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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone heard of glycol causing leaks at threaded joints due to breaking down the thread compound? We did a short piping to mri machine from chillers and 10 months later they say they have leaks at the threadsby the flow meter. We go back and forth between tape and compound --maybe just one of those things that didnt make it to warranty end--I dont know.
 

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Glycol is a funny substance. It can find leakpaths that 100% water can't. It has something to do with the glycol's surface tension from what I've been reading. There have been threads documenting the leeching of glycol through propress joints as well as conventional threaded joints.

I'm not sure of glycol's ability to break down joint compound...never gave is a second thought....I'm interested to see the responses of anyone experiencing it.

By nature, glycol is not really friendly to hydronic systems. It effectively "undersizes" circulators because it's thicker than water and increases the head loss of the entire system. Rate of heat transfer is reduced as well, compromising the efficiency of the heating plant.

Try searching some of the heating forums as well as listening to the people here...you're bound to findan answer:thumbsup:
 

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Glycol is a funny substance. It can find leakpaths that 100% water can't. It has something to do with the glycol's surface tension from what I've been reading. There have been threads documenting the leeching of glycol through propress joints as well as conventional threaded joints.

I'm not sure of glycol's ability to break down joint compound...never gave is a second thought....I'm interested to see the responses of anyone experiencing it.

By nature, glycol is not really friendly to hydronic systems. It effectively "undersizes" circulators because it's thicker than water and increases the head loss of the entire system. Rate of heat transfer is reduced as well, compromising the efficiency of the heating plant.

Try searching some of the heating forums as well as listening to the people here...you're bound to findan answer:thumbsup:
100% correct glycol has less surface tension than water allowing it to find the way out easier.
 

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I think the problem is not with the glycol but the thread sealant. Sounds like in your application there would be some pipe vibration, they make good sealants that are vibration resistant. like the locktite one Airgap posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks above--I dont know why the thanks function doesnt always work. I actually sent a letter stating that since it was after 10 months I considered it part of their maintenance and not warranty. We'll see how that flies. Its in Rockstarplumbers turf and I called him (on vacation) and he offered a sweet deal but I havent heard back from the GC.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok, it looks like the leak is on the flow control seal between the plastic housing and brass fitting part of the contol itself. Whose warranty if the manufacturer is less than 10 months. And some condensation.
On site engineer that cant put some more insulation on? The original call was a exaggerated $1800 worth of glycol lost if we are shut down its boucoup bucks etc etc. I mean, the job is only 2.25 hours away why am I not there right now?????

 

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Discussion Starter #11
We are the man. All I needed to hear was that someone thought I should honor it. We did it t&m and they recommended the flowmeter but I purchased it. My son is going out Friday. O well. Also thanks again Rockstar . I will send something in the mail.
 
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