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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a grease line melt in a crawlspace a couple of days ago. The line was repalced with sh.40 from cast iron because they were having some serious problems with grease build-up. The temp on the heat trace was 140 degrees. Way too hot imo and it showed because it melted. If this thing stops back up is there a heat trace that we can run that has a thermastat so we can regulate the temp. so this wont occur again? FYI the thing broke loose a few monthes back and they were having problems with an awful smell throughout the building. I found the problem Monday night and pumped grease and food out for 7 hours Tuesday and made the repair on the line. It was horrible.....
 

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Had a grease line melt in a crawlspace a couple of days ago. The line was repalced with sh.40 from cast iron because they were having some serious problems with grease build-up. The temp on the heat trace was 140 degrees. Way too hot imo and it showed because it melted. If this thing stops back up is there a heat trace that we can run that has a thermastat so we can regulate the temp. so this wont occur again? FYI the thing broke loose a few monthes back and they were having problems with an awful smell throughout the building. I found the problem Monday night and pumped grease and food out for 7 hours Tuesday and made the repair on the line. It was horrible.....

It really has more to do with how many watts per foot the heat trace is. It sounds like they may have installed a self regulating hot water maintaining heat trace which is meant to keep water at 125 degrees. I would look into maybe a 3 watt per foot frost protection heat trace.

Mark
 

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I remember in New York state they only allow copper and cast-iron for kitchen drains because of hot water. Seems like a smart thing to me, especially after I have seen commercial kitchen drain lines run in pvc get all melted and saggy. I prefer copper drains as they are slicker and less likely to clog up than cast-iron.
 

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I remember in New York state they only allow copper and cast-iron for kitchen drains because of hot water. Seems like a smart thing to me, especially after I have seen commercial kitchen drain lines run in pvc get all melted and saggy. I prefer copper drains as they are slicker and less likely to clog up than cast-iron.
PVC should not be used in temperatures above 140 degrees but even more of a concern in a commercial kitchen is the chemicals will cause the system to melt.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It really has more to do with how many watts per foot the heat trace is. It sounds like they may have installed a self regulating hot water maintaining heat trace which is meant to keep water at 125 degrees. I would look into maybe a 3 watt per foot frost protection heat trace.

Mark
Thats was what I was thinking. 140 is way too hot.
 
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