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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a customer who has a leak from the exposed lead water service in the basement. Wiping a new joint is not an option but am considering the use of a Lead-Loc fitting to make the transition to copper.
Has any one had any experience with this type of fitting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's the coupling Iwas thinking of but couldn't remember the name:blink:. To much pvc glue over the years. Thanks.
 

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make sure you restrain it from thrusting. can you do a bit joint? wipeing copper right into the lead? we call those ford fittings dresser couplings here
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's prolly been 20 years since I wiped a joint and even then I wasn't that good at it. My feeling was that if I could get by with the coupling, re-round and file, and prevent compression failure, it would be one and done.

I don't want to risk losing the small portion of pipe that I have to work with:no:

Thanks for the responses.
 

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around here we can only buy couplings in straight sizes, so you might have to buy two diffrent couplings for transition to copper and just steal the washer out of one to put in one side of the other. and oh yea don't forget to restrain it from thrusting.
 

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The Old (antique) Master
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I have a customer who has a leak from the exposed lead water service in the basement. Wiping a new joint is not an option but am considering the use of a Lead-Loc fitting to make the transition to copper.
Has any one had any experience with this type of fitting.
Lead Piping ... The photo below shows Athode Unions ... A method of joining lead from years ago which did not require wiping.

The right hand part is for lead drainage to IP 1-1/2" both ends. The left hand part of the photo is for 5/8" lead to 3/4 IP.

To use you slipped the end with the nut over the lead, then with a turn pin you flared the lead out, then with a ballpeen hammer you flattened the lead against the flange, then you took a rasp and filed the excess lead to the diameter of the fitting. Finally you coupled to the other end, the lead you hammed flat became the gasket and the pressure caused by tightening the nut created the seal.

Enjoy the way of the past. Yep I still have a couple of them.
 

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I get nervous messing with lead that old. We have homes here that have lead services, and usually there is not much protruding through the wall.

Maybe you better send Bill a plane ticket, and tell him to bring some of those fittings!:yes:
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It would be nice to sell a new water service $$$$$ but most of the towns here that have homes with lead service treat there water.

Supposedly this "treatment" prevents the leaching of lead into the potable water. Kinda hard to sell a new service when the town tells the client that the piping is safe.

The lines we have dug up,believe it or not, are still in perfect condition.
 
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