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I just saw the video demo of one. Has anyone used one? Has anyone used one on PVC?


I really like the idea of being able to functionally cut plastic waste lines with out having to deburr and also having a bevel cut on the end (per our discussion the other day about the Reed bevel/ deburr tools).
That definitely looks nice. Says it's pipe up to 50mm, if that's the OD it won't fit our 2".

Makes me wonder about putting a bit like that on a standard pipe cutter. I use my pipe cutter for 1-1/2" solid pvc but it leaves a lip, it's great for ferncos, no-hubs, and compression check valves. On foam core a standard cutter doesn't leave a lip. I often use my Wheeler-Rex 4992 to cut trap arms under kitchen sinks for snaking/jetting. But I almost always use a no-hub there.

I have a larger lenox pipe cutter that has a slightly messed up cutter wheel mount. One of the guys chucked it out, barely used. It cuts a thread if you're not careful. It's the perfect candidate for this modification. It does up to 2".
 

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Well now that I know it doesn't do what I dreamt it would I really want to make that dream a reality. I have some tool steel bits from some old lathe tools, they'd probably work.
 
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I’ve used it. We seem to always have the sawzall out at trim and it does tubular just fine.
Seems like another too specific tool in an already heavy bag.
Exactly.

I use my regular pipe cutter for tubular. Almost always cuts perfect, when it doesn't cut through you then have a good score line and can just use a razor blade.
 

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I’ve used it. We seem to always have the sawzall out at trim and it does tubular just fine.
Seems like another too specific tool in an already heavy bag.
Exactly.

I use my regular pipe cutter for tubular. Almost always cuts perfect, when it doesn't cut through you then have a good score line and can just use a razor blade.
I have one and I prefer it to the saw. Much quieter and no crumbs to clean up. I also find I use it far more than my ratcheting pipe shears. As for the weight, I have a general tools bag with channellocks, wrenches, screwdrivers, etc, and another with specialty tools that I grab as needed based on the job notes.

No sense carrying a heavy tool bag at all.
 

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I have one and I prefer it to the saw. Much quieter and no crumbs to clean up. I also find I use it far more than my ratcheting pipe shears. As for the weight, I have a general tools bag with channellocks, wrenches, screwdrivers, etc, and another with specialty tools that I grab as needed based on the job notes.

No sense carrying a heavy tool bag at all.
My specialty toolbag is overflowing. My van is constantly at the weight limit and I have very little extra room. Something like that plastic tube cutter would get unused and possibly crushed.

I need some time to organize my van, it's been a while. When the weather gets warm I'll need to pull everything out.
 

· I Like Tater Tots
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I have the ridged version. Once you cut tubular with it you will never do it a different way again. Literally 1 1/2 - 2 turns no mess and clean chamfer.
 

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I was just looking at the Ridgid. Now I’m having second thoughts.

I’m not into marking my tubular and it looks like you must look through a viewing window in order to line up your cut. So the cut line has to be marked some way,

that’s an extra step I really don’t need to do other than the design of Ridgid tool.
 

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I was just looking at the Ridgid. Now I’m having second thoughts.

I’m not into marking my tubular and it looks like you must look through a viewing window in order to line up your cut. So the cut line has to be marked some way,

that’s an extra step I really don’t need to do other than the design of Ridgid tool.
I just "mark it" with my thumb. Slip joint tubular is usually pretty forgiving.
 

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have you looked at the Ridgid cutter I’m talking about ?

You can’t mark it with your thumb or you’ll lose your cut when you put it in the 1.25 section to cut it.

I cut all my tubular exact. No play, full make up. Everytime.
The Ridgid PTEC tubular drain cutter? This One? Owned one for years, in fact I'm on my second one. If I lost it tomorrow I would pick up a new one on the way home.

It's like a ¼ inch from the side of the tool to the cut line. Just hold the cutter at the end of your thumb and give it a nudge when you take your thumb off. You're the first plumber I've talked to that cared that much about how their plastic tubular was cut. But hey, if it works for you, go for it.
 

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The Ridgid PTEC tubular drain cutter? This One? Owned one for years, in fact I'm on my second one. If I lost it tomorrow I would pick up a new one on the way home.

It's like a ¼ inch from the side of the tool to the cut line. Just hold the cutter at the end of your thumb and give it a nudge when you take your thumb off. You're the first plumber I've talked to that cared that much about how their plastic tubular was cut. But hey, if it works for you, go for it.
Yeah, I like to cut my tubing exact. I don’t like to ever guess at the cut line and I don’t want to have to mark it because of the tools design. Not with tubular plastics anyway.

I think I’ll stick to using the Ridgid pex cutters. Spin it a few times then squeeze and it cuts great, or use my m12 mini sawzall with a fine tooth blade.
Font Automotive exterior Tool Bumper Auto part
 

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I'll bet. I've seen your posts about tools you own. I'd say you're a glutton for specialty tools. 😆
My van's not as bad as it was years ago, I've had to lean it out AND find room for more diverse things. It used to be we were told to limit what we stocked for repair parts. Take pictures and order what was needed for a return trip. If I ordered a stem for my van the parts person would ask permission from a manager before ordering it. Our shop Sloan kit was well stocked and none of us had Sloan parts on the vans. Maybe a half dozen shower valve cartridges. It was brutal. I hated subjecting customers to a second, unnecessary trip for a Moen 1200 or a Symmons TA-10. Motto was "get eyes on it" and figure out what we need to come back.

A couple years ago we lost our two other good service guys leaving only me. Calls went up due to covid and the urban flight. The new guys they pulled off newcon were dysmal. This left me being sent to all sorts of situations where we didn't know what I'd find, and we didn't want a second trip because we were so strapped for man hours. I am now our only real service plumber and have been for quite some time. The past several years I have been able to order ANYTHING. A couple weeks ago I ordered a Wal-Rich spud buddy mostly just to see if I could! It was special order and they had it delivered 2 day shipping without even asking me!

Since things changed I stock pretty much everything. I go through the van regularly looking for overstock and tools I don't use. I keep softener parts, Sloan parts, several sump pumps, all sorts of well pump parts like checks, ccvs, foot valves, control boxes, insert fittings, sweat fittings for pressure up to 1-1/4", a few 1-1/2" copper dwv parts, 5 float switches(instead of 2), electrical parts like jboxes, switches, romex, bx. And all of that is on top of the usual pipe and fittings I carried before and all of the snaking equipment.
 
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