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The green pipe is thin wall sewer pipe and is probably being used for the AC refrigerant and drain lines.

Manifolds are never to be buried beneath the slab. No joints under the slab except brazed…..

The pipe can’t run in the same ditch rubbing each other…..

That would fail inspection anywhere.

Mark,
Why are you roughing in jobs in Florida ?

J/k 🤡
 

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Well it might be more expensive to insulate copper lines in a slab but
I have never worried about the 50-100 bucks more that was gonna come out of
my pocket... I just did not want to hear any chit down the road from ground up
hot water lines in the slab...

If it were my own home I would 100% certainly insulate everything...
Insulation costs more than the pipe when you’re running pex buddy.
 

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probably true, but for my own home it would be done for sure

whats money anyway..??
Sparky says I am working on my second million so what me worry??
Why would you use pex instead of copper ?

I doubt you’d use pex, I could understand the idea behind insulating the copper but most people who use pex do so because of the price difference. Not always, but mostly. Some places the water and soil are not copper friendly. You can protect the copper but then it becomes even more expensive to install and/or possibly maintain with treatment and filtering.
 

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Breh it just doesn’t get that cold around here, last hard freeze we had was the 2013 national championship game. Backflows were spraying everywhere and half the damn town was in pasedena. We turned them off and stuck a card in the door.
I realize that. I basically live down the skreet from youz

I was questioning his logic. Requires insulation on pipe but doesn’t require hose Bibb protection.
 

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Insulation stops condensate and energy loss, it does almost nothing to prevent freezing. In fact, insulating the line to a sillcock will make the pipe more likely to freeze as it can't get heat as quickly from inside the home. It loses heat at the sillcock. We have some sillcocks around here that are 100yrs old and have never frozen because the pipe going to them gets so much heat from in the home.
Our plumbing code requires crawlspace and attic water piping be insulated. So that’s how the cookie crumbles.
 
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