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I know we are from all over the country but let me say it was hot!!! today at work. 105 in Louisiana is HOT!! Drank plenty of water and lost 5lbs. My welder is older and I have to watch over him when it gets this hot because he will go for awhile without drinking any water. He always says I am nagging him but Im not just looking out for him.... Thats what the foreman should do.
 

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I came out of NC once, got a call from a friend who had to get the ground work in before they pored concrete. I told him I would do it. We had been experiencing 110 degree heat (Without humidity factored in). I got to the place and there was those pre cast concrete walls setting on pete gravel. No windows, only one door. It was about 120 degrees in that hole. Took almost 5 hours to set a 4" sch40 line about 20 feet long with a toilet stub, and a sink stub, second floor stub, and a 10 foot stub for the water test. Should had been maybe 2 hours most. just could not work but maybe 15 minutes and you stopped sweating. Run out and get some water, cool down, do it again.
 

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I know what you mean. Back in my new construction days I dreaded the summer. Rough ins on a wide open lot with no shade will seperate the boys from the girls down here!
 

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You all got it bad out there, were lucky here in the NW
 

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Very seldom do we hit 100, check area code 97402 on weatherchannel.com, you will want to move here afterwards.
 

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I give each one of our journeymen a camelback water "jug". It's got the hose that comes around front. They pay for themselves by the time you figure 6 guys taking 20 minutes to take the long way to the fountain while visiting with the other trades.
 

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It's supposed to be 106 today before the heat index today.I'm guessing we'll have 20-30 days this year over 100.I'll gladly trade heat for cold ,meaning screw the cold,that's why I've stayed away from Chicago.
 

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It's supposed to be 106 today before the heat index today.I'm guessing we'll have 20-30 days this year over 100.I'll gladly trade heat for cold ,meaning screw the cold,that's why I've stayed away from Chicago.

Been there. Talk about c-o-l-d?
never again.
 

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Like rain we get it here and plenty of it, we don't get the see the sun that much in late fall to mid spring, and the fog, oh yea it tends to stay awhile, thanks to living only 60 miles form the ocean.
 

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Something that works is called cool vest. They have gel packs in them and are made of lightweight cotton. Dunk it in water and the evaporation cools you down. The hottest attic I was ever in was about 140sh. When I was in the desert, we could leave a handprint in our hard hats. Also get a camelback.
 

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Here are some heat beating tricks from Fla.

If your roughing in: Get a "Texas cool vest" keep spare cool packs in the ice chest, polarized shades, and a good hat(cow boy, booney, sombrero). Drink lots of water AND Gatorade.

If repiping in an attic: start the job early (6 AM) immediately cut the main and install a prefabed Dressler manifold with sprinklers on the roof. Keep mesh and mastic on the repipe trucks. If the ducts in the attic are fiberglass, cut out a 1'x1' hole in a supply and return. Crank the thermostat down and tell the HO to keep his/her hands off of it. The attic will stay cool. When done, patch the holes in the duct. I know it seems like a lot of work, but if it's a large house the 15 minutes you spent doing this will save cut your attic time bye at least an hour. You'll notice you tend to keep helpers longer too.

If you’re going to be in one location for a while (working on a well, lift station, large pipe repair) invest in some large shade umbrellas that can be staked into the ground and are bendable. When the humidity is low (which is never in Fla) box fans or swamp fans keep productivity high.
 

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Here are some heat beating tricks from Fla.

If your roughing in: Get a "Texas cool vest" keep spare cool packs in the ice chest, polarized shades, and a good hat(cow boy, booney, sombrero). Drink lots of water AND Gatorade.

If repiping in an attic: start the job early (6 AM) immediately cut the main and install a prefabed Dressler manifold with sprinklers on the roof. Keep mesh and mastic on the repipe trucks. If the ducts in the attic are fiberglass, cut out a 1'x1' hole in a supply and return. Crank the thermostat down and tell the HO to keep his/her hands off of it. The attic will stay cool. When done, patch the holes in the duct. I know it seems like a lot of work, but if it's a large house the 15 minutes you spent doing this will save cut your attic time bye at least an hour. You'll notice you tend to keep helpers longer too.

If you’re going to be in one location for a while (working on a well, lift station, large pipe repair) invest in some large shade umbrellas that can be staked into the ground and are bendable. When the humidity is low (which is never in Fla) box fans or swamp fans keep productivity high.
thanks protech.

i can use some of your teachings up here.

even though we only get up to about +86 F (+30 C) here, it feels very hot to us.

i did a job in yellowknife on a hotel steam heating line. if memory serves me right, the line was about 250 F. we had to remove a 24" 90 and install a blind flange.

up the scaffolding for ten minutes work. down to the floor for 15 minutes cool down and re-hydrate.

i never really cared for steam fitting.:laughing:

Vince

i seen people suffer heat stroke, not nice
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
thanks protech.

i can use some of your teachings up here.

even though we only get up to about +86 F (+30 C) here, it feels very hot to us.

i did a job in yellowknife on a hotel steam heating line. if memory serves me right, the line was about 250 F. we had to remove a 24" 90 and install a blind flange.

up the scaffolding for ten minutes work. down to the floor for 15 minutes cool down and re-hydrate.

i never really cared for steam fitting.:laughing:

Vince

i seen people suffer heat stroke, not nice
Four 8" steam valves on top of two boilers. Two for each boiler. One off the header and the other off the boiler itself. Temp reading before we shut down was well over 290 degrees. Once we were able to go to work in was right at 200. Longest night of my life. Not to mention they were well over 200 lbs a piece.
 

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Steam tracing live production lines at Suncor in Fort McMurray (bitumen lines). 325 to 480 degrees f if memory serves. We had to wear proximity suits. It was very much below freezing outside but snow would not get anywhere near this place. We tried the cool vests etc, they would dry up just as fast as we would walk up to the job. By the end of 4 weeks everyone was aclimated to the heat but holy crap was it hot!
 
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