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I do not own my own business, YET anyways, but for you guys out there that do have employees, how do you handle your employees with respect to motivation?

A little background info: I'm relatively happy with my current wage. But while I obviously chose plumbing/heating to make money, there was a certain "people" thing about it - I want to help people, I want to learn how to do things right and as best as possible, and subsequently they,my customers, get to sleep at night not having to worry about their plumbing or heating system failing or causing problems. And the customer thing works in a lot of ways.

My boss also gets to sleep at night knowing that this Scott guy takes pride in his work and won't cause any potential floods, or issues.

Yet while some of us work for our boss, where our boss exploits our abilities to make a profit, I would give up a $1 per hour if it meant actually getting some honest feedback from my boss i.e. them showing up on site and tellng me how I'm doing, giving me some advice, or training, and offering a human side as an aside to the "you work for me, I pay you". I am not stupid - I know that we sell plumbing and heating services to make a profit, and I have great respect for anyone who chooses to go into this business and they deserve the $$$ they make to set everything up.

But lately due to the size of the company I work for I sometimes wonder if I even have a boss at times.

So I'm curious how you treat your guys, and how you feel it influences your big picture and goals?
 

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Lunches. Appreciation goes along way to motivate. Right now its my 2 sons and I feel like I have to be more careful to not press their buttons.
The systems and procedures of some of the companies(referring specifically to the Clockwork Home Services) has a built in higher wage being key to attracting top talent. But "building a team" and showing appreciation should be present in successful employee management. Training too. Also if an employer is not actively aware and interested in his workers he cant excel. A properly set up business has systems and procedures where the customer is 1st the worker 2nd and the ownershio 3rd but the ownership should require high levels of effort. A family business is of course different.
 

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waterheaterzone.com
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Respect is a two-way street, it must be given and earned. I give my employee as much respect as possible. Respect his workmanship, his ambition and his willingness to help me out. I pay him adequately, but money isn't everything. A pat on the back and some admiration for his skills goes a long way. Also a "thank you" when he works long hours or is on call should never be omitted.
I hope your boss realizes this, and doesn't take you for granted. A plumbing company is only as strong as the men (and women) that work there. Don't ever forget it employers!:red_indian:
 

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Plumbing Contractor
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We

I know where you are coming from. I worked for this one company for 4 year. They grew so fast when I started I was Mike after 3 years I was #285 and never seen the boss again.

Me and my wife wanted more of the old ways of a company use to be. With family values in mind. We also agreed not to become a big company we went 2 Licensed Plumbers and 1 apprentice. 1 guy to run service, 1 to do new installations and training the apprentice. Of course I will be in the field where needed and also hunt down more work. Office seen is not for me. that's why my wife runs that part.

My guys get from us:

1. 5 new company shirts to wear

2. I treat them and there whole family to my house for cook outs and some times take them out to eat.

3. Take them to lunch sometimes

4. If we do good on a big job I'll throw them some $ as a bonus.

5. If they have family events to go to and need off early. we make sure they get that tiem off.

6. Never tell them 2 work late or a Saturday, But ask them do you have plans Tonight feel like working late? Think you could work this SAturday? If they tell me No! I just handle the task myself.
 

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J. McCabe Plumbing Inc.
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409 Posts
I do not own my own business, YET anyways, but for you guys out there that do have employees, how do you handle your employees with respect to motivation?


Yet while some of us work for our boss, where our boss exploits our abilities to make a profit, I would give up a $1 per hour if it meant actually getting some honest feedback from my boss i.e. them showing up on site and tellng me how I'm doing, giving me some advice, or training, and offering a human side as an aside to the "you work for me, I pay you". I am not stupid - I know that we sell plumbing and heating services to make a profit, and I have great respect for anyone who chooses to go into this business and they deserve the $$$ they make to set everything up.

But lately due to the size of the company I work for I sometimes wonder if I even have a boss at times.

So I'm curious how you treat your guys, and how you feel it influences your big picture and goals?


Sounds like you've been reading "The Carrot Principle" by Adrian Costik.


This is exactly what is discussed in the book. Most people would rather be paid less and be patted on the back. The book shows studies of people who were paid a lot of money and not patted on the back or recognized for their accomplishments, were not necessarily happy employees.

Sounds like you, like most, fall into this category.

A good lesson for all employers to keep in mind. Money alone does not make a happy employee.
 
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