Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum banner
21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,634 Posts
I use smooth jawed channellocks as well
I like a regular pair with worn teeth. If you use a completely flat jaw you end up rounding corners off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
So all of this talk has gotten me all hot and bothered for a few more knipex, which I could use. I might have gotten lucky with my original sets, just guessing on what I needed, and in one case just relied on a specific recommendation.
For those of you enlightened few who share my fetish, which models do you like? Having a hard time distinguishing between so many models that all look alike and have the exact same descriptions on the website.
I like the 3 piece set of alligator pliers for teeth. The 3 piece set of pliers wrenches, the silver ones. I typically only have the large and small of the three piece set on the truck. I don’t use the medium size much. I do in the pliers wrench though. I have the micro pliers wrench and it’s small enough to turn under a kitchen faucet when a basin wrench won’t fit. It’s worth it’s weight in gold when you need it. The pliers wrench isn’t your standard smooth jaw adjustable. It has numerous adjustments with the quick slide and will adjust to that perfect size where your hand is at the right squeeze(you plumbers know what I’m saying). It also has a cam lever design where your applying much more squeeze on the fitting so it doesn’t slip.

The small alligator pliers prob have made me more money than any tool I own. I typically always have a pair in my pocket while working. I remember one time helping a Buddy get a stripped oil drain plug out. It was recessed where no other pliers could get on it or bite into the bolt. Tried the little alligator pliers and it fit and didn’t slip.
I would recommend getting two of the alligator set. The newest versions have larger jaw capacity in all 3 of them. You should try a set of linesman pliers from them. They are incredible. Chadstoolbox is the best place price wise to get them.
Channellock is such an inferior plier compared to Knipex. It’s like saying a Mustang is as good as a Ferrari. Both get the job done but they are not in the same league.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,634 Posts
..........I have the micro pliers wrench and it’s small enough to turn under a kitchen faucet when a basin wrench won’t fit. It’s worth it’s weight in gold when you need it. ..............

.....
Channellock is such an inferior plier compared to Knipex. It’s like saying a Mustang is as good as a Ferrari. Both get the job done but they are not in the same league.
I always carry two pairs of 6" pliers in my pockets. Used to be channellocks but back when walmart started selling them they switched to cheaper steel and got thicker. I buy the old good channellocks when I can find them.

About a year ago I bought a pair of Klein 6" pliers and they are miles ahead of even the old channellocks. The teeth have stayed very sharp, the action doesn't lock up, and the handles are more comfortable. They also open a bit larger than most 6" pliers. I've grown to regret using my 6" channellocks when I need to use both.

Carpet sweeper Font Electronic device Audio equipment Measuring instrument
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
If one of my guys left channel lock jaw marks in a chrome nut, particularly on a commercial flush valve, I’d throw them off of the job. There is no excuse for that. Having the right tool for the job is part of being a professional.

We use adjustable wrenches on finish, especially angle stop bodies and compression nuts. In this case, I personally feel that the adjustable is well suited to the task. If you are rounding off nuts with an adjustable wrench, you are using it wrong or it’s a crap quality wrench (this includes over torquing- adjustable wrenches were never designed to take as much torque as an open end).

I also like to use open end and box wrenches for supply tubes. I really like the stubby combination wrenches- the 5/8 stubby is perfect in a tight spot and will get the 1/2 but plenty tight.

We use spud wrenches (usually offset) when we need them. Not any type of pliers. Not everyone has one, but if you are setting finish, you better have one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,791 Posts
If one of my guys left channel lock jaw marks in a chrome nut, particularly on a commercial flush valve, I’d throw them off of the job. There is no excuse for that. Having the right tool for the job is part of being a professional.

We use adjustable wrenches on finish, especially angle stop bodies and compression nuts. In this case, I personally feel that the adjustable is well suited to the task. If you are rounding off nuts with an adjustable wrench, you are using it wrong or it’s a crap quality wrench (this includes over torquing- adjustable wrenches were never designed to take as much torque as an open end).

I also like to use open end and box wrenches for supply tubes. I really like the stubby combination wrenches- the 5/8 stubby is perfect in a tight spot and will get the 1/2 but plenty tight.

We use spud wrenches (usually offset) when we need them. Not any type of pliers. Not everyone has one, but if you are setting finish, you better have one.
I use smooth jawed channellocks on chrome flush valve toilets and urinals,never scratches them and always works
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
I never use channel locks or Knipex pliers much anymore. I use the Ridgid Hex wrenches, Proto adjustable, flare wrenches, combination wrenches etc for most stuff that is smooth. Squeezing pliers too much is murder on your hands. Pipe gets Pipe wrenches, I got all sizes of standard Ridgid pipe wrenches aswell a bunch of the Knipex Swedish Pattern styles. I still use pliers, just not too much. I sleep better now, don't have numb hands all night and day from squeezing pliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,634 Posts
...........If you are rounding off nuts with an adjustable wrench, you are using it wrong or it’s a crap quality wrench (this includes over torquing- adjustable wrenches were never designed to take as much torque as an open end).
.............
I was referring to disassembling. You don't get to decide how much torque it takes to disassemble ;)
 
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top