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Anyone else use something different?

 

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I have a set made by Proto tools for 1/2 thru 1" nipples that I like a lot. I'll try to find and image of it. Anything over 1" I cape out.
 

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I have a set thats small enough to extract the allen set screw on a faucet.
 

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Cringe.

Hanging head.

Mine are from Harbor Freight.

Disgusting I know. Just never had that much use for them.

Well, I do have a good one in 1/2" & 3/4".
 

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My best set is made by Rector-Seal and is called Golden Grip and ranges from 1/2" to 2"and accepts a 1/2" ratchet drive.The thing is definitely a specialty tool set [at 200.00],and doesn't get a lot use .I have many other extractors of the spiral variety as well.
 

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I seldom use extractors for nipples. If I can't get the thing out with a wrench, I'll use a small saw blade and cut the thing through or nearly through, being very careful to not damage threads, then it will twist out.
 

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I seldom use extractors for nipples. If I can't get the thing out with a wrench, I'll use a small saw blade and cut the thing through or nearly through, being very careful to not damage threads, then it will twist out.
That is also known a caping, they make a special chisel for it that makes it even easier to remove, I do it often.
 

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Plumber Manhattan Beach
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you know,t he only time I try to extract anything is on a shower riser, when the shower arm breaks off inside.

usually does not work and I have to break either tile or drywall to get the new drop ear in.

I explain to the customer, that they should have had their shower arm changed 5 years ago:yes:


I own the same extractor, 1/2" and 3/4", and inside extractor, but I broke the 1/2" and don't use the others.
 

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That is also known a caping, they make a special chisel for it that makes it even easier to remove, I do it often.
The only place I have ever had to do this is with respect to the brass sweat adapter (not sure what this is really called) found on some old sweated brass traps. I know plenty of you have seen these but I rarely come across them. It is a brass ring, 1/4" i.d., threaded on the outside and sweat on the inside usually screwed into a c.i. tapped san tee. Killer you may still be installing these on a daily basis for all I know but it's not very often that I come across one. Every time I do I always hold out hope that I can simply screw it out which of course I never can. I always have to cut the brass which is easy enough and then pry it out with a screwdriver. It always takes longer than I think it should.
 

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The only place I have ever had to do this is with respect to the brass sweat adapter (not sure what this is really called) found on some old sweated brass traps. I know plenty of you have seen these but I rarely come across them. It is a brass ring, 1/4" i.d., threaded on the outside and sweat on the inside usually screwed into a c.i. tapped san tee. Killer you may still be installing these on a daily basis for all I know but it's not very often that I come across one. Every time I do I always hold out hope that I can simply screw it out which of course I never can. I always have to cut the brass which is easy enough and then pry it out with a screwdriver. It always takes longer than I think it should.
Those are called solder bushings, they aren't used anymore. You don't need to cut them to get them out, a cape chisel will do it no problem, without risking the threads on the fitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
We use them when replacing the galvinized nipple that the old time plumbers put in back then, the ones that stub out the wall and there is no room to lock the channels locks onto the end and you only see the threads.

It's all brass nipples that I use on the stubs.
 

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you know,t he only time I try to extract anything is on a shower riser, when the shower arm breaks off inside.

usually does not work and I have to break either tile or drywall to get the new drop ear in.

I explain to the customer, that they should have had their shower arm changed 5 years ago:yes:


I own the same extractor, 1/2" and 3/4", and inside extractor, but I broke the 1/2" and don't use the others.
Next time try a hack-saw blade and score in a few places and get close to the threads,it'll bend out.I've done hundreds.Especially useful technique when the 90 is not secured to the structure,and an extractor will tweak the riser.Or just remove some wallboard and or tile.:laughing:
 

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Plumber Manhattan Beach
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Next time try a hack-saw blade and score in a few places and get close to the threads,it'll bend out.I've done hundreds.Especially useful technique when the 90 is not secured to the structure,and an extractor will tweak the riser.Or just remove some wallboard and or tile.:laughing:

Yeah, I have been lucky on a few, scoring is time consuming, but I always give it a chance. the metal is real thin and sometimes I cut into the threads, if that happens, it's gotta come out,

my insurance company appreciates the fact that I get a paronoid over the chance of having a small leak in the wall for years....
 

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I was plumbing when you were 4 years old,so my technique may be a little more fine-tuned as far as extractions go.There was no such thing as sawzalls or dremel tools then.[well ,maybe corded sawzalls].
As far as length of time to do the procedure or any tedious procedure ,I always say to myself,"cinch by the inch,hard by the yard" and it helps keep things in perspective.
 

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I do have cape chisels and other strange ones that I use for similar tasks. Sometimes those shower arms have threads that are almost transparent they're so thin.

Yesterday, I had to remove an electric water heater element that wouldn't come loose. I use a big socket and breaker bar and it just slipped off. I've had to cut them out many times before and thought I had a pretty good system, but this one was tough. I had three holes drilled in it and was finally able to get a sawzall blade through the holes to cut several slashes near the threads. Eventually, I was able to knock off a piece and it came out. Not a scratch on the WH threads, which amazed even me. It was in tight quarters in a very small closet, too.
 

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I do have cape chisels and other strange ones that I use for similar tasks. Sometimes those shower arms have threads that are almost transparent they're so thin.

Yesterday, I had to remove an electric water heater element that wouldn't come loose. I use a big socket and breaker bar and it just slipped off. I've had to cut them out many times before and thought I had a pretty good system, but this one was tough. I had three holes drilled in it and was finally able to get a sawzall blade through the holes to cut several slashes near the threads. Eventually, I was able to knock off a piece and it came out. Not a scratch on the WH threads, which amazed even me. It was in tight quarters in a very small closet, too.
Yikes! Never had to do that. I would probably sell them a new water heater (or at least try) before I went to all that trouble. Problem is that how would you know it was in that condition before trying to remove it? Are you saying that the nut just rounded off? And why in the world do they make those so thin? This makes no sense at all to me.
 

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The ones I've seen look like this.

The one you posted reminds me of a "easy out" screw extractor, though I did come across it as a nipple extractor when I searched for this image.
 

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sawing and caping

score the busted nipple with a bare hacksaw blade and strike it with a hammer and a cape or diamond point chisel, the nipple will collapse and then become removable with a needle nose plier or similar tool. For sizes 1/2" and smaller, take the hacksaw blade to the bench grinder and lower its height profile by grinding off some of the blade to make it samll enough to enter the nipple; most capes are too large for small nipples, so a control screwdriver(flat type) or even an awl works best for second part of the task.

I should have been a baker or a teacher!
 
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