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I personally cant stand flex lines. Seen to many with worn out washers. I have replaced many with the wrong kind of nipples in them too. I always hook up mine with hard pipe and d-electric unions. Takes more time for sure, but much better and longer lasting job. I will admit I have been to a few jobs were flex lines were the way to go. Them in and out kind of jobs:laughing:
 

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We use flex lines all the time, don't seem to have a problem with them myself.
 

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hard pipe w/ dielectric unions, and ballvalves on hot and cold. the flex lines seem to work just fine. and are required in seismic regions ive been told. makes sense. pipe for your region.
 

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Always Something
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Flex lines...mostly Brasscraft or Bobs....sometimes SS.
However I hate....with a passion Dielectric unions. I refuse to install them. If I need a union it's always brass. Tripple the price, I know but they don't rust shut in 5 years either.
 

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Chase Plumber
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Ball valves on hot and cold? Hopefully the ball valve behind the bladder tank, lol.

I always just installed a gate valve on the cold side coming in, behind the bladder tank.

But anywho, hard pipe all the way!
 

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Ball valves on hot and cold? Hopefully the ball valve behind the bladder tank, lol.

I always just installed a gate valve on the cold side coming in, behind the bladder tank.

But anywho, hard pipe all the way!
the twin ballvalves make for a quick replacement of the wh the next time no draindown time on the hot. yeah it might be 10 years later, but the next plumber will thank me. or i may thank myself.
 

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Plumber Manhattan Beach
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flex all mine, unless it is a 75 gallon and up. Flex lets it move when the shaker comes......

When I hard pipe, I use all brass to transition to `copper, I have seen so many dielectrics fail, rust and leak. Brass unions and nipples, or brass to copper unions, or bell reducers and nipples, then copper fip's.

you get the point. good to have flex out here.
 

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flex all mine, unless it is a 75 gallon and up. Flex lets it move when the shaker comes......

When I hard pipe, I use all brass to transition to `copper, I have seen so many dielectrics fail, rust and leak. Brass unions and nipples, or brass to copper unions, or bell reducers and nipples, then copper fip's.

you get the point. good to have flex out here.
ive seen dielectrics close shut w/ almost 0 pressure, brought it to the attention of the plbg commission yet its still code here to have them. climate controlled engineers and lawyers. but then again i might suck at thier job too.
 

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I hard pipe but have considered using flex when possible. You could not make me use a gate valve,ball valve only. The gate valve is the worst valve on the market. Two ball valves is over kill you still have to remove the air from the new tank.
 

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new nickname:Quaker State
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Does yalls jurisdiction require you to use heat loops? Here we have to have a loop in the hot and cold at least 6 above from where you tie in to the water heater. A longer flex line makes that easier. Used to have to use 90's when working for this one company years ago. I found like I said, that flex connectors can do the same thing and faster. Passes code.
 

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every tool is a hammer
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Two ball valves have nothing to do with purging a tank, it keeps the hot water from flooding your work area. Also, a lot of commercial tanks have recircs, and if there is crossover from a faucet anywhere, you get blasted. I just had to add a 1-1/4" valve on the hot outlet of a 100 gallon heater at a school, yesterday.
 

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Had to put my first heat loop on a water heater for a homeowner that built this new house. He said it was to conserve energy, by not loosing heat out of the water heater when not being used. First time I really heard of this, but no big deal as far as install, just a few more 90's. Also was wondering how many put on expansion tanks on new installs?
 

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I hard pipe but have considered using flex when possible. You could not make me use a gate valve,ball valve only. The gate valve is the worst valve on the market. Two ball valves is over kill you still have to remove the air from the new tank.
How do you figure ball valves are better than a gate valve. What is so terrific about a ball valve.

1) You cannot repair a ball valve without removing the valve from the pipe.

2) Even if you had parts for a ball valve it would be easier to replace the entire valve and this require draining the entire system, getting out a dozen tools and about one hour.

3) Ball valves ride on a Nylon seat. The seats crack and the valve leaks.

4) The brass ball erodes and the valve leaks.

6) The stems leak and you cannot re-pack nor tighten the valve.

7) When a ball valve has a tiny leak you cannot crank it off tighter.


The problem is; you never use a NIBCO gate valve with a non-rising stem. My boss said he has been using these valves for 50 years and never had one stem break and never saw any corrosion of the body of a valve.

Great thing about the NIBCO gate valve. You can change the stem in 30 seconds and the valve lasts forever.

Another hated valve is the quarter-turn angles stops. These valves are garbage and we see many of the angle stops will not turn completely off within six month.

Sorry, but this is what you can expect from the sorry ball valve and this is what you can expect a NIBCO gate valve to look like in 50 years. I removed this valve because; it would not turn completely off. the stem was leaking, and the body has holes corroding through it. Which valve is more serviceable?

Sorry, I just hate it when I see every plumber pushing ball valves and I spend many hours every year changing them and never had to change a gate valve.
 

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Di-electric unions are worse than flexes

I personally cant stand flex lines. Seen to many with worn out washers. I have replaced many with the wrong kind of nipples in them too. I always hook up mine with hard pipe and d-electric unions. Takes more time for sure, but much better and longer lasting job. I will admit I have been to a few jobs were flex lines were the way to go. Them in and out kind of jobs:laughing:
When you use stainless steel flexes you can remove and screw on new flexes in about 4 minutes.

I have never seen it possible to change a water heater, with di-electric unions and be able to use the same unions. They are always corroded and you have to pull out all your tools and spend another 20 to 30 minutes.

I have never seen water flex washers leak. Of course, what do I know because I am only 18 year old, but from my little experience I have seen the very end of the copper connector corrode. This is the part the rubber washer sits on, so it appears that the rubber is leaking.
 

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After our last big earthquake every water heater I had with broken water or gas lines were piped in flex with the exception of one 75-gallon heater. I pipe all my water heaters with brass C X MIP Unions.

Mark
 

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Why was the flex the problem?

After our last big earthquake every water heater I had with broken water or gas lines were piped in flex with the exception of one 75-gallon heater. I pipe all my water heaters with brass C X MIP Unions.

Mark
I would think the earthquake bracket was not installed at all or was not installed the correct way. Of course, we don't have your shake n' bake problems in Baton Rouge. I would also think that I would rather have a properly strapped water heater with a flexible gas pipe in an earthquake rather than taking a chance that the shaking would snap a joint. I can't see how a di-electric union could hold up better in a shaker than a flex. My boss said he has not used a di-electric union in over 50 years. If necessary, we install a solid brass union and attach brass nipples to the water heater.

I want to go to California and experience an earthquake. In Baton Rouge we call a shopping mall a poor man's Disney Land. We take our kids up and down the escalators and elevators several times and we don't need any E Tickets. Of course, E tickets were gone long before I was a sperm.

When was your last quake?
 

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I would think the earthquake bracket was not installed at all or was not installed the correct way. Of course, we don't have your shake n' bake problems in Baton Rouge. I would also think that I would rather have a properly strapped water heater with a flexible gas pipe in an earthquake rather than taking a chance that the shaking would snap a joint. I can't see how a di-electric union could hold up better in a shaker than a flex. My boss said he has not used a di-electric union in over 50 years. If necessary, we install a solid brass union and attach brass nipples to the water heater.

I want to go to California and experience an earthquake. In Baton Rouge we call a shopping mall a poor man's Disney Land. We take our kids up and down the escalators and elevators several times and we don't need any E Tickets. Of course, E tickets were gone long before I was a sperm.
The original code said we only needed to install earthquake straps on water heaters piped in flexes. The reason they changed the code was because repair plumbers were adding flexes when they did a change out and not adding the strap. After the Northridge earthquake we replaced hundreds of flexes and/or water heaters on properties where the heaters were piped in flexes and had one piece of 1" copper snap on a 75-gallon heater. Even at that, while the pipe snapped the water heater was still standing. It is the flexes which allows the water heater to move enough to need an earthquake strap.

Mark
 

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Are earthquakes good for business?

We have a team that follows disasters in several states. The problem we encounter is it is difficult to get decisions because the customer does not know if FEMA will pay, their insurance company will pay, or they will have to foot the money themselves. I imagine just after an earthquake thousands of broken water mains, broken gas pipes, flooded homes, and nobody wants to commit to be the responsible party to pay the bill. Did you have this problem?
 
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