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That's because the hi vel pump(s) are on the wrong side of boiler... and if its a Junkirk boiler, you got problems, sir.. that's where my 'invention'of the air scoop nipple comes in.
This is only true when the balancing configuration on the venturi is set sideways on an airscoop that's engineered to purge both air and sediment, otherwise you use a torque wrench to re-balance the flux capacitor....or, you're saying you have a way to squeeze a can vent on a rad.

If you're scratching your head, relax, I was kidding...on the first part.
 

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pilot light said:
Yes monoflow system is the best I have 100000 monoflow tees from 1/2 inch to 3/4 to sell also 1 inch! If interested will send price list! WTF! :laughing:
I'm curious, do you understand your posts??? Because I can't make heads or thermocouples out of them

€¤¤{{:( :( ¥& <¤¢|{{¤¢& ¤:p :) €€:) :p {] [{<& & > {¥¢~~~^°=¬\/¬/\
 

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MonoFlow systems are one of the best ways you can do hydronics. Each tee has a diverter that forces the water to the side outlet... one is installed each for the supply and return both in opposite directions...this way the water is forced up into the rad and the return of the rad is diverted into the main loop... very seldom will you get air locked in the rads with this type of system... The whole idea was that each rad can be turned off or throttled to control flow and heat in rad individually and it would not affect the main loop.
Contractors, please stick to making material lists, logistics/scheduling, and caring for your tools. Leave it to engineers for design. I worked for a good contractor out of engineering college for a few years (like 100 people) and thought I knew everything too. The world would be better and your still going to have your service calls. Mono flow is definitely not the best; maybe cheaper/faster. I only learned it from a low-end Residential contractor after a decade of professionally engineering mechanical systems in commercial and residential buildings, so I had to dig deeper on the topic. Mono flow in my opinion, is only good if your doing a FULL CIRCLE LOOP on a LARGE FOOTPRINT floor to save on piping. The zone pump and diverter tees would need to be PRECISELY BALANCED with NO LOCAL CONTROL valves. I wouldn’t even put the shut-off valves in plain sight. Not much room for errors. A little simple engineering principle: A) PARALLEL RESISTANCE IS MUCH LESS than a single path resistance. If you had a local control valve and SHUT OFF A RADIATOR (call it a terminal for simplicity), full flow through the diverter valve would cause a large pressure drop downstream and may disrupt the balancing of the downstream terminals. B) MIXING into a common header would cause the SUPPLY TEMPERATURE TO DECREASE as you go DOWNSTREAM. You can interpolate the effect of each terminal if you consider the initial supply temperature and the performance of the selected terminals. I’d you have many terminals on a loop, or a large terminal is towards the end of the loop, it could throw off the performance I. Those downstream terminals. Probably wouldn’t hurt a radiating baseboard but for some coils, it could greatly affect heat exchange performancefor a house, without too many terminals on one loop, it could work. Sorry for the caps, but we have to do that with lower end contractors who think they know everything but refuse to read anything, let alone research.
 

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Contractors, please stick to making material lists, logistics/scheduling, and caring for your tools. Leave it to engineers for design. I worked for a good contractor out of engineering college for a few years (like 100 people) and thought I knew everything too. The world would be better and your still going to have your service calls. Mono flow is definitely not the best; maybe cheaper/faster. I only learned it from a low-end Residential contractor after a decade of professionally engineering mechanical systems in commercial and residential buildings, so I had to dig deeper on the topic. Mono flow in my opinion, is only good if your doing a FULL CIRCLE LOOP on a LARGE FOOTPRINT floor to save on piping. The zone pump and diverter tees would need to be PRECISELY BALANCED with NO LOCAL CONTROL valves. I wouldn’t even put the shut-off valves in plain sight. Not much room for errors. A little simple engineering principle: A) PARALLEL RESISTANCE IS MUCH LESS than a single path resistance. If you had a local control valve and SHUT OFF A RADIATOR (call it a terminal for simplicity), full flow through the diverter valve would cause a large pressure drop downstream and may disrupt the balancing of the downstream terminals. B) MIXING into a common header would cause the SUPPLY TEMPERATURE TO DECREASE as you go DOWNSTREAM. You can interpolate the effect of each terminal if you consider the initial supply temperature and the performance of the selected terminals. I’d you have many terminals on a loop, or a large terminal is towards the end of the loop, it could throw off the performance I. Those downstream terminals. Probably wouldn’t hurt a radiating baseboard but for some coils, it could greatly affect heat exchange performancefor a house, without too many terminals on one loop, it could work. Sorry for the caps, but we have to do that with lower end contractors who think they know everything but refuse to read anything, let alone research.
Just saving this for later....
 
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