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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
trying to get the cold side valve body for this. Original fixtures in home about 25 years old. Price pfister, supply house has cartridge but I need a valve body since the cold side won’t come out. Customer doesn’t want to replace the whole faucet since they would have to replace all of them in the bathroom to match. Any help would be great. Thanks.
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Looks like a match to me. I appreciate it.
Keep in mind, hot stems turn off clockwise aka right hand.

Cross handles should both be hot stems. Lever handles take one of each.
 

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Try spraying silicon spray and letting it set for a few hours? Then, grab the body of the cartridge (the threaded shaft) with a good pair of channel locks and the cartridge nut with an open end or adjustable (crescent) wrench and give it a tug with a little elbow grease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Have you tried heating it slightly with your torch? Heat almost always works.
No I didn’t think of that honestly, but I will keep that in mind in the future.

This customer was a really pia. Really particular in where I set my tools, running water “excessively”, etc. I pretty much got as much info as I could to find parts and got out of there. I got the two stems and I also got a new valve body for the left side. So we will see what happens.

Side note, has anyone before had water hammer or loud whistling coming from a faucet like this? What was happening was when the hot side turned on it would start thumping and then start whistling loud until the cold side was opened up a little. This is the only faucet doing it, no recirculating system, 50 gallon tank feeding this part of home, shut offs under sink are new. I figured it was the stems wearing out. They were dripping a bit when i got there.
 

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No I didn’t think of that honestly, but I will keep that in mind in the future.

This customer was a really pia. Really particular in where I set my tools, running water “excessively”, etc. I pretty much got as much info as I could to find parts and got out of there. I got the two stems and I also got a new valve body for the left side. So we will see what happens.

Side note, has anyone before had water hammer or loud whistling coming from a faucet like this? What was happening was when the hot side turned on it would start thumping and then start whistling loud until the cold side was opened up a little. This is the only faucet doing it, no recirculating system, 50 gallon tank feeding this part of home, shut offs under sink are new. I figured it was the stems wearing out. They were dripping a bit when i got there.
Stop underneath may have a bad washer or be partially closed. When water goes through a compression valve that isn't open all the way it causes a vacuum on the washer pulling it closed and stopping the water momentarily, this causes water hammer.

OR

The ceramic disk is broken in the hot stem, this also explains why it's dripping.

If the hammer came before the dripping started then it could have caused the ceramic disk to crack.
 

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No I didn’t think of that honestly, but I will keep that in mind in the future.

This customer was a really pia. Really particular in where I set my tools, running water “excessively”, etc. I pretty much got as much info as I could to find parts and got out of there. I got the two stems and I also got a new valve body for the left side. So we will see what happens.

Side note, has anyone before had water hammer or loud whistling coming from a faucet like this? What was happening was when the hot side turned on it would start thumping and then start whistling loud until the cold side was opened up a little. This is the only faucet doing it, no recirculating system, 50 gallon tank feeding this part of home, shut offs under sink are new. I figured it was the stems wearing out. They were dripping a bit when i got there.
I think you need to get to the bottom of the water hammer. Check the local pipe strapping (if you can), have a good look at the stops and check the pressure on the system.

I will usually replace the stops when I replace a faucet, but it might be a good idea to replace them in this case anyway. I 100% agree with Skoro above.

I have also seen debris in the stop cause similar issues.

Many times, I’ve gone through peoples homes and pointed issues out like stops (old compression stops) and pulled out a WB 1/4 turn stop and let them hold it, then show them an old compression stop from what ever it was I had been working on. At that point (provided it ACTUALLY needs to be done) suggest replacing every stop in the house. Sometimes they go for it, sometimes not. But it’s a nice upsell and the clients like it.
 

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...........Many times, I’ve gone through peoples homes and pointed issues out like stops (old compression stops) and pulled out a WB 1/4 turn stop and let them hold it, then show them an old compression stop from what ever it was I had been working on. At that point (provided it ACTUALLY needs to be done) suggest replacing every stop in the house. Sometimes they go for it, sometimes not. But it’s a nice upsell and the clients like it.
I salute you sir, you really have the motivation. I think I'd rather snake a schit filled main in a crawlspace before I went and replaced all the stops in a house.

Now you've got me thinking about the number of stops in the AVERAGE house I work in.....
 

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I salute you sir, you really have the motivation. I think I'd rather snake a schit filled main in a crawlspace before I went and replaced all the stops in a house.

Now you've got me thinking about the number of stops in the AVERAGE house I work in.....
LOL!
I’d rather replace every stop in a house than go for the crawl…. I hate the crawl; and now that I’m solidly middle aged, I really hate the crawl.

Also, it takes like an hour or an hour and a half to do the whole house (compression stops, pull the nut, with a new escutcheon). It’s NBD. My caviat is that I ask the homeowner for some “help” by removing there schit from under their sinks etc.

If a house is galv, or has galv nipples, I won’t offer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Stop underneath may have a bad washer or be partially closed. When water goes through a compression valve that isn't open all the way it causes a vacuum on the washer pulling it closed and stopping the water momentarily, this causes water hammer.

OR

The ceramic disk is broken in the hot stem, this also explains why it's dripping.

If the hammer came before the dripping started then it could have caused the ceramic disk to crack.
That homeowner is away for work so I haven’t gone back to install the new parts. However, when I was there originally I did replace the hot and cold angle valves so the faucet could be shut off while I get parts. Noise wasn’t caused by the shut offs. A cracked ceramic washer would make sense
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think you need to get to the bottom of the water hammer. Check the local pipe strapping (if you can), have a good look at the stops and check the pressure on the system.

I will usually replace the stops when I replace a faucet, but it might be a good idea to replace them in this case anyway. I 100% agree with Skoro above.

I have also seen debris in the stop cause similar issues.

Many times, I’ve gone through peoples homes and pointed issues out like stops (old compression stops) and pulled out a WB 1/4 turn stop and let them hold it, then show them an old compression stop from what ever it was I had been working on. At that point (provided it ACTUALLY needs to be done) suggest replacing every stop in the house. Sometimes they go for it, sometimes not. But it’s a nice upsell and the clients like it.
I personally prefer the compression stops. The quarter turns in my area have trouble with the hard water. I can at least rebuild the multi turns if needed
 

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LOL!
I’d rather replace every stop in a house than go for the crawl…. I hate the crawl; and now that I’m solidly middle aged, I really hate the crawl.

Also, it takes like an hour or an hour and a half to do the whole house (compression stops, pull the nut, with a new escutcheon). It’s NBD. My caviat is that I ask the homeowner for some “help” by removing there schit from under their sinks etc.

If a house is galv, or has galv nipples, I won’t offer.
We use sweat stops and chrome supplies. I guess if you use 5/8" compression stops and flex ss supplies it isn't as much labor.

My opinion is if it ain't broke don't fix it, most of the time. Obviously some things need to be done proactively. In your case I'd just make sure they know where the main shut off is and that it works easily. No need for them to be fumbling with a crusty stop.
 

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We use sweat stops and chrome supplies. I guess if you use 5/8" compression stops and flex ss supplies it isn't as much labor.

My opinion is if it ain't broke don't fix it, most of the time. Obviously some things need to be done proactively. In your case I'd just make sure they know where the main shut off is and that it works easily. No need for them to be fumbling with a crusty stop.
Most of the homes that I deal with are built in the 50s through the 80s. A lot of them have the original cheap compression stops with plastic internals. A very large number of them have the supply tube soldered into them.

All of that said most of the valves to shut the water off are old gate valves that don’t work very well. There is always the option of shutting the water off at the meter but you need a meter key, and I’m not a fan of teaching home owners how to do that.

Up until very recently I have almost always run soft copper supply tubes. But I really like the braided stainless. They are easy to deal with, quick, and seem to hold up pretty well. I will still use a soft copper toilet tube. Because I think the curled up braided stainless steel looks terrible; and of course for something like a pedestal sink. I still keep a spring bender in my tool box.

All through my career I have almost never used a sweat on stop. I actually prefer a drop-ear wing 90 in the wall with a brass nipple and an IPS stop. But most of what I replace is compression and it’s super easy to pop those off with the Pasco puller.

So yes, it’s mostly compression stops and stainless steel braided supply tubes.

I agree with you about just shutting the water off rather than dealing with a crusty stop. But I’ve seen a lot of the plastic stem stops break off in such a way that they’re just spraying water everywhere.
 

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Most of the homes that I deal with are built in the 50s through the 80s. A lot of them have the original cheap compression stops with plastic internals. A very large number of them have the supply tube soldered into them.

All of that said most of the valves to shut the water off are old gate valves that don’t work very well. There is always the option of shutting the water off at the meter but you need a meter key, and I’m not a fan of teaching home owners how to do that.

Up until very recently I have almost always run soft copper supply tubes. But I really like the braided stainless. They are easy to deal with, quick, and seem to hold up pretty well. I will still use a soft copper toilet tube. Because I think the curled up braided stainless steel looks terrible; and of course for something like a pedestal sink. I still keep a spring bender in my tool box.

All through my career I have almost never used a sweat on stop. I actually prefer a drop-ear wing 90 in the wall with a brass nipple and an IPS stop. But most of what I replace is compression and it’s super easy to pop those off with the Pasco puller.

So yes, it’s mostly compression stops and stainless steel braided supply tubes.

I agree with you about just shutting the water off rather than dealing with a crusty stop. But I’ve seen a lot of the plastic stem stops break off in such a way that they’re just spraying water everywhere.
Supply tubes soldered into the 3/8" compression connection on the stop? I guess if you're hurting for nuts and ferrules! Haha

You don't use a lever bender? You're hands must ache. I have bending springs but never use them. Nothing looks more proffesional than nicely bent chrome supplies.

I too would prefer drop ells and ips stops, but sweat stops are a good bit cheaper and require a plumber to change out, or at least someone who can solder well. I find the chrome extension stops to be the most difficult thing I solder on a regular basis.
 
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