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Most here know, but for those who do not, I also besides being a plumber also do building as well. So please forgive me for forgetting. I have to install a double bowl sink with a under mount sink. There is a deep bowl and a shallow one. If memory serves me right, the GD goes on the shallow bowl side, then arms over to the deep bowl side. How high to center off the finished floor is the waste set at? I was thinking 14" to 16" is what I used to do. If it was lower than needed I would use a 1-1/2" x 6" extension tube to compensate.

Sound right?
 

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I rough kitchen sinks no higher than 12". You can use an extension if the rough is too low, you're screwed if the rough is too high.
 

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residential service
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Attention all new con plumbers! Rough them in lower than they need to be and spend $1.20 on the extension. That way, in 15 years when they are ready to remodel and use a deeper sink, the swap out is much easier and the fact that you don't have to tear the back of the cabinet out may make all the difference in the sale for the poor old service plumber just trying to make enough money so he can take home a loaf of white bread, jar of mustard, and a stick of balogna to his poor hungry children and his wife.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Attention all new con plumbers! Rough them in lower than they need to be and spend $1.20 on the extension. That way, in 15 years when they are ready to remodel and use a deeper sink, the swap out is much easier and the fact that you don't have to tear the back of the cabinet out may make all the difference in the sale for the poor old service plumber just trying to make enough money so he can take home a loaf of white bread, jar of mustard, and a stick of balogna to his poor hungry children and his wife.
Sounds like you had a bad experience!
 

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Attention all new con plumbers! Rough them in lower than they need to be and spend $1.20 on the extension. That way, in 15 years when they are ready to remodel and use a deeper sink, the swap out is much easier and the fact that you don't have to tear the back of the cabinet out may make all the difference in the sale for the poor old service plumber just trying to make enough money so he can take home a loaf of white bread, jar of mustard, and a stick of balogna to his poor hungry children and his wife.
Where can I get a 20 GA brass slip extension for under $8.00?
 

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residential service
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You can't but for those of us who operate under plumbing codes that find no evil in pvc slip joint extensions they can be had lots of places for a couple of bucks.
 

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residential service
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But if you're going to use brass don't ride the fence. Either use the 22 gauge so that I'll have some repair work out of it one day or use the 17 gauge which has a reasonable chance of out living us both or at least lasting to the next rehab.
 

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I am often in the overkill business. Many people take comfort from the overkill and are willing to pay for the overkill precisely because it is overkill. I can't tell them that 20 gauge will never rot because I've seen it rotten. I can't tell them that 17 gauge won't rot for that matter because it's the same material and given enough time, it will rot also. I can tell them however that I have never seen rotten 17 gauge and that is plenty good enough for many people.

Heavy things sell better.
 

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I am often in the overkill business. Many people take comfort from the overkill and are willing to pay for the overkill precisely because it is overkill. I can't tell them that 20 gauge will never rot because I've seen it rotten. I can't tell them that 17 gauge won't rot for that matter because it's the same material and given enough time, it will rot also. I can tell them however that I have never seen rotten 17 gauge and that is plenty good enough for many people.

Heavy things sell better.
There is a difference, you are selling product, I am installing what the architect speced, which is usually a 20 GA polished nickel p-trap, so we use the same gauge for the kitchen wastes.

We do use 17 GA fine thread tailpieces though, because they actually have some taper and can make up without bottoming out and still leaking.
 

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residential service
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Brass does not rust.

I think you are are referring to 22 GA for the splitting.
True but I am not referring to rust. Hard water will eat them up.

Up north and in the midwest people would laugh at me if I claimed we had hard water. That's because yours is so hard that it demands softening and I imagine virtually every home in certain regions has some sort of water treatment.

In my neck of the woods, the water is only moderately hard. This results in a lot of business for me because although it will not damage plumbing systems as quickly as it would elsewhere, virtually no one softens their water here and so it does it's damage a bit slower but just as certainly.
 

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waterheaterzone.com
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There is a difference, you are selling product, I am installing what the architect speced, which is usually a 20 GA polished nickel p-trap, so we use the same gauge for the kitchen wastes.

We do use 17 GA fine thread tailpieces though, because they actually have some taper and can make up without bottoming out and still leaking.
Good point KTS, the most problems I see with 20 gauge is the threaded tubes, and also p-traps since they hold water all the time.
 

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True but I am not referring to rust. Hard water will eat them up.

Up north and in the midwest people would laugh at me if I claimed we had hard water. That's because yours is so hard that it demands softening and I imagine virtually every home in certain regions has some sort of water treatment.

In my neck of the woods, the water is only moderately hard. This results in a lot of business for me because although it will not damage plumbing systems as quickly as it would elsewhere, virtually no one softens their water here and so it does it's damage a bit slower but just as certainly.
Chicago's water comes from Lake Michigan, it is not hard water, water softeners are unheard of in the city.
 
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