Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like to use the white or blue for cold and red for hot, just makes it easier. I have worked for some GC,s who outright refuse to have it done this way claiming it looks too much like a mobile home job.
Whats your opinion?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,808 Posts
It's a guarantee that you won't have a hot toilet when it's all said and done, seen it happens a few times in the past from using all clear or white pex.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SHEPLMBR70

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,951 Posts
True enough it takes the guess work out. All though a hot toilet would be nice on those cold days.....:eek::thumbup:
 

·
Plumbing Contractor
Joined
·
972 Posts
Colors

I use Blue fro cold soft,White for hard cold and of course red for hot. I have one builder that preffers white only.
 

·
Plumbing Contractor
Joined
·
972 Posts
Oh I for got !!!

One place I use to work at before. I have see when some one even with it being red pipe run it to the toilet and NO they are not color blind either just plain DUMB!:blink: I hated to follow that crew when it came time to do a finish! :censored:
 
  • Like
Reactions: yaacovp

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
One place I use to work at before. I have see when some one even with it being red pipe run it to the toilet and NO they are not color blind either just plain DUMB!:blink: I hated to follow that crew when it came time to do a finish! :censored:
I know what you mean, takes a lot of brains to look for the sink and figure which is hot and which is cold!
 

·
Building codes guy
Joined
·
40 Posts
I always use white or blue for cold and red for hot when I run PEX. From an inspection standpoint, it is a little clue that the plumber cares about his work. Not to say that someone that uses all white doesn't care, but I think color coding makes it a more professional-looking installation.

I know a plumber that requires his guys to line up the letters on PVC DWV installations. Does it matter? Nope, but it makes them pay attention to detail, and I've found that his quality is often better than his competitors just because his guys are paying attention and planning ahead.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
I know a plumber that requires his guys to line up the letters on PVC DWV installations. Does it matter? Nope, but it makes them pay attention to detail, and I've found that his quality is often better than his competitors just because his guys are paying attention and planning ahead.
I do that, I also make sure the lettering on copper waste and vent is always lined up so that it can be seen, it looks neater, and the inspectors know right away what type copper was used on the job. There are a couple of inspectors here that show up for an inspection, see that I did job, take a quick look around, sign it approved and leave.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
6,781 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do that, I also make sure the lettering on copper waste and vent is always lined up so that it can be seen, it looks neater, and the inspectors know right away what type copper was used on the job. There are a couple of inspectors here that show up for an inspection, see that I did job, take a quick look around, sign it approved and leave.
Same here even with DWV. I always insist on having the words visible. Also I can not stand all that primer crap on my pipes! Looks sloppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
843 Posts
I do it both ways, though I like color-coded. I've yet to see PEX in a trailer. Mostly, it's CPVC in the newer ones and all one color. I recently ran into a leaking relief valve with a CPVC tube that had plugged solid.

I run into lots of PB installations, too, and sometimes it's got the carbon black. Usually, I'm replacing a broken tee or the stops under the fixtures no longer work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
It took my son. 2 years to talk me into using Pex. I was a copper man, through and through ! Then after using it while helping a friend with a job he was roughing, and he used it. I was amazed, but still it took a couple situations where my son would say, "Dad wouldn't it be so much easier, with Pex right now ?" Well, I plunged, bought the Rigid Propress 200B, with the Propress Jaws and ViegaPex Jaws(still like to see at least brass on a plastic water pipe fitting). Except now I have a couple thousand copper fittings, that are sitting on my shelves. Use a "street" fitting now and again with the Propress. My shop was started in 1933. You can imagine what I have. I have fittings that you wouldn't find in any supply house. Some definitely interesting copper fittings, 4" and down. Then there are the Plumbing Museum fittings. Anyone know what a "Kennedy Tee" fitting is ? Have 2 of them. Never ever used one, (not quite that old) . I seriously have a lot of respect for the guys that used to have to cut and thread, water and galvanized drains and vents. Besides running 4" cast iron stacks, and pouring lead, for every joint !! It has been a while since I poured "my" last one. Another one, for the younger guys, a Kafer fitting ?? (You want to make sure, you only use "one" "F" when spelling it !!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,466 Posts
for pex..red for hot, blue for cold and the o2 barrier comes in red or white for heat..looks nice before the sheetrock goes up and no mistakes of cross connecting hot and cold....when using copper, I try and get the blue printing showing ,so the inspector knows L copper was used..here all heat lines get insulated along with the hot water lines. ill also insulate the cold to help with condensation in the warmer months,,now all the piping is grey covered insulation...

Honest: once you go pex you wont go back...many times ill do a hybird system..run pex for the long runs to the water mains then if a straight plumbing wall, run copper in the bathroom , rather than pex and all the crimps and fittings and then transition back to copper for the stub outs for the speedy valves, I still dont like pex stub outs..you cant chrome them lol...( sanding down the copper stub and tinning them with solder to make chrome stub outs for toilets and pedestals)..
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top