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Discussion Starter #1
I heard you could not use a fernco horizontal. If this is true, then what do you do when installing another line to an existing say under a concrete slab. You have to cut the pipe to accept the new fitting, then you must cut the piece for the other end 1-1/2" shorter so you can get it into the hub. Thus when you push it on you wind up with a 1-1/2" gap. A no hub band would hold the pipes together better and prevent sag, but they are only 2" wide which means you only have 1/4" on each end of the pipe. Even if you use a slip coupling you only wind up with 3/4" over each end. What do you do?
 

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Under our code, we can use fernco's where ever we feel, horizontal, vertical, diagonal, inverted, right side up, what ever you want to call it, we can use them there.
 

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HI JC how about an intro from you?
 

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LeMarr Plumbing, Inc.
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You can't use them above ground in Chicago, period.
Even within the state of IL. But there would be times that it would be a whole lot easier if you can use above ground, let say on a remodel/repipe with CI.
I have troubles making the NO-Hubs (bands) look worth a hoot at times.

In Christ,

Song Dog
 

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Crooked NO HUB/Mission Band

Yes, it does suck when your No Hub or Mission Band (brand?) go crooked on the cast iron side.

I blame crazy castings and service weight, regular, etc.

A PVC transition fitting helps though. :)

J.C.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So, for those of you who can not use them, how do you join a tee wey into an existing line to connect the 2?
 

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The question is how do you tie in a new line into an existing line if you have no movements in the existing line, say like a line in the ground?
 

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Gotcha'. Depends what's going on but I have dug the line out say... 10' both ways. Measure, raise them both above the trench, then push them down together.

J.C.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Exactly Ron. Say you want to add a line to an existing line thats under a concrete slab. You can not do anything but dig up where the new pipe will join into the existing one. So you dig it up, cut the existing line, install the fitting. Now you have a space on the other side. You measure the lenght, BUT you need to cut it 1-1/2" shorter so you can slide it into the hub. That leaves a 1-1/2" gap between the pipes. So a No-Hub band is 2" wide, so that leaves 1/4" on each pipe. A slip coupling is 3" long, so 3" - 1-1/2 leaves 1-1/2 " of coupling left to hold 2 ends of the pipe. That divided by 2 means you only have 3/4" of coupling holding each end.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Gotcha'. Depends what's going on but I have dug the line out say... 10' both ways. Measure, raise them both above the trench, then push them down together.

J.C.
But what if it is under a concrete slab, you can not lift the pipe high enough to make it work.
 

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Depends. Each situation is different. I usually can think my way around it. If it's inside under a slab-more thinking. :whistling2:

If it's the outside edge or under a few feet, transition and go. :)

J.C.
 
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