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Discussion Starter #21
the standard wrench with teeth has a much wider range of use, so to take up room on the truck with something you may use once in a while...eh, I say no...but to buy and have it because you want it and may use it around the house..sure why not...



Maybe it's just the way I move my hands but sometimes the pipe wrench just seems to not let go and you have to struggle each time to get it off and readjust it. I think most of it is the play in the jaw, it can swing left/right a lot in addition to foward back. Sometimes I find a flat jaw much easier to use.


















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Maybe it's just the way I move my hands but sometimes the pipe wrench just seems to not let go and you have to struggle each time to get it off and readjust it. I think most of it is the play in the jaw, it can swing left/right a lot in addition to foward back. Sometimes I find a flat jaw much easier to use.
















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Squeeze the cogs below the adjustment wheel, this will make the pipe wrench release it's grip.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Squeeze the cogs below the adjustment wheel, this will make the pipe wrench release it's grip.



I get what you're saying and my first thought is thanks, I know how to use a pipe wrench, moving the jaw back by squeezing the tail of the upper jaw to the body is a common movement.


My second thought is what the heck are you calling cogs? To most americans a cog is the same as a gear or sprocket. It's a circle(sometimes oval) with teeth on it. Are you calling the teeth cogs?




Is french your first language or english? Both?















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I get what you're saying and my first thought is thanks, I know how to use a pipe wrench, moving the jaw back by squeezing the tail of the upper jaw to the body is a common movement.


My second thought is what the heck are you calling cogs? To most americans a cog is the same as a gear or sprocket. It's a circle(sometimes oval) with teeth on it. Are you calling the teeth cogs?




Is french your first language or english? Both?















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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A cog is a tooth of a gear or cogwheel or the gear itself.

I would say teeth(hook jaw based on the net) are those that hang onto the pipe. Cogs would be the threaded shank, like you said, round/circle with teeth.
 

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Is french your first language or english? Both?















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The only time I use English is here and maybe once every 3 months at a customer's house, restaurant or in a store. Oui Oui. :wink:

I went to an English school but all the kids except a few were all French, the teachers would go nuts as we spoke French all the time in and out of classes . :vs_laugh: Some of us would get caught by teachers who were peeved and received disciplinary homework. Our parents sent us there to learn a secondary language...
 

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Discussion Starter #26
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A cog is a tooth of a gear or cogwheel or the gear itself.

I would say teeth(hook jaw based on the net) are those that hang onto the pipe. Cogs would be the threaded shank, like you said, round/circle with teeth.

Your definition says it can be the whole gear or just the teeth on the gear. I have never heard cog refer only to the teeth on the gear. Really cog is regarded as an outdated/unused word in my world.


Yes the jaws have teeth that grip the pipe but gears also have teeth. Technically the shank of the jaw is not a gear but a bolt. This means it doesn't have teeth or cogs on the shank but threads. They may be interrupted threads but they are still threads and that is why they have an adjustment NUT.



Short answer, a pipe wrench has no gear or cog, only an interrupted helical screw and a nut.






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Your definition says it can be the whole gear or just the teeth on the gear. I have never heard cog refer only to the teeth on the gear. Really cog is regarded as an outdated/unused word in my world.


Yes the jaws have teeth that grip the pipe but gears also have teeth. Technically the shank of the jaw is not a gear but a bolt. This means it doesn't have teeth or cogs on the shank but threads. They may be interrupted threads but they are still threads and that is why they have an adjustment NUT.



Short answer, a pipe wrench has no gear or cog, only an interrupted helical screw and a nut.






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When is the written exam on this? :vs_laugh:
 

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A cog is a tooth of a gear or cogwheel or the gear itself.

I would say teeth(hook jaw based on the net) are those that hang onto the pipe. Cogs would be the threaded shank, like you said, round/circle with teeth.

heres a better definition...a bar or wheel...













noun
noun: cog; plural noun: cogs



  1. a wheel or bar with a series of projections on its edge, which transfers motion by engaging with projections on another wheel or bar.



    • each of the projections on a cog.







Phrases
a cog in the machine — a small or insignificant member of a larger organization or system."copywriters have been seen as just a cog in the big advertising machine"




Origin
 

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Seems we have a few interpreters in this group, maybe you guys could become lawyers, they say about lawyers it's the way you interpret things. <img src="http://www.plumbingzone.com/images/smilies/wink.png" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" />
They might even be able to be religious scholars seeing as how that saying applies to those holy books as well, haha.
 

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Seems we have a few interpreters in this group, maybe you guys could become lawyers, they say about lawyers it's the way you interpret things. :wink:
if lawyers it would be how you WANT to interpret it..for your benefit.....not what it was meant to be...:vs_laugh::vs_laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #34
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Discussion Starter #36
My antique spud wrench, early 1900's small an has a wide jaw. Love it



I have like 7+ of those. That is likely post ww2. They are usually called "auto" wrenches because for included them in tool kits with their model A, T, etc, vehicles. The ford versions have a squareish nub off the tail for unscrewing oil plugs or something.










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My antique spud wrench, early 1900's small an has a wide jaw. Love it



I have like 7+ of those. That is likely post ww2. They are usually called "auto" wrenches because for included them in tool kits with their model A, T, etc, vehicles. The ford versions have a squareish nub off the tail for unscrewing oil plugs or something.










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Cool, learn somthin new everyday, picked it up last year for 5 bucks
 

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I have like 7+ of those. That is likely post ww2. They are usually called "auto" wrenches because for included them in tool kits with their model A, T, etc, vehicles. The ford versions have a squareish nub off the tail for unscrewing oil plugs or something.










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same here, over the years I have just ended up with a bucket full of those type wrenches, I cant remember the last time using them for anything..
its strange to see the obsoletion of tools as time goes by, how many old plumbing tools used 50, 60 or 80 years ago are still used now..or if we have ever seen what they even looked like...and what will be the next tool to go extinct???
 

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canuckPlumBbob
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I have like 7+ of those. That is likely post ww2. They are usually called "auto" wrenches because for included them in tool kits with their model A, T, etc, vehicles. The ford versions have a squareish nub off the tail for unscrewing oil plugs or something.










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same here, over the years I have just ended up with a bucket full of those type wrenches, I cant remember the last time using them for anything..
its strange to see the obsoletion of tools as time goes by, how many old plumbing tools used 50, 60 or 80 years ago are still used now..or if we have ever seen what they even looked like...and what will be the next tool to go extinct???
The next tool to go extinct will be a copper cutter lol
 

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Discussion Starter #40
The next tool to go extinct will be a copper cutter lol





Hardly, We still plumb some houses in copper. Baseboard is done in copper a lot too. So many houses have copper and while it can be a pain sometimes not to burn a house down, when a fitting in a bad spot leaks sometimes you can't fit press or crimp tools in that space where a torch will fit without opening more wall.





I think the torch would go before the cutter. Propress breathed new life into copper pipe and that copper pipe will get repaired at times with a torch because of space constraints. Also, even when we do jobs in propress there are some joints we sweat because they have almost no nipple between fittings and if one joint leaked we would have to cut out a bunch of fittings.










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