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Good to know. Problem is: it was a yellow one.

I guess I could have replaced the canister, but it was a Sunday and I needed to get it done.

So, here’s the question, do you all keep a canister on the truck?

IMO the business cost of the job goes way up if I have to go to the supply house in the middle of a small job like this one. And you can’t really charge more -I guess you can; but you’ve got to bury it somewhere.

I don’t do a lot of service, but I most certainly keep a stock of parts around for stuff like this.
You can use a 2" flapper flush valve to replace the canister. I keep two 2" flapper flush valves on the van. We are a Kohler dealer and have sold thousands of these toilets, but I have had no need to carry the canisters on the van as of yet. Maybe in 5 or 10 more years. I've only had two locations need new flush cans due to breakage. One has extremely acidic water and the other was broken by a Grandchild.

I did have one house with terrible water, the canister didn't break but would constantly get mineral buildup, I swapped that out for a 2" flapper flush valve.

I also keep one or two 3" flapper flush valves on the van. Frankly a simple, single flapper assembly seems to be the best mechanism, whether that's 2" or 3".
 

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Good to know. Problem is: it was a yellow one.

I guess I could have replaced the canister, but it was a Sunday and I needed to get it done.

So, here’s the question, do you all keep a canister on the truck?

IMO the business cost of the job goes way up if I have to go to the supply house in the middle of a small job like this one. And you can’t really charge more -I guess you can; but you’ve got to bury it somewhere.

I don’t do a lot of service, but I most certainly keep a stock of parts around for stuff like this.
Those Kohler toilets with the flush canister are fairly popular around here, I think I've had to replace one or two of the canisters or flush valves because the plastic cracked somewhere. Both times it was recently after someone worked on it, so I'm not convinced it was anything wrong with the flush valve, more than likely a plumber who got a little rammy with it. I have seen those yellow rings get gummy and cause the canister to stick much like a Mansfield, so more than likely replacing the flush valve ring would have fixed the problem. I prefer a straightforward flapper to all the other silly designs, but I don't think I've ever swapped out a flush canister style flush valve for a flapper style. Flush valves usually don't just break, and by the time they do the toilet is usually due for replacement, or at the very least it makes more sense cash wise to replace the toilet than to try and replace the flush valve on something that old.
 

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I don’t think so. The water was splashing up the sides of the canister. And the hose wasn’t connected when I got there.
Ever turn the water back on to a toilet with that hose disconnected? Especially if the home has high pressure? That hose pops up and sprays the wall to ceiling... pretty sure you replaced the cylinder for no reason. It does the same with the lid on and it can spray out of the tank or cause the water splash

You should have checked the psi. Replaced or installed a new prv and replaced the over flow hose for free. Just Saiyan.
 

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Flush valves usually don't just break, and by the time they do the toilet is usually due for replacement, or at the very least it makes more sense cash wise to replace the toilet than to try and replace the flush valve on something that old.
I'm glad someone finally said that. I hate waste and planned obscellesence as much as anyone, but I've talked a couple of people into replacing the toilet instead of paying for my time to disassemble the tank from the bowl and replace that damn Kohler cannister valve.
 

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My sister in law has a Kohler canister that is 3” and if you try to put a 3” regular flushvalve in it the tank to bowl gasket will not seal……

If you install a regular 3” tank to bowl gasket it’ll leak……if you install the kohler tank to bowl gasket it doesn’t fit over the new flushvalve, it’s not deep enough.

At that point I installed a new canister and slammed the door on the way out……

It’s a total POS
 

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I use sharkbite caps on new construction all the time lolololo

That may come back to bite you in the face really hard.

Another plumber related a story to me; he said: He knows a plumber who did a 2nd rough and used sharkbite caps on his 1/2" copper stub outs. When the cabinet men came they installed high-quality cabinets with beefy backing not the flimsy garbage backing on cheap cabinets. Well while the cabinet men were wiggling the new cabinet in and out, they inadvertently pulled off a sharkbite cap causing a flood. With a well-made cabinet that has a decent wood backing, if the hole drilled out for the copper stub-out is just a little larger than the SB cap, wiggling the cabinet into place and moving it to shim it can dis-lodge the SB cap. Now you have a flood and you {the plumber} are not even on site.

I will not use SB caps in that application. I will use them if I cut out a W/H and have to return at a later date with the new W/H. I will use 3/4" SB caps on the copper stub-outs since I am relatively sure that no one will be messing with them.
 

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That may come back to bite you in the face really hard.

Another plumber related a story to me; he said: He knows a plumber who did a 2nd rough and used sharkbite caps on his 1/2" copper stub outs. When the cabinet men came they installed high-quality cabinets with beefy backing not the flimsy garbage backing on cheap cabinets. Well while the cabinet men were wiggling the new cabinet in and out, they inadvertently pulled off a sharkbite cap causing a flood. With a well-made cabinet that has a decent wood backing, if the hole drilled out for the copper stub-out is just a little larger than the SB cap, wiggling the cabinet into place and moving it to shim it can dis-lodge the SB cap. Now you have a flood and you {the plumber} are not even on site.

I will not use SB caps in that application. I will use them if I cut out a W/H and have to return at a later date with the new W/H. I will use 3/4" SB caps on the copper stub-outs since I am relatively sure that no one will be messing with them.
If the cabinet guy told the truth he would be liable for that.

But I agree with what you’re saying, it can and has been a point of failure. John guest fittings have a locking clip you can install on their pushfit.

Good post Tommy, you always come up with stuff that happens and no one talks about.
 

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That may come back to bite you in the face really hard.

Another plumber related a story to me; he said: He knows a plumber who did a 2nd rough and used sharkbite caps on his 1/2" copper stub outs. When the cabinet men came they installed high-quality cabinets with beefy backing not the flimsy garbage backing on cheap cabinets. Well while the cabinet men were wiggling the new cabinet in and out, they inadvertently pulled off a sharkbite cap causing a flood. With a well-made cabinet that has a decent wood backing, if the hole drilled out for the copper stub-out is just a little larger than the SB cap, wiggling the cabinet into place and moving it to shim it can dis-lodge the SB cap. Now you have a flood and you {the plumber} are not even on site.
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Good post Tommy, you always come up with stuff that happens and no one talks about.
A few years back I posted about a house we were renovating, second floor master bath got sharkbites on the stubouts, that's what most of our newcon guys were doing at the time. Drywall guys had to refit a panel multiple times and loosened a sharkbite cap. It blew off later that night, luckily it wasn't a friday. $5,000 worth of damage. Boss banned sharkbites after that. We chucked or sold the rest we had including a couple sharkbite kits with a couple hundred fittings. Just not worth it. Now our stub outs just get propress caps.

We use all copper stubouts. What surprises me is that the guys who run pex and don't want to solder don't use IP stubs with a drop ell. No soldering and it's easily replaced. Drives me nuts when they just stubout pex :mad:
 
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A few years back I posted about a house we were renovating, second floor master bath got sharkbites on the stubouts, that's what most of our newcon guys were doing at the time. Drywall guys had to refit a panel multiple times and loosened a sharkbite cap. It blew off later that night, luckily it wasn't a friday. $5,000 worth of damage. Boss banned sharkbites after that. We chucked or sold the rest we had including a couple sharkbite kits with a couple hundred fittings. Just not worth it. Now our stub outs just get propress caps.

We use all copper stubouts. What surprises me is that the guys who run pex and don't want to solder don't use IP stubs with a drop ell. No soldering and it's easily replaced. Drives me nuts when they just stubout pex :mad:
What’s the big deal about stubbing out PeX ?
 

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We use all copper stubouts. What surprises me is that the guys who run pex and don't want to solder don't use IP stubs with a drop ell. No soldering and it's easily replaced. Drives me nuts when they just stubout pex :mad:
All pex stub outs here even in million dollar homes, looks cheap!
 
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