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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fellas, good day and god bless to all!! I wanted to write with a unique request. I was approached by the director of a GI clinic which uses eyewash stations in various points of the clinic. Her Lead RN says the water is too cold and hurts their eyes when they must use it. She asks me, can you plumb warm water to them?
Well my first thought was, if I plumb hot water to them it would likely restrict flow. Can't do that!, so, I start thinking, (smell the wood burning?), I tap off of a HWR line with a mixing valve, I might do alright.

My question is, if I match up a 1/2" supply (HW), from the mixing valve, I'd be matching flow from the cold as equivalent, will this fly?
I was always on the understanding that tempered water is a breeding ground for bad $#it in the water, defeating the purpose of an eyewash. I am not willing to put my name on the hook, I just can't find any defining instruction.
Any ideas?

Thanks,

Pat
M5 Plumbing Services
 

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It has been a while since I installed them. I believe we used a tempering valve because the inspector had to check the temp. Maybe your code is different than VA.

Maybe someone else here may be more familliar with them than I.
 

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Just curious about what is going on in that clinic! Most eyewash stations go unused...forever. If a true emergency comes up requiring use of the eyewash station....seems like the temperature is of little concern.

But as to the specific question...I do not know if you are required or allowed to temper the water. I would call the OSHA inspector or find the spec sheet that applies to the clinic. Also, a call to the manufacturer of the station might be helpful.
 

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If a true emergency comes up requiring use of the eyewash station....seems like the temperature is of little concern.

Agreed, and just another silly restriction on this world........just make the fookin water cold, my god, if you get gasoline in your eye who cares what the temp is :) at least for most......

I wonder what they did before eye wash stations.......Think very faucet had to be a certain temp>?

These inspectors have way to much length in term, they should make a rule that inspectors have to retire after 2 / 4 years like the president, this would allow more "fresh" ideas and people in the mix

</rant>
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"Eyewash stations in a clinic"

Fellas, thank you for the help. USP45, I am thinking the same as Muck, take it off the ruff, put a mixing valve and call it good like you both. However, Grandpa got my goat when he said OSHA and the Mfr data. The only OSHA requirement I'm familiar with is the no flow restriction...Well, better get my shovel and digsummor :blink:

As to the clinic, here's a little back ground, no pun intended...It is a Gastroenterology clinic, or Borescope shop. Sorry guys had to throw that one out there...Anyhoot, they use this chemical for cleaning the things and it is pretty gnarly stuff. The Rn's and whatnot want the tempered water so it doesn't hurt their eyes. *******, I hear you too bro.

Pat
 

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Is it just me or does the thought of burning acid on my eyeball make water temp seem so unimportant. If there is acid spattered across my face I highly doubt i am going to stand there long enough waiting for a "comfortable temp."
 

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Yea at first it was unimportant.
It sure felt good.:thumbup:

But, seeing as first aid for chemical burns to the eye calls for an extended flushing time, the winter water temps in the mid 30's come to bear. 36 degree water spraying in both eyes and across the bridge of the nose for 20 minutes can be a tad bit uncomfortable. If not required by code it is an upgrade that you should attempt to sell. Use this as an example for the customer to ponder.
 

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We pipe tepid water per OSHA standard to all eye washes and eye wash body drench units. We shoot for 82 degrees. There is money to be made in this particular area. Our water comes out of the ground about 59 degrees. Way too cold for eye washing or body drenching. It takes a huge water heater to support these units due to high flows and extended run times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ILP, what is the OSHA standard you used for reference, I'd like to throw the book at the clinic and see what they think as to a plan I can give to make it happen. :thumbsup:
 

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Wisconsin code requires us to use tempered water. We typically tie a recirc line as close as possible to the unit to maintain instant tempered water.
 

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Wisconsin code requires us to use tempered water. We typically tie a recirc line as close as possible to the unit to maintain instant tempered water.
So they discharge 115 degree water from an eyewash in WI?:eek:
 

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I assumed incorrectly. When I think of tempered water I think of domestic tempered hot. 115 degrees.

Tepid water on the other hand I think of around 85 degrees. My apologies.
 
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