer

Lung cancer causes the largest number of deaths related to asbestos exposure. The incidence of lung cancer in people who are directly involved in the mining, milling, manufacturing and use of asbestos and its products is much higher than in the general population. The most common symptoms of lung cancer are coughing and a change in breathing. Other symptoms include shortness of breath, persistent chest pains, hoarseness, and anemia.
People who have been exposed to asbestos and are also exposed to some other carcinogen -- such as cigarette smoke -- have a significantly greater risk of developing lung cancer than people who have only been exposed to asbestos. One study found that asbestos workers who smoke are about 90 times more likely to develop lung cancer than people who neither smoke nor have been exposed to asbestos.
Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that most often occurs in the thin membrane lining of the lungs, chest, abdomen, and (rarely) heart. About 200 cases are diagnosed each year in the United States. Virtually all cases of mesothelioma are linked with asbestos exposure. Approximately 2 percent of all miners and textile workers who work with asbestos, and 10 percent of all workers who were involved in the manufacture of asbestos-containing gas masks, contract mesothelioma.
People who work in asbestos mines, asbestos mills and factories, and shipyards that use asbestos, as well as people who manufacture and install asbestos insulation, have an increased risk of mesothelioma. So do people who live with asbestos workers, near asbestos mining areas, near asbestos product factories or near shipyards where use of asbestos has produced large quantities of airborne asbestos fibers.
Other Cancers

Evidence suggests that cancers in the esophagus, larynx, oral cavity, stomach, colon and kidney may be caused by ingesting asbestos. For more information on asbestos-related cancers, contact your local chapter of the American Cancer Society.
Determining Factors

Three things seem to determine your likelihood of developing one of these asbestos related diseases:

  1. The amount and duration of exposure - the more you are exposed to asbestos and the more fibers that enter your body, the more likely you are to develop asbestos related problems. While there is no "safe level" of asbestos exposure, people who are exposed more frequently over a long period of time are more at risk.
  2. Whether or not you smoke - if you smoke and you have been exposed to asbestos, you are far more likely to develop lung cancer than someone who does not smoke and who has not been exposed to asbestos. If you work with asbestos or have been exposed to it, the first thing you should do to reduce your chances of developing cancer is to stop smoking.
  3. Age - cases of mesothelioma have occurred in the children of asbestos workers whose only exposures were from the dust brought home on the clothing of family members who worked with asbestos. The younger people are when they inhale asbestos, the more likely they are to develop mesothelioma. This is why enormous efforts are being made to prevent school children from being exposed.
Because each exposure to asbestos increases the body burden of asbestos fibers, it is very important to reduce and minimize your exposure.
 

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https://www.epa.gov/radiation/radiation-sources-and-doses#tab-2






I will give you that the radon issue is probably not an issue. Frankly if I was building a house I wouldn't care. I have heard of instances where A LOT of bedrock was exposed AND it was in a SEALED space so it built up, but that is rare and an odd set of circumstances.


Asbestos on the other hand is different and is a real threat that us guys at work worry about all the time and take very seriously. We know of guys who have had mesothelioma. We have also on occasion refused to remove a boiler/piping we were sent to when we have discovered asbestos. If we need to connect to the end of a long heat pipe we will wet it down to remove a bit and cut it and thread it. Whatever we remove gets shoved next to the pipe if possible or put next to another pipe with the same asbestos covering. It is highly illegal to move the stuff from a property and we would never do so.


Asbestos is the only known PHYSICAL cause of cancer. All of the other forms are chemical/biological. The asbesto fibers are extremely small needles which can pierce the cell wall and poke the nucleus causing damage.





Radon gas will break down and/or become dilute. Asbestos is pretty much forever.










.
it seems asbestos is more apt to cause cancer is if you also smoke..that brings me to conclude that asbestos alone may or may not cause cancer..im not saying go sprinkle it like snow around the xmas tree, but it has been blown out of proportion for the harm it does compared to other daily contaminants that can also cause cancer or other related disease...
I guess ill let you know in another dozen years or so, because about 30 years ago when working for a company we use to rip out asbestos covered boilers once a week on average for maybe 6 months and it looked like a winter wonderland, and masks back then were not worn, so far I have no symptoms and had a few chest xrays over the last few years..so time will tell...
when they say long term exposure to asbestos of 20 or 30 years of breathing it in, almost any fiber or chemical will take its toll on you...but I think the lawyers found a money maker and have gone full speed ahead on it...
just like the talc powder they now say causes cancer because johnson and johnson have deep pockets, seems any product could cause cancer, just ask california...
look at round up now and the lawsuits lining up, but it is still used on a regular basis on farms and food daily..
 

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Well one of my regional State Inspectors who used to work in the field for many years as a plumber & insulator had to get out of the field and go to inspecting full time as he was diagnosed with Asbestosis.

Still around but with much less lung capacity.
 

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and if you go to the dr you take your life in your hands...




Previous research has sounded the alarm on this problem: One 2016 BMJ study, for instance, analyzed four studies of medical death rates from 2000 to 2008 and used hospital-admission rates from 2013. The researchers estimated that an annual 251,454 U.S. deaths — or 9.5% of all annual U.S. deaths — resulted from medical error, making it the third leading cause of death in the country.
 

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Naw, never at a Dr. Office, after all they are trained professionals right????
 

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Hi All,


Living in townhome. 3 levels including basement. 2100 Sq.Ft total.
Basement around 750 Sq.Ft



We currently have a sump pump in our basement which is around 10 years old. This sump pump has two power cords. Both power cords are connected to a single power outlet in a piggyback fashion.


The sump pump doesn't work when its in a piggyback power cord connection. When we just plug the back power cord (pump cord) directly to the outlet, then sump pump will work in continuous mode without stopping.


Anyhow since it is 10 years old, planning to replace it, rather than just trying to fix it and then worry again after few months.


New rookie questions:


1) Which Sump pump brand ,make & model are more reliable ?


This time I want to get the best one and not worry about basement flooding any more :) :)



2) Our vertical height from sump pump pit to the home exit is around
10 feet


3) Does it hurt if you buy a sump pump unit which is overkill for your home ?


4) What are the key factors to look into when buying a new sump pump


5) Are there sump pump which has two motors, so even if one fails the second one still works ?


6) Which submersible sump pump make & model is recommended ?




Any other suggestions are welcome.


Thanks for your help.


Please check the attached pics of existing sump pump.
 

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