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Any tricks to getting a cable through a cottage (side inlet) tee? Tried all the techniques I knew: reversing the cable for a moment, slowly hand feeding, even switched to a drop head on a smaller cable. No dice.

Didn't really matter in this case as the main line was that pressed tar stuff (Orangeburg?) and ran right under an oak tree. I'd just like the info for the future as the builders around here love those tees for pier and beam houses.
 

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What the heck is a cottage tee?
It's a tee where the middle leg is pointing down and each run has a sweep toward the leg. Should be illegal, and even where it ain't many inspectors won't allow it or will require a cross tee with a Cleanout on the vertical leg.
 
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Like open sights said kink the cable and rotate the drum til the cable is facing down then hand feed. If you’re dealing with a sewer it may be easier just to find the line with a probind rod digging it up and knocking a hole in it. If the lines orange burg you’re not even really hurting it as any drain cleaning done is just basically buying them time till they can replace the line.
 

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Any tricks to getting a cable through a cottage (side inlet) tee? Tried all the techniques I knew: reversing the cable for a moment, slowly hand feeding, even switched to a drop head on a smaller cable. No dice.

Didn't really matter in this case as the main line was that pressed tar stuff (Orangeburg?) and ran right under an oak tree. I'd just like the info for the future as the builders around here love those tees for pier and beam houses.
I've had to deal with these and cross tees before and they make me want to murder people. The best I have done is bending a crescent head some more and then feeding the snake in by hand with a camera next to it so I can watch when the head catches the leg and I can push.

Without a camera it's luck.
 

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Its called a side inlet tee here. Not used very often at all any more. It's mostly for replacing an existing one in a stack vented castiron stack. I actually have one right here in the basement that I was going to replace for a lady but It fell through so I have it sitting for next time I come across one a few years from now probably.

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Actually it was supposed to replace a normal cast iron tee that went to a toilet 90 with side inlet. It was basically redoing it in the original stack vent just in a slightly different configuration.

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These monstrosities, also called side inlet tees I believe:
View attachment 128905
Wisconsin fitting. The 2” side inlet is above the center line of the 3” to maintain the vent.

It’s commonly used for a bathroom group. The 2” would be used for a tub or shower. The 3” horizontal would be the toilet. The lavatory would come from the top.

So you get all three fixtures vented with one stack.

Very common to find those in my area going way back 75+ yrs.
 

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Wisconsin fitting. The 2” side inlet is above the center line of the 3” to maintain the vent.

It’s commonly used for a bathroom group. The 2” would be used for a tub or shower. The 3” horizontal would be the toilet. The lavatory would come from the top.

So you get all three fixtures vented with one stack.

Very common to find those in my area going way back 75+ yrs.
That’s gypsy wagon plumbing
 

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Any tricks to getting a cable through a cottage (side inlet) tee? Tried all the techniques I knew: reversing the cable for a moment, slowly hand feeding, even switched to a drop head on a smaller cable. No dice.

Didn't really matter in this case as the main line was that pressed tar stuff (Orangeburg?) and ran right under an oak tree. I'd just like the info for the future as the builders around here love those tees for pier and beam houses.
If it is a stoppage I would try the Kinetic water ram either general or Milwaukee now makes one, not any help with the snake but could clear the drain, I have had luck with mine.
 

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If it is a stoppage I would try the Kinetic water ram either general or Milwaukee now makes one, not any help with the snake but could clear the drain, I have had luck with mine.
I have been very successful with using my “kinetic water ram” for basin/vanity’s, laundry tubs, tub/showers and shower drains.
I’ve cleared a few toilets with the KWR’s “w/c adaptor”(using a garbage bag to cover the toilet bowl with a hole in It for the KWR to fit into the bowl).

BUT my KWR has a zero percent success rate for clearing blocked kitchen drains.
 

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So what am I missing here? Why doesn't a drop-head on the end of the cable work when cabling down stream from the p-trap of the tub drain? Once the drop-head reaches the inside of the 3" san. tee, it will turn down.

Enlighten me.
 
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