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Building codes guy
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is something I encounter quite often...

T&C pipe that comes with a running thread (not tapered thread as required by code) "coupling" on it. These couplings have the threads ran straight through them, and therefore don't have tapered ends to receive the tapered threads on the pipes.

They'll hold pressure, and lots of homes are full of them, but they aren't legal!
 

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...and probably something every apprentice has done at one time or another is to use that fitting,I'm sure I did,unfortunately,can't remember that far back.:laughing:
 

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Merchant Coupling, we call then thread protectors and chunk them in the yard as soon as we off load the pipe. They sell them all day long down here.... for a reason I wish I knew.
 

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Merchant Coupling, we call then thread protectors and chunk them in the yard as soon as we off load the pipe. They sell them all day long down here.... for a reason I wish I knew.
They are used a lot in chemical plants and refineries where they assemble and dis-assemble stuff on a routine basis.
 

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Master Plumber
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This is something I encounter quite often...

T&C pipe that comes with a running thread (not tapered thread as required by code) "coupling" on it. These couplings have the threads ran straight through them, and therefore don't have tapered ends to receive the tapered threads on the pipes.

They'll hold pressure, and lots of homes are full of them, but they aren't legal!
I never knew they did not have a tapered thread. Just never looked or paid attention.

But then, I was always taught you never, ever use them. Like was said, I consider them thread protectors.

Oh, BTW, when loading on your truck, put the coupling to the back. My dad lost a windshield on his van one day when one dropped off the pipe. Yes, I had loaded them. Yes, I had been taught differently. Yes, I caught hell.

Now I hand tighten them and load them to the rear of the vehicle.
 

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Building codes guy
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Yes, I've heard them called thread protectors by some. I've dealt with many frustrated plumbers that make the argument "I bought thread and couple pipe, and that's the coupler that came with it!!!" I once contacted a couple manufacturers that sell it just to get their input, and they argued that it was in fact a coupler. When I e-mailed them a scan of the code section they both agreed that it did not meet the code. All they are is the next size larger pipe reamed all the way through with threads.

Normally it is just a fitting or two here and there. The worst I've had was a 19000 square foot house that had everything from 3" line on down to 1/2" line, and so many "thread protectors" they basically had to tear everything out and start over. I've been on a number of strip mall rooftops that had the same problem.

To be honest, I've got a 1959 house that has a number of them on the original parts of the gasline. No leaks. Trust me, I checked when I bought it!

Sounds like you guys are on top of this one! Glad to hear it! You'd all be shocked at the amount of surprised looks I get on this one.
 

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I call them thread protectors, not code approved.
 

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This is something I encounter quite often...

T&C pipe that comes with a running thread (not tapered thread as required by code) "coupling" on it. These couplings have the threads ran straight through them, and therefore don't have tapered ends to receive the tapered threads on the pipes.

They'll hold pressure, and lots of homes are full of them, but they aren't legal!
Although I don't see any markings on that coupling, based on the short nipple, could that be a left-and-right coupling set?
 

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J. McCabe Plumbing Inc.
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Although I don't see any markings on that coupling, based on the short nipple, could that be a left-and-right coupling set?
:eek: say what??

If the coupling has an ASP marking stamped on it, it is an approved coupling and it can be used on gas pipe. ASP stamped couplings have tapered threads although they look like any ordinary thread protector.
 

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Building codes guy
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If the coupling has an ASP marking stamped on it, it is an approved coupling and it can be used on gas pipe. ASP stamped couplings have tapered threads although they look like any ordinary thread protector.
I've encountered one of those in over seven years, but they are out there. These thread protectors have no markings on them at all.

Grandpa, they're running threads, and are therefore illegal for use on a gas system.
 

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I didn't notice whether anyone said this coupling in the picture was actually checked and was a running thread. Left/rights look like that, except they usually have a knurled band, or some other marking.
 

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If it has running threads then its just butting up the pipe..... A welder I know had to back weld over 40 merchant coupling because they used them instead of actual couplings... They put product on the line before they tested it also..... Which is a no no but they were appren. with no journeyman on the job. It was in a full service gas station. Oil,water and air.... all blowing out at the same time... It was nasty!
 

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Bead couplings, shipping couplings.
Absolutely NO use for them, they go in the trash once off the pipe.
 
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