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Senior Moment
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Discussion Starter #1
If your adding a gas appliance in a residential application, (say a gas range or dryer), adding about 10-15ft of pipe, how do you isolate the rest of the existing gas piping for an air test on your new piping? No inline unions or gas cocks are allowed in Massachusetts. I believe they must be within 6ft of the appliance. Thanks for any advice!
 

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Water Whisperer
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Call your AA and ask what the requirement is.

Some things should not be asked or answered on the internet.

Thread closed...wait a minute...my button isn't working. If I close the browser, turn off the p.c., and go to work, will that close the thread?
 

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Professional Bullshioter
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Our local gas purveyor requires us to test the entire system after it is changed or added to. It usually turns into more work than the original job.

Think of it like this. You add 10' of gas piping to a stove in a home. There is a gas leak on the other end of the home you knew nothing about. 1 week later the house happens to blow up. The first thing folks will say is "Pauli was just there last week working on the gas lines":yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Our local gas purveyor requires us to test the entire system after it is changed or added to. It usually turns into more work than the original job.

Think of it like this. You add 10' of gas piping to a stove in a home. There is a gas leak on the other end of the home you knew nothing about. 1 week later the house happens to blow up. The first thing folks will say is "Pauli was just there last week working on the gas lines":yes:
Good point, better to be safe than sorry. I'll bid the job as though I will have to test the entire line. I'll have to make sure the inspector can get there the same day as the test, so I can get the heat back up and running.
 

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We run the sniffer down the lines pre-bid. Let the owner know up-front. They will have other repairs to make once we start working on the gas.

It's an easy sell. No one wants to have a gas leak.
 

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I aint CPV see in it?
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I can say that in 10 yrs, i have never come across this issue. When we add footage for an appliance, we soap all the fittings with Mega Bubble to check for leaks. We use schedule 40 metalic black iron for all of our natural gas. I dont know how someone would have a gas leak prior and not know it? The gas here is heavily diluted with a smell so awful, that you would definitely know if something was leaking eventually. I have had one call only to remeber where there was a gas leak that was detected by the HO because of the awful smell and it was on a 90 in the crawl space under the home.
But, if it is a real long run with a lot of fittings, Apollo makes a ball valve that is rated for natural gas and we will put that at the first joint that is exsiting where we will be tying on at.
 

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90% of what I speak of is on light commercial. Such as gas lines on roofs and in warehouses. Most have leaked from day one due to use of merchant couplings, poor threads, too tight(split fitting), or not tight enough.
 

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I aint CPV see in it?
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90% of what I speak of is on light commercial. Such as gas lines on roofs and in warehouses. Most have leaked from day one due to use of merchant couplings, poor threads, too tight(split fitting), or not tight enough.
Well yea, thats a little different then. A gas link on the roof would be hard to sniff out inside the building. Good point IL. :blink:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'll have ask the inspector what he wants. They all have there pet peeves. I do mostly residential service, so I don't know them all very well yet. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Any mod of the system requires an air test of the entire system. break it down at the meter and pump it up . any AL or spring loaded valves have to go. at every appliance cap or plug it off.
 

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WWwoooahhhh!!! Check it out. You plan on pumping up the system right? Isolate your appliances!!! You don't wanna buy new regulators.:eek:

Any mod of the system requires an air test of the entire system. break it down at the meter and pump it up . any AL or spring loaded valves have to go. at every appliance cap or plug it off.
 

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I've had to go back and test trailers after they were moved. That's not a job I particularly care for. Take off all the connections to appliances and cap them. Then crawl around underneath and soap everything while the pressure's on. There are usually leaks.
 

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WWwoooahhhh!!! Check it out. You plan on pumping up the system right? Isolate your appliances!!! You don't wanna buy new regulators.:eek:
True Dat! Testing against a valve doesn't meet gas code either:yes:
 

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I simply can not fathom the madness as to why you can not throw a valve ANYWHERE in a gas system. :thumbdown: I would re-read the code section (Fuel Gas Piping) in it's entirety. If this is true, then your code says you HAVE to have a system whereas you have no valves inbetween thus DIS-ALLOWING a safety shut down to a specific section should one want one or if needed, as in this case, to add to... Just throw in an AGA Approved BALL VALVE first then run your stuff. Leave the valve off and test from the end you added. When done, pull the gauge, connect the appliance and then turn on the ball valve (slowly so as not to extinguish and pilots up and burning) and Viola, no muss no fuss.

WOW, if I am wrong please learn me ok? WHO in MA says no valves midline???? An appliance has to have a valve within "X" feet of the appliance yes but no valves midstream? Are you sure here bro?
 

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I've repaired two gas leaks that were years old in houses.
They were both in finished basements above ceilings or behind wall.
The gas co were changing over service or meters and clock the meters. If don't hold they lock them out and tell the homeowner to call a plumber.
Those are the ones I remember but seen lots of gas leaks in old pipe.
Bob
 

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Perform a manometer test.

this guy has a great idea!:laughing:


if you perform a drop test with a manometer there is no reason disconnect and reconnect appliances. The right way to test a gas system is air test the system after install, and after all final connections are made perform a drop test. since you are just adding to the system the drop test is sufficient. jmo
 

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Certified Lunatic
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I can say that in 10 yrs, i have never come across this issue. When we add footage for an appliance, we soap all the fittings with Mega Bubble to check for leaks. We use schedule 40 metalic black iron for all of our natural gas. I dont know how someone would have a gas leak prior and not know it? The gas here is heavily diluted with a smell so awful, that you would definitely know if something was leaking eventually. I have had one call only to remeber where there was a gas leak that was detected by the HO because of the awful smell and it was on a 90 in the crawl space under the home.
But, if it is a real long run with a lot of fittings, Apollo makes a ball valve that is rated for natural gas and we will put that at the first joint that is exsiting where we will be tying on at.
Dude...
Get a sniffer and find the gas work you have been missing!:thumbup:

Those sniffers detect 5ppm which nobody will smell!

They are way faster than blowing bubbles and besides what do you check CSST with?:whistling2:

The cost between $100 - 200 and pay for themselves!:thumbup:

https://ssl.biggiweb.com/valuetesters/Inficon-GAS-Mate-Combustible-Gas-Leak-Detector.php

 

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Always Something
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this guy has a great idea!:laughing:


if you perform a drop test with a manometer there is no reason disconnect and reconnect appliances. The right way to test a gas system is air test the system after install, and after all final connections are made perform a drop test. since you are just adding to the system the drop test is sufficient. jmo
I see why you say that, but it's just not practicle. It's a pressure test....20 for 15 or 60 for 20. In my parts different material / applications requires different pressure test. Rarly will anything leak at a half pound or a few pounds for those states that have pressurized gas distro.

The line needs to be pressurized and the the guy wants to see the neddle stick.

A few of the guys around here will let a little air out before to make sure there is deflection. First time I saw that, I had to ask...WTF? He told me there are guys with dummy gagues....:no:
 
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