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I'm running gas from my meter to the backyard for a fireplace on my deck, a fire pit, and tiki torches. Based on the sizing chart, I need to run 1 1/4 pipe. My main gas service is only 1" pipe. Is it okay to run 1 1/4 inch pipe when my service line is only 1"? thank you
 

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Best and safest to hire a professional when dealing with gas piping. If you install yourself and anything goes wrong even years later, you will be held liable and if you have a home owners policy, your insurance carrier with disavow you.
 

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Reverend, R.S.E., Master Plumber
Nice Head, what’s in the bag?
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Sounds like you have some money,
open up your wallet and pay a Lic’ed pro to do the work properly and to code.
There is a very good reason why you need to be Lic’ed to fit gas.

there is NO participation trophy’s in gasfitting.
 

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I'm running gas from my meter to the backyard for a fireplace on my deck, a fire pit, and tiki torches. Based on the sizing chart, I need to run 1 1/4 pipe. My main gas service is only 1" pipe. Is it okay to run 1 1/4 inch pipe when my service line is only 1"? thank you
I'll give you this little bit because of how dangerous gas can be: you used the sizing chart wrong. The short answer is no, you cannot.

Did you check with the city or gas company to make sure you're allowed to run gas piping? I can almost guarantee that you aren't, and even if you are it likely needs to be checked by a licensed plumber or gasfitter anyway. Save yourself some cash, hire a pro, and get it done right the first time.
 

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First, the many other replies are right. Gas fitting is a licensed trade. Plumbing is allowed by the homeowner in most jurisdictions but gas? Not so much. But as to sizing. Often we will run a larger pipe size from the 1” pipe the meter yoke is made from. As counter-intuitive as it looks, the purpose is to reduce internal pipe friction so that the required volume of gas is delivered to the fixture at the lowest supply pressure. But that is not the only way. Since the fire pit is outdoors a second pressure reducing valve can be added to the meter yoke. It will be set for about 2 - 2 1/2 PSI gas supply pressure so much smaller pipe or tubing may be used. This is a completely different flow sizing table than the one used for indoor piping based on 3 1/2” water column pressure. You may even be able to use 1/2 nom poly gas tubing for the fire pit.
But remember… 2 pound gas systems are commercial types and must never be used indoors. They also require a special PRV at both ends as your gas log would really, really like 2 psi gas. It would feel like a forest fire!
 

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First, the many other replies are right. Gas fitting is a licensed trade. Plumbing is allowed by the homeowner in most jurisdictions but gas? Not so much. But as to sizing. Often we will run a larger pipe size from the 1” pipe the meter yoke is made from. As counter-intuitive as it looks, the purpose is to reduce internal pipe friction so that the required volume of gas is delivered to the fixture at the lowest supply pressure. But that is not the only way. Since the fire pit is outdoors a second pressure reducing valve can be added to the meter yoke. It will be set for about 2 - 2 1/2 PSI gas supply pressure so much smaller pipe or tubing may be used. This is a completely different flow sizing table than the one used for indoor piping based on 3 1/2” water column pressure. You may even be able to use 1/2 nom poly gas tubing for the fire pit.
But remember… 2 pound gas systems are commercial types and must never be used indoors. They also require a special PRV at both ends as your gas log would really, really like 2 psi gas. It would feel like a forest fire!
You have much to learn about being on PZ!
 

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You have much to learn about being on PZ!
???… What does this mean? The question was asked by a registered member of this forum. I answered his question with the reasons applicable to the first part and gave him an option that would solve his issue and reduce his costs. What do you believe I need to learn? I taught the apprenticeship program for both plumbers and pipe fitters for nearly twenty years and have always enjoyed sharing knowledge and experience when asked.
If the collegial discussion of problems and issues in our common industry is not the focus of this forum then perhaps my participation is not desired.
 

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???… What does this mean? The question was asked by a registered member of this forum. I answered his question with the reasons applicable to the first part and gave him an option that would solve his issue and reduce his costs. What do you believe I need to learn? I taught the apprenticeship program for both plumbers and pipe fitters for nearly twenty years and have always enjoyed sharing knowledge and experience when asked.
If the collegial discussion of problems and issues in our common industry is not the focus of this forum then perhaps my participation is not desired.
Just because they are registered doesn't mean they are allowed to be here. We've discussed this riggamaroll to death. So please, instead of beating a dead horse for the 100th time....

Don't respond to posters who aren't Proffesional Plumbers, and those who haven't post a proper introduction in the new member introduction area. This site is not for the diy/handyman.

If they have very few posts, you probably shouldn't respond to them without checking first.
 

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Just because they are registered doesn't mean they are allowed to be here. We've discussed this riggamaroll to death. So please, instead of beating a dead horse for the 100th time....

Don't respond to posters who aren't Proffesional Plumbers, and those who haven't post a proper introduction in the new member introduction area. This site is not for the diy/handyman.

If they have very few posts, you probably shouldn't respond to them without checking first.
^ What he said ^
 

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Sorry. I thought the moderators vetted applicants before they were allowed in. I did not know that the great unwashed were listening at the keyhole. I submitted my intro when I applied. I thought it was required to pay the price of admission. So don’t respond to newly minted members? We wait until they prove they are worthy through the questions they ask?
 

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Sorry. I thought the moderators vetted applicants before they were allowed in. I did not know that the great unwashed were listening at the keyhole. I submitted my intro when I applied. I thought it was required to pay the price of admission. So don’t respond to newly minted members? We wait until they prove they are worthy through the questions they ask?
Exactly. The community vets new members. Some, unlike you, don’t bother with an intro, some half azz it. You’ll get the hang of things.
There is a somewhat good filter for spammers, but they do get through. If you see a one post with a link, report it immediately. Don’t quote them, just makes more work editing their post and yours.
 

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So don’t respond to newly minted members? We wait until they prove they are worthy through the questions they ask?
Don't give them information until they prove they are a legitimate plumber through the introduction they provide.

Unless you're okay with an unlicensed hack working on someone's home or a tenant messing with their landlord's plumbing. We don't want to facilitate that.
 
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