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Found out this has been posted, already. My bad.


















Don't worry.....it's still funny as hell...…….:vs_laugh:

I showed that to a plumber buddy of mine and we both busted out loud laughing {even though I had already seen twice by then}….as he's laughing he says...."That could happen to us!"
 

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I feel for the guy because it nearly happened to me once. I was going to replace a faucet and when I went to shut off the water the angle stop just shot out at me. I had barely turned it, it wasn't like I cranked on it with a tool. Luckily it only had about 50 psi to the line so I was able to hold the water back with my thumb. I yelled for the homeowner and thankfully they knew where the main shut off was located.
This guy looks to be dealing with considerably more pressure. I've seen this video a few times but I can't help but rewatch it whenever it's linked, haha.
 

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I actually had that happen to me once. I wasn’t trying to replace a stop, I was trying to replace a stool supply line and ball cock.

I was probably about 4 months in out in California. It was at night, in a condo without it’s own main shut off. As soon as I started to unscrewing the 3/8” from the stop and the entire stop popped off! Compression ring and nut!

Had to run out to my truck for a new stop, and this was before shark bites. Got the nut on was easy, the ring was the hard part! I had quickly clamped the valve body with a pair of vice grips to push it on. I left the valve open to not have the fight the pressure as much.

Thankfully it was a cold line, but it was winter and in the 50s. Only time I ever used the heater in California!

The HO surprisingly understood, and thankfully was from the east coast like me. Anywhere the water ended up was all tile floor. Both the HO and I worked together with our own shop vacs.

IIRC, he gave a decent tip too, $10-$20.
 

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I wonder if it was side-job......and if so, do ya think he handed them a bill at the end?...…….:vs_laugh:
I'm playing detective here. :detective::detective:

He's a plumber by trade with all the plumbing parts he had in the bucket. He's changing out a lav faucet for a new delta, the new popup is in the sink. However he's doing it in the evening as a side job as people would never pay extra money after hours for a job like this.

They call whomever and to turn it off its 150$, probably the curb main. Finally the landlord with the keys to the mech room shows up and the plumber closes the main somewhere.
 

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I feel for the guy.

I had a corporation stop fail on me when I was tapping a main. I guess the good thing was that it was only holding partial pressure, so that the auto-feeders can work.

I changed the main stop, live. Thankfully, that saddle didn't experience failure as well. Take a hose, ram it through your replacement main stop, ram the hose into the saddle, then the main so you don't have to fight the pressure while threading. Pull the hose out, and shut off the main stop.

It worked, what didn't work so well was fighting -15 Celsius completely soaked...
 

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That's why if I'm ever touching a old main shut off my curb key is in the service box.
The best part is at 5;40 "call the police and get them to shut the water off."
 

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That's why if I'm ever touching a old main shut off my curb key is in the service box.
The best part is at 5;40 "call the police and get them to shut the water off."
While I rarely touch curb-stops after installation, I have been part of Valve Detail. When we are digging next to any Water Main, especially Primary or Secondary Feeders (definition: Primary Feeder 300mm +, Secondary Feeder 200mm to 300mm+ & situation dependent) I prefer to know where the valves that isolate the line are. Most of the time, it is only 2. I have seen 3.

By law, at the very least in Ontario, if an issue is public safety, I can, and I will, shut down and attempt to isolate a mainline.

I was in a trench, doing a tie-in, when the city worker erroneously opened, instead of closed one valve. When I cracked the cap... It blew apart. That is why we are repeatedly screamed at, in our early years, to NOT stand in front of a water main. Stand off to the side.

That was a 150 mm (6 inch) Water main. I was in a 3 meter cut. Full pressure (roughly 60-80 PSI). Had I been slower, I wouldn't have climbed out; I would have floated out. It was a mess. The 20-30 turns to shut that valve, even with a key handy, the amount of water was large.

I do not ever want to see a 300 mm main blow. Spec'd installation, and left alone, I have no problems walking on them, or whatever. Once hydraulic power is brought into the mix, it goes south quick.

Personally, I still have not decided what I would do if (*shudder* when?) that scenario happens. I would love to be able to say "I would do my job." On the other hand, what might fly out of my mouth could very well be "I warned you. See you when I see you, and best of luck dealing with this mess. I'm leaving."
 
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