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I m wondering if its worth buying a electric jetter.To my knowledge,you can only go up to 1500 pounds.I know a gas fired one can take you over 3000 pounds.I don t do to much jetting,so we rent a electric ridgid.after i ve used it i ll put in my camera ,first 5 ft ,is cleaned brand new,15 to 20 ft,I ve done nothing.wondering if the rental is actually giving 1500 pounds,or the machine just can t do the job.
 

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You need to make sure the heads are clean, or you will have problems. The incoming water pressure must be good also. I have done some mini jet jobs with low water pressure and got no ware fast
 

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i'm interested in this too. the reason i want to pick up an electric one is just so i can use it indoors. i guess it's not that big of a deal but it seems to me that it'd be more convenient for kitchen sinks than a gas one.







paul
 

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i'm interested in this too. the reason i want to pick up an electric one is just so i can use it indoors. i guess it's not that big of a deal but it seems to me that it'd be more convenient for kitchen sinks than a gas one.







paul
I did two jet jobs today and although it's unusual for me to do that many in a week, both of them were kitchen sink lines and both of them were accesed via their roof vents. No fuss, no muss. I have also jetted inside the house before (btw, I'm using a General J-2900 gas) I have a second hose and reel with a 1/4" hose which I bring inside. I bring the 3/8" hose from the jetter reel in and transition to the 1/4" hose. I take one of the bins from my Hackney shelving and slide it under the sink waste. Remove the trap, run the hose as far as I can push it without water down the line. Turn on the water. Fire up the jetter and run it as fast as I can way down the line or until I reach a blockage. Pull it back slowly, cleaning as I go. I'll make two or three passes and when I'm done that line will sing with free flowing water. Before I ever did this the first time I was scared to death that it was going to make an awful mess. You may get some outflow from the waste opening but if you start far enough down the line it will be minimal, just make sure you have a pan to catch it in as it comes out.
 

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Gas Verus Electric Jetters

as Above Bring In A Good Wet/dry Vacuum
to Pick Up Any Extra Water

back To Op Electric Jetters Are Only Good In 11/2" Or 2" Drains
very Lightly In 3" Drains
any Thing Over That You Need A Good Commc. Gas Jetter Up To 3 Or 4 Thousand Psi Plus The Water Flow Rate To Wash Down The Pipe You Are Trying To Clean
 

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I did two jet jobs today and although it's unusual for me to do that many in a week, both of them were kitchen sink lines and both of them were accesed via their roof vents. No fuss, no muss. I have also jetted inside the house before (btw, I'm using a General J-2900 gas) I have a second hose and reel with a 1/4" hose which I bring inside. I bring the 3/8" hose from the jetter reel in and transition to the 1/4" hose. I take one of the bins from my Hackney shelving and slide it under the sink waste. Remove the trap, run the hose as far as I can push it without water down the line. Turn on the water. Fire up the jetter and run it as fast as I can way down the line or until I reach a blockage. Pull it back slowly, cleaning as I go. I'll make two or three passes and when I'm done that line will sing with free flowing water. Before I ever did this the first time I was scared to death that it was going to make an awful mess. You may get some outflow from the waste opening but if you start far enough down the line it will be minimal, just make sure you have a pan to catch it in as it comes out.

that's exactly how i do them. all i'm thinking is that an electric one would be more compact, quiter and less hassle. if it's not going to work 80% - 90% as good as a gas one, it's not worth it to me. if an electric jetter will do as good a job as a gas one on a 1 1/2" or 2" drain, i'd be interested in one. i don't do commercial jetting when i'm working for myself so i don't need a big jetter. something small and powerfull that can fit on my small van would be great.





paul
 

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I use a gas powered 4000psi 4gpm portable jetter for most of my work. Anything bigger than 4" and you'll need a trailer jetter. Electric is just about worthless unless your doing 1 1/2 to 2" plastic with light buildup.
If your doing residential you will never need anything bigger than 4000psi at 4gpm if you know how to run one. A trailer unit is great if you have one and you know in advance that you will be jetting, but most of the time a portable will save you time vs. the trailer jet.

I wouldn't waste my money on an electric. I gave mine away.
 

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We have a couple of electric jetters sitting in the storage room at the shop. The boss keeps trying to resurrect them and get some out in the field but whoever he gets to take one gives it back pretty quick...

I guess that may say something about how well they work! :yes:
 
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