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Discussion Starter #1
The high efficiency commercial heaters intimidate me. All the modules,blowers,computer read out boards etc. I want to learn about this stuff and or send my kid who has a low voltage license. I would even fly to a school if it were good. State has a periodic class and if I have to go to these place individually so be it. Our experience is mostly electric so before I am tempted beyond my knowledge etc..
 

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Illinois Licensed Plumber
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I would call a manufacture, or a distributer that sells units, they usually sponsor some sort of training. I think State has classes to learn the ins and outs of their commercial units.
 

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I would call a manufacture, or a distributer that sells units, they usually sponsor some sort of training. I think State has classes to learn the ins and outs of their commercial units.
A good start...
The thing to realize is these aren't as complicated as it seems.
Yea they look overwhelming but don't let them scare you.

Basically all these are is a bunch of sensors feeding into a litle computer board that makes decisions based on the inputs recieved from the sensors, the board then tells various control parts what to do based on its decisions...

See...
What's so complicated about that... :laughing:

All you have to do is find the component that isn't working properly that has a sensor saying there is a fault don't run...
Or,
The sensor that is lying saying that a component isn't working right...
Or,
The component that was supposed to make an adjustment based on the boards decision that isn't working right...
Or,
The board that lost it's mind and is screwing it all up...
Or,
Maybe nothing to do with anything your looking at but taking that squirrels nest out of the flue pipe would fix everything.

The fault codes just give you the area of the malfunction you have to look at the related causes...

It really isn't as bad as your thinking when you look at the big picture...
But, It's not just a tea pot anymore...
 

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Always Something
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LOL...This is funny. True, a manufactures class would be of benefit, but real world experience is the only way to become confident on advanced systems. The more you do, the more educated you are in how system designs work. What systems are likley to fail due to enviornment or just a bad design all comes with experience.

I get calls from other plumbers semi locally to me and they are asking me how to test the transformer or how to test a relay and things like that....how can I explain things like that over the phone to a guy that has no idea what he is doing? it gets frustrating sometimes.

My advice is to learn your equipment. study all the systems. Study the flow charts...that's why they are there. It's alot like algabra. If this equals this and that equals that, than this should be X..or X ='s ___
Trouble shooting is alot like math, there is always a logical answer. Of course poor designs can impeed upon that theory, hence my issues with many manufacturers out there.

Think about it - talk about it- DO IT. This is how you master things....at least IMHO!
 

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Also, see if you can get some troubleshooting guides for the different heaters. If you know how to use a meter and understand sequence of events then you are should be able to figure out whats going wrong. If you can't get a class on working on those powervent heaters try a basic class or two on furnce repair. You will learn alot that will apply to the way the power vented water heater works. and commercial water heaters.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Also, see if you can get some troubleshooting guides for the different heaters. If you know how to use a meter and understand sequence of events then you are should be able to figure out whats going wrong. If you can't get a class on working on those powervent heaters try a basic class or two on furnce repair. You will learn alot that will apply to the way the power vented water heater works. and commercial water heaters.
Not as on a platter as I hoped but definitely a good lead.
 

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Not as on a platter as I hoped but definitely a good lead.

Or call Redwood next time you are working on one, he can talk you through it over the phone....:laughing: Or just do what a lesser man would do who doesn't know how to repair something..... he replaces it!:thumbsup: LOL
 

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I started with the heat maker then laars all hands on all of these systems pretty much work the same. I say you print out the pdf on the most popular brands in your area all the info is there and most have good tech support. soon you will learn all there faults and diagnosis will take less and less time. good luck and have fun learning something new.
 

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The Token Engineer
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LOL...This is funny. True, a manufactures class would be of benefit, but real world experience is the only way to become confident on advanced systems. The more you do, the more educated you are in how system designs work. What systems are likley to fail due to enviornment or just a bad design all comes with experience.

I get calls from other plumbers semi locally to me and they are asking me how to test the transformer or how to test a relay and things like that....how can I explain things like that over the phone to a guy that has no idea what he is doing? it gets frustrating sometimes.

My advice is to learn your equipment. study all the systems. Study the flow charts...that's why they are there. It's alot like algabra. If this equals this and that equals that, than this should be X..or X ='s ___
Trouble shooting is alot like math, there is always a logical answer. Of course poor designs can impeed upon that theory, hence my issues with many manufacturers out there.

Think about it - talk about it- DO IT. This is how you master things....at least IMHO!
So true, how do explain how to check for an open circuit when they dont know where to plug in the leads of the meter they dont have.
 

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Certified Lunatic
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So true, how do explain how to check for an open circuit when they dont know where to plug in the leads of the meter they dont have.
Better send him a different job...:whistling2:

Sounds like he's not qualified....:no:
 

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LOL...This is funny. True, a manufactures class would be of benefit, but real world experience is the only way to become confident on advanced systems. The more you do, the more educated you are in how system designs work. What systems are likley to fail due to enviornment or just a bad design all comes with experience.

I get calls from other plumbers semi locally to me and they are asking me how to test the transformer or how to test a relay and things like that....how can I explain things like that over the phone to a guy that has no idea what he is doing? it gets frustrating sometimes.

My advice is to learn your equipment. study all the systems. Study the flow charts...that's why they are there. It's alot like algabra. If this equals this and that equals that, than this should be X..or X ='s ___
Trouble shooting is alot like math, there is always a logical answer. Of course poor designs can impeed upon that theory, hence my issues with many manufacturers out there.

Think about it - talk about it- DO IT. This is how you master things....at least IMHO!
Great point! Until I moved to Florida I worked on very few electric water heaters and knew little about diagnosing them. That's about all Florida has is electric and now I have no problem and know most of the amps readings related to elements watts by heart.
 
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