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WILLPLUMB4$
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I ALWAYS TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM ANYTHING A HOME OWNER MAY BE ABLE TO DO THEMSELVES OR INSTALL(FURNISH & INSTALL) FROM THE LOCAL D.I.Y CENTER. WOULD LIKE YOUR OPINOINS ON "QUICK CONNECTS" FOR WATER HEATER INSTALLS. ALSO WONDERING IF THERE MAY BE ANY CODE ISSUES IN USING THEM.:blush:
 

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WILLPLUMB4$
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the correction. I was indeed refering to "flex lines" Would you use them? They look like they would speed up installation.
 

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Banned
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8,808 Posts
I'm a professional and I use them, sorry you feel that way about them.
 

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Nothing wrong with giving your honest opinion, it is always nice to know what others think about a product, pex vs. copper, some like it some don't, some call it unprofessional and some say it looks good when done right. pvc vs. abs, some like some don't, it's a way of life. :)
 

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residential service
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1,948 Posts
Sounds like you're referring to flex lines.In this state a homeowner cannot install thier own Wtr.Htr. so the type of connection has no bearing.
Does this mean that Blowe's and HD don't sell water heaters in your state? Is this local code or IPC? We are under IPC here in Birmingham which if I remember correctly forbids any plumbing work which requires the cutting of any pipe in order to complete the work (or something like that). You would think this would keep the handymen and ho's from doing anything other than a faucet or toilet replacement and yet HD and Blowe's sell the snot out of water heaters and plumbing pipe/fittings of virtually every type. The problem is that the average ho (or handyman for that matter) knows absolutely nothing about the plumbing code and so they have no clue they are breaking the law and 99.9% of them wouldn't care if they did know.

Oh yeah, "flexies" make it that much easier for the handyman to swap out a tank that he has no business touching. I'm not telling you what to do Threader 'cause I know you are a good plumber and I know the "flexies" save a lot of time. I will not use them even though I lose revenue because I am higher than most around here for a wh install because I hardpipe and use a good tank. It makes it harder to sell when you are $200 - $400 more than a lot of other people but I figure if I want to be able to install any wh at all in 10 years then I better stay away from the flexies. Of course I realize I'm probably spitting against the tide but I just can't bring myself to use them.
 

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waterheaterzone.com
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2,043 Posts
Does this mean that Blowe's and HD don't sell water heaters in your state? Is this local code or IPC? We are under IPC here in Birmingham which if I remember correctly forbids any plumbing work which requires the cutting of any pipe in order to complete the work (or something like that). You would think this would keep the handymen and ho's from doing anything other than a faucet or toilet replacement and yet HD and Blowe's sell the snot out of water heaters and plumbing pipe/fittings of virtually every type. The problem is that the average ho (or handyman for that matter) knows absolutely nothing about the plumbing code and so they have no clue they are breaking the law and 99.9% of them wouldn't care if they did know.

Oh yeah, "flexies" make it that much easier for the handyman to swap out a tank that he has no business touching. I'm not telling you what to do Threader 'cause I know you are a good plumber and I know the "flexies" save a lot of time. I will not use them even though I lose revenue because I am higher than most around here for a wh install because I hardpipe and use a good tank. It makes it harder to sell when you are $200 - $400 more than a lot of other people but I figure if I want to be able to install any wh at all in 10 years then I better stay away from the flexies. Of course I realize I'm probably spitting against the tide but I just can't bring myself to use them.
EXACTLY! Good post.
 

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residential service
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1,948 Posts
Not on a water heater but I answered a call to a flooded house once in which the culprit was a burst "no burst" stainless steel supply for a dishwasher. It looked like a little bomb went off inside. At the rupture point the ss was just peeled back on either side of the rupture almost completely around the circumference of the line. There was maybe an 1/8" of braid left in tact. Never have been able to figure it out. House pressure tested at 130 psi which is high but it's inconceivable to me that 130 did this. I have a pic if I can ever figure out how to get my photos on here.
 

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378 Posts
Does this mean that Blowe's and HD don't sell water heaters in your state? Is this local code or IPC? We are under IPC here in Birmingham which if I remember correctly forbids any plumbing work which requires the cutting of any pipe in order to complete the work (or something like that). You would think this would keep the handymen and ho's from doing anything other than a faucet or toilet replacement and yet HD and Blowe's sell the snot out of water heaters and plumbing pipe/fittings of virtually every type. The problem is that the average ho (or handyman for that matter) knows absolutely nothing about the plumbing code and so they have no clue they are breaking the law and 99.9% of them wouldn't care if they did know.

Oh yeah, "flexies" make it that much easier for the handyman to swap out a tank that he has no business touching. I'm not telling you what to do Threader 'cause I know you are a good plumber and I know the "flexies" save a lot of time. I will not use them even though I lose revenue because I am higher than most around here for a wh install because I hardpipe and use a good tank. It makes it harder to sell when you are $200 - $400 more than a lot of other people but I figure if I want to be able to install any wh at all in 10 years then I better stay away from the flexies. Of course I realize I'm probably spitting against the tide but I just can't bring myself to use them.
I kinda gave up the fight.Yes local code dictates the unit must be installed by a licensed plumber.People aren't scared to solder anymore,I know gals/ho's that have run pex in thier own houses.You can't stop the mad-ness.Many don't know what a crimp guage is and many will have failed connections in the years to come.I guarantee,and it will be what they deserve!There's work out there smells for those of us that are at the top of our field,you"ll be fine!:)
 

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8,104 Posts
Hard piping a water heater is not going to save us from handymen or ho's. They can cut the copper back and put comp. x male adt. if they are inclined to do so. I change more water heaters that have been flexed than that are still hard piped. Flex connectors are code approved, make me faster money, last the life of the w/h and look like a work of art like everything else I touch.
 

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I've never used flex connectors on the water lines nor have I seen them used here. I have used flex connectors on gas.
 

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I aint CPV see in it?
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4,896 Posts
I use them on alot, the copper ones. The braided ones are not code approved here, plus they kink. The copper ones work well. I have not had a problem with any that I have installed over the past, oh i dont know, 10 yrs. Seems though I have seen some pinhole leaks on these copper flexs. they are pretty thin aournd teh spiral.
 

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I still think 3/4 by 1/2 (or by 3/4 if that's what's there) copper female adapters and two swedged pieces of copper is not only the best way to go, but the cheapest too.
 

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We have used thousands of them. To tell you the truth, if a H/O is hell bent on doing their own work, hard piping the hot water tank is not going to disuade them imo. Most of the time if a hot water tank is connected with a flex connector, depending upon the age, the connector will leak at the gasket when reattached.
 
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