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residential service
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We've wandered into somewhat unfamiliar territory in that we are writing a contract for some rather extensive commercial (church) sub slab drainage piping repair.

We have included in the past, for much smaller projects, language in our contracts releasing us from liability from anything that might get torn up during cutting, breaking, and excavation.

What I'm wondering is two things: How should we word this language so as to be very clear about what we can't know and can't be responsible for without creating undue alarm or concern that their building is going to be destroyed or someone hurt or killed. The second thing I'm wondering is how does it need to be worded so that it actually affords me legal protection or can it even do that at all? (oh, hey, this is LegalZone lawyer's forum right? I'm a diy iron clad contract writer and I just have this little question.)

I don't expect any problems and am already planning on having a certified electrician standing by during all saw cutting operations who can shut everything down quickly if necessary. We will also have someone on station to kill the gas if necessary. I don't expect to find any of these things sub slab in the area where we will be working but I just want to be prepared. Also, I've seen where sonar (I think it was sonar) has been used to look underground for things. The resolution has always been crappy and I've only ever heard of it outdoors. I'm just wondering if anyone has ever heard of it used in this application and whether it even could be employed to look through tile and concrete slab in order to give me a clear (or clear enough) picture of what is underneath?

So if any of you commercial guys feel like chiming in, ... let 'er rip.
 

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It's been a few yrs but I seem to remember having a company come in and X-ray the slab to look for stress cables or support cables, (not sure what they were called)and electrical conduit. They would usually do this at night and would have to clear the area of all people. So I am fairly certain it was some kind of X-ray device they were using. They would mark the floors so that we would have a better chance of not hitting anything. The ones I remember were fairly accurate.
 

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What is GPR?

Ground Penetrating Radar or GPR is used to locate materials, voids, and cracks.
Why Use GPR?

Non-Destructive - Ground Penetrating Radar provides a Non-Destructive means to locate items within materials.
Operates anywhere - GPR can be used to visualize numerous materials, voids, cracks, and leaks at slab grade that X-Ray simply cannot do.
No Radiation - GPR uses NO RADIATION!! There is no need to clear workers from any area because of the negative health effects of radioactive materials. This means less downtime for your jobsite.
Reduces Time - GPR reduces the time needed to meet your deadlines. GPR can locate items in realtime avoiding film developing times. GPR operates in realtime. Scans are available within minutes.
How is it Done?

Electromagnetic Radar waves are passed through concrete, earth, etc. and reflected off of anything in their path. The reflected wave data is retrieved and interpreted by a certified GPR Technician.
Examples of Jobs Performed:
A leaking pipe at slab grade was identified to limit the digging necessary to replace the segment of pipe below a residential property. The location of a leak in a subsurface pipe is undetectable by any other means.
An underground tank was located using GPR for replacement. The tank was to be reused for another purpose and could not be damaged. GPR was used to locate the tank. The size, shape, and depth were located quickly and the tank successfully removed.
If concrete coring is being done the technician will identify a safe area without cutting rebar or Post Tension Cables. Ground Penetrating Radar can aid Law Enforcement by locating evidence


Looks like things have moved on since the last time I did it hope this helps.


 

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I would definately call someone with plenty of experience, refrences, and the right equipment. As a building contractor myself I have seen many things being burried under a slab.
 

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Write the contract to include; private locates for water, you can camera lines to locate sewer, GPR for slab map. The company here is called Acuren inspections. Then, write in your contract that extreme site conditions will require a change order. Regarding the liability, plainly lay it out to what your responsibilities are under the contract, and what you will not be held liable for. Then have an attorney look it over for future contracts, then live by it.:boxing:

We've wandered into somewhat unfamiliar territory in that we are writing a contract for some rather extensive commercial (church) sub slab drainage piping repair.

We have included in the past, for much smaller projects, language in our contracts releasing us from liability from anything that might get torn up during cutting, breaking, and excavation.

What I'm wondering is two things: How should we word this language so as to be very clear about what we can't know and can't be responsible for without creating undue alarm or concern that their building is going to be destroyed or someone hurt or killed. The second thing I'm wondering is how does it need to be worded so that it actually affords me legal protection or can it even do that at all? (oh, hey, this is LegalZone lawyer's forum right? I'm a diy iron clad contract writer and I just have this little question.)

I don't expect any problems and am already planning on having a certified electrician standing by during all saw cutting operations who can shut everything down quickly if necessary. We will also have someone on station to kill the gas if necessary. I don't expect to find any of these things sub slab in the area where we will be working but I just want to be prepared. Also, I've seen where sonar (I think it was sonar) has been used to look underground for things. The resolution has always been crappy and I've only ever heard of it outdoors. I'm just wondering if anyone has ever heard of it used in this application and whether it even could be employed to look through tile and concrete slab in order to give me a clear (or clear enough) picture of what is underneath?

So if any of you commercial guys feel like chiming in, ... let 'er rip.
 

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Water Whisperer
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The wording should be something like this: "Say your prayers because we all gonna die. Also, we didn't build this rat trap, so don't go blaming us for anything that happens. Allah is Good."

Clear enough?
 
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