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https://www.garrettwade.com/copper-...MI-un5lsTz3wIVT7XtCh0JMgNlEAkYCCABEgIxo_D_BwE


I got one of those used on ebay cheap with the 1/2" and 3/4" heads. It heats up pipe very quick. It's basically like someone took two 60w soldering irons and joined them like scissors. The heads slip on and stay with a set screw.




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I was looking at those very closely but they had negative reviews so I didn't get a pair. If you say they do the job well for 1/2 and 3/4 I'm going to get one.
 

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I was looking at those very closely but they had negative reviews so I didn't get a pair. If you say they do the job well for 1/2 and 3/4 I'm going to get one.
I too saw the negative reviews and was apprehensive but I had originally found out about thse on a uk plumbing forum where lots of real uk plumbers swear by them. I figure most of the bad reviews were diy trying not to burn down their house because they couldn't handle a torch and the odd plumber who has never used a soldering iron before.

I saw a great deal on ebay with both sets of jaws so I got them. I had trouble at first but it was just because I left them on too long and burnt the flux. They heat up really quickly. Also, you grip the pipe not the fitting. It is weird and takes some practice but in those cases where you risk lighting the 100yr old wallpaper I would say these are it.

To be honest with you though space is tight on my van so I leave them at home. They ended up at the bottom of my toolbox and I didnt want them getting destroyed. They are well built for what they are but obviously cant handle steel tools riding on top of them.

They have a switch in them so they only turn on when you squeeze them together. Like I said they heat up quick so I debated wiring up a rheostat and an outlet in a box to adjust the temp. But I don't use them so I didn't. I don't remember what I paid but for the good deal I got it fed my tool addiction without too much sting. They probably won't be useful to you so I really can't reccomend them.


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Just like my watergate/jetswet, I thought I'd use it a lot but only used it once. Most times it just won't fit with spaghetti piping. I'll have to give into SB at some point.
 

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Just like my watergate/jetswet, I thought I'd use it a lot but only used it once. Most times it just won't fit with spaghetti piping. I'll have to give into SB at some point.

SB is horse chit. When I have a drip that just won't stop I use penicillin. When a valve won't shut off all the way I have a couple tricks.


First, I heat like 4" before my actual joint with the torch pointed to the joint. This causes the water to steam and the joint to be hot enough that you'll get a vapor barrier and usually works.


For worse drips I might use two torches, one normal and one 6" back. It isn't always easy and having a helper helps a lot.


A third trick which usually works involves using a fitting that is small enough to heat up even with the water and then allows you to mechanically connect. Ideally you use a coupling half. Next would be a male adapter.



My last trick is a female tee if it's a horizontal line. Put it on with the hole facing down. Heat up the pipe a couple inches back with the torch pointed at the joint. I have done that a couple times with good success. The hole lets you solder on the other side like normal after that first bad joint and then obviously you just plug the hole when you're done. Use a boiler drain if you want it to look on purpose ;)


One of our guys had to go fix a 3" copper main with some slip couplings a couple weeks ago. He was saying how the old gate valve didn't hold all the way and it was a pita. I asked him if he did the bread trick! lolz Yeah I said, just call back for two loaves of bread!


I shiz you not, one of my bosses was talking to one of our guys about a job he would have to go do and how the valve didn't hold. He legit told him to use the bread trick. That boss has probably soldered fewer joints than my 8yr old. I am sure it some times works but it just seems way too hokey, I could never do that.






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One of our guys had to go fix a 3" copper main with some slip couplings a couple weeks ago. He was saying how the old gate valve didn't hold all the way and it was a pita. I asked him if he did the bread trick! lolz Yeah I said, just call back for two loaves of bread!


I shiz you not, one of my bosses was talking to one of our guys about a job he would have to go do and how the valve didn't hold. He legit told him to use the bread trick. That boss has probably soldered fewer joints than my 8yr old. I am sure it some times works but it just seems way too hokey, I could never do that.



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I used bread many many times, I've said it here before, in a supermarket extension I used a whole white baguette every night in my scissor lift working on a copper 2" line. It was the only way. Company didn't supply any tools. The security guard would look at me crazy when I asked if I could take the discounted bread.
 

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I used bread many many times, I've said it here before, in a supermarket extension I used a whole white baguette every night in my scissor lift working on a copper 2" line. It was the only way. Company didn't supply any tools. The security guard would look at me crazy when I asked if I could take the discounted bread.



A "baguette". Soooo stereotypical ;)




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haha I get it. When I was a teen our soccer team went to France for soccer training. We visited a town once and it was really hot and humid there and a woman who walked by with a baguette under her arm. Ok that was out of the ordinary for me. Then this man strolled by with another baguette under his arm pit although this time he was sweaty and the baguette was wet and soggy in the middle and had limped like a banana! It burned an image in my brain forever, like what is he going to eat that for real??

I now have PTSD. :vs_OMG:
 

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haha I get it. When I was a teen our soccer team went to France for soccer training. We visited a town once and it was really hot and humid there and a woman who walked by with a baguette under her arm. Ok that was out of the ordinary for me. Then this man strolled by with another baguette under his arm pit although this time he was sweaty and the baguette was wet and soggy in the middle and had limped like a banana! It burned an image in my brain forever, like what is he going to eat that for real??

I now have PTSD. :vs_OMG:
PTSD.. POST TRAUMATIC SWEAT DISORDER...:vs_laugh::vs_laugh::vs_laugh::vs_laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Electric Soldering Machines for Sale

Retired, and selling off tools .


One is the Rigid RT 100. The other is the RT 175.

The # 100 solders up to 1 1/2" copper. $280.00
The # 175 solders up to 3" copper $ 400.00

We used them for re-pipes in an apartment complex to avoid using a flame in the partially opened walls.

Shipping extra.

Also have ratchet (Rigid) and scissor (Reed) type soil pipe cutters for sale


PM if interested or looking for other items, also see two postings below.


View attachment 110044

View attachment 110046





Not that I want to hijack my hijacked thread, but I have quoted the original thread which is about selling the Rigid soldering tools. I corrected the pricing which I had misquoted from my spreadsheet.


As far as Canada is concerned, I would not ship to Canada simply because of the complications already stated. We forget that Canada is a foreign country with its own laws. I live in Michigan about 25 miles from the border and a lot has changed since 9/11 as far as entering Canada and returning to the US. Say the wrong thing or try to be humorous and you could be in for a bad time. Although in some cases you could receive a free rectal exam.:surprise:
Now, to hijack my own thread, I also have for sale Jet Swets up to 3" (including 2 1/2")Forget the bread, when you need a JetSwet, you need a JetSwet.
 

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Not that I want to hijack my hijacked thread, but I have quoted the original thread which is about selling the Rigid soldering tools. I corrected the pricing which I had misquoted from my spreadsheet.


As far as Canada is concerned, I would not ship to Canada simply because of the complications already stated. We forget that Canada is a foreign country with its own laws. I live in Michigan about 25 miles from the border and a lot has changed since 9/11 as far as entering Canada and returning to the US. Say the wrong thing or try to be humorous and you could be in for a bad time. Although in some cases you could receive a free rectal exam.:surprise:
Now, to hijack my own thread, I also have for sale Jet Swets up to 3" (including 2 1/2")Forget the bread, when you need a JetSwet, you need a JetSwet.
I want to make it clear for Americans who don't want to ship to Canada and explain the process. Stop fearing some boogeyman that doesn't exist. It is not evil and don't get wound up from what I wrote, you won't go to jail unless you send drugs or undeclared guns. I import and export a lot of things. Hundreds and probably over a thousand parcels through the years. I import from the US, drain machines, tools, shoes, CD's books, car parts etc. I imported my toilet I crap in every day from California! I import candy from Germany and also the ropump, I import toiled parts and tools from Great Britain, I import music cassettes from Russia, I imported my chinese camera from China and got it within 4 days.


I sold many stereos that went across the border to Florida, Arizona, and many other places. I sold my onboard truck welder to a guy in Hawaii, I sold used offroad truck parts including a heavy drive shaft to more people in the US. I exported, CD's, records, music memorabilia to the US, Germany, Australia and the list goes on.


It's the same thing as sending a letter across the street. The only difference when I ship something south of the border is an extra sticker on the parcel asking what's inside and value. Seems very simple to me, you sell a T-shirt, you write T-shirt on the sticker and pay the shipping fee. See that was easy!


For the Americans it's the same thing. You pay the shipping, write on the label what's inside and declare the value and you're done. If you want to sell something 5$ it isn't illegal, you are allowed to sell the item at the price you want. I also did many trades, I traded many things with a fellow German collector and several others in the states. No duties or taxes involved. Package, sticker with value and pay shipping done!


The package is delivered into my mailbox if it's under a certain amount. If not I get the package at the postal office or carrier center and pay the duty fees to Canada Post, UPS, Fedex, DHL. Done deal. See how easy it is!
 

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I have shipped stuff to canada when I was selling on ebay..only pain was I had to go to the post office to give in the package as many packages of certain size I can pop into the mail box..other than that no other issues..
 

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As far as Canada is concerned, I would not ship to Canada simply because of the complications already stated. We forget that Canada is a foreign country with its own laws. I live in Michigan about 25 miles from the border and a lot has changed since 9/11 as far as entering Canada and returning to the US. Say the wrong thing or try to be humorous and you could be in for a bad time. Although in some cases you could receive a free rectal exam.:surprise:
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I don't want to sound like I'm bashing you and you are entitled to your opinion but I have to state the boogeyman syndrome again. I want to dissipate the fear and tension that some may experience.

There's only an imaginary line between the countries and for the most part only a river or a cut line in forests. We both have Mcdonalds, Subway restaurants, Walmart, Burger King and guess what we buy all our stuff from China We all buy oil from the East. Last but not least we are humans.

Last time I went to the States after 9/11 only a couple years ago I forgot to renew my passport and it was expired by one day! The US officer told me it was expired and let me in anyway and wished us a good day. It's just like the bad reviews on an item sold online. The review leaves a bad image for many and sticks in your head while hundreds of others enjoy the product and don't bother posting a good review.


I did an offroad trip a long time ago and we were stopped by the border patrol about an hour in. The K-9 put his paws on the door and sniffed, after their questioning the officers were commenting on the truck checking out the lift and tires because it looked cool and to see a modified Toyota intending to go play on the rocks.

As being serious crossing the border its common sense. Do what you are told, reply what they need to know, be respectful, don't joke or fool around and forget the negative attitude. Yes sir, no sir and they'll let you in.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
There's only an imaginary line between the countries and for the most part only a river or a cut line in forests.



Its true, it is an imaginary line, but around here (in Michigan) the three border crossings, Detroit/Windsor, Port Huron/Sarnia, and Soo Saint Marie Michigan/Ontario are all bridges or tunnel and the "imaginary" line is very real and very protected. Just last Thursday, the news was reporting a one hour delay at the Blue Water bridge in Port Huron and at least 30 minutes at the Detroit Bridge. Those delays are not unusual and they are usually due to thorough inspection or questioning by either customs or immigration officers.


"We both have Mcdonalds, Subway restaurants, Walmart, Burger King and guess what we buy all our stuff from China We all buy oil from the East. Last but not least we are humans."


That is absolutely true, but we are still in two different countries even though we share many traits, and (almost!) share a common language.


Years ago, we used to cross the border with little more than answering "where were you born" or "how long were you in Canada?" Today you need special I.D. if you cross daily for work, or an enhanced drivers license, or a passport, and you are still subject to random searches at the border. I don't know where your crossing points are, but there is nothing casual about it in this area.



"As being serious crossing the border its common sense. Do what you are told, reply what they need to know, be respectful, don't joke or fool around and forget the negative attitude. Yes sir, no sir and they'll let you in"


That is always the best advice.

If you want to discuss this further that would be cool with me, if you were to PM me or open a thread for that, but the original thread was to try to sell a piece of equipment and I would like to get back to that. Merci.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Did you sell the 100?

No, both soldering machines are still available.



Due to various issues, I am just getting back to this thread and to selling off tools and material due to the fact that I am still trying to retire.


I have a 48" Rigid pipe wrench for sale as well as 2- 36 Rigid wrenches . Also soil pipe cutters, 4-wheel pipe cutters (up to 4" pipe), large size Jet-Swets and various other tools. I also have quite a few old catalogues and reference literature for plumbing, steam and hydronic heating.



As for the Canadian/U.S. issue, if someone from Canada wants to buy something, and since I am in Southeast Michigan, I would do a face to face transaction somewhere on the US side of the border. Most of my stuff is in a storage unit less than 30 minutes from the bridge or tunnel.
 
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