Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am brand new to the plumbing trade. I am starting a plumbing apprenticeship in 3 weeks with a local company here that does mostly residential plumbing/drain cleaning, etc. I am looking to get a good pair of boots for the job and am looking for recommendations.

I am leaning toward the Thorogood 6" Mock Toe Boot. Two question on top of the suggestion: 1) How important is a specifically waterproof boot or is it something I could carry for those cases (like a hiking boot for extreme mud or flooding) and 2) Is there a necessity for a steel toe boot?

Thanks in advance.:bangin: (my 5 year daughter insisted I add an emoji)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,997 Posts
But to answer your questions, it depends on what you like. I like steel toe, waterproof and 8". My Master likes tennis shoes and will not walk in anything without rubbers. He rides me about wearing my boots in sewage, but I don't wear them in my house, off and on a special shelf in the Michigan basement.

Welcome to the trade! It really sucks in the beginning,but when you get good it's easy money, but sometimes still sucks.

You will eventually learn to never say "I've seen it all." Because you never will!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,997 Posts
No need for steel toe in residential. I only where Red Wing boots, they're more comfortable than tennis shoes.
Ever have a full ancient 200#+ water softener fall on your foot from the head breaking off, breaking the step under your foot in a non steel boot?

I can say from experience they are the worth eight months of pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
Ever have a full ancient 200#+ water softener fall on your foot from the head breaking off, breaking the step under your foot in a non steel boot?

I can say from experience they are the worth eight months of pain.
Luckily I haven't had anything heavy drop on my feet. The company I used to work for made it mandatory to wear steel toe boots. They're way too uncomfortable for service work to me.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,632 Posts
I primarily do resid. service and repair. I have used some type of sneaker or black leather loafers for inside work, and I keep a pair of black leather engineer's boots {outlaw biker boots} in the truck for crawling under homes' crawlspaces {plus a Tyvek pair of coveralls to protect my clothes} and for digging trenches.

I just bought a new pair of men's black leather loafers yesterday, no joke. With a pair of charcoal grey uniform pants and a collared, button-down uniform shirt with my company name and personal name embroidered on the shirt, the black loafers with dark black cotton socks looks neat and professional. Customers appreciate a professional looking plumber.

Plus for the customers who remove their shoes when entering their own homes, I can easily slip my shoes off rather than fumble with those blue shoe covers. I hate those things; trying to carry tools and a toilet through the front door and having to put the shoe coverings on. I'd rather just slip the shoes off. Just a caution, be careful not to step on anything that can puncture or cut your feet. I worked w/ a plumber long ago who told customers that insurance regulations required that he not remove his shoes upon entering a home since it was equivalent to removing safety equipment and if he got injured, the insurance would not cover it. May be some truth to that.

I would never show up to someones's home or business with a T-shirt and Bermuda shorts. Some plumbers dress that way, but that is un-professional and too casual for my taste.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Right. The company I work for has uniforms and hygiene regulations and I think that makes a huge difference in perception, especially when the cost of a project is more than one was expecting. I am though bummed to have to shave my beard of 8 years but sacrifices must be made for my wife and kids.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,997 Posts
Beards are common around here and excepted in my area. Summer it's shorts and a nice tee shirt with boots. I'm still searching for the right polo to embroider, but found some decent ones at Wally World for $7.88.

I take my boots off often, unless a tenant annoys me, then it's osha excuse.

I've never found a boot cover that fits my boots.

Sorry about the beard! My last Master required employees to have facial hair, now that I my own boss and help out my new Master it's my call. I do prefer professionalism in appearance, and people around here understand my attire.

But getting into plumbing is a good move. After quitting it for years I found my way back. Now, with what I know and what I can do and charge for my knowledge and ability... pirceless. And with that said I will say I have so much more to learn!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,157 Posts
More than one set.

I always liked 5 buckle overshoes, for really messy work.

At least 6" or 8" tall work boots safety non-steal toe for remodel or new construction (save your ankles and toes). Regular black safety toe low top shoes for service work (faucets, etc. where your not doing heavy work). The regular low tops look professional for service, remodel or constructions work boots.

Same with changes in cloths. I carried a full change of winter & summer clothes year round. I have had to work in a true deep freeze ( 1,600 sq, ft or so. -20 real temp with fans circulating air) in the summer and have had to crawl into a boiler still cooling off in the winter. I tried to tell an apprentice this before, he didn't listen. After a hot summer ground rough where he was drenched we had a call in a regular cooler (about 100' x 200') to repair a roof drain passing through. I couldn't stop laughing at the kid with shorts and a soaked T-shirt.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,997 Posts
Time is up on my boots. Not leaking yet, but getting there. They're heavy, too darn big, so bad that basement stairs become a hazard. I'm contemplating these: http://www.duluthtrading.com/store/mens/footwear/boots/30266.aspx?processor=content

I've found them cheaper on Amazon or eBay... reviews are either one star or five stars. Red wings were once a good boot but the last pair I bought lasted less than the $50 Wally World ones I had been buying once a year.

Just like with anyother new product made today, we are a throwaway society. I'd pay $500 for a GOOD pair of boots that will last me at least five years. But no one makes them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I am brand new to the plumbing trade. I am starting a plumbing apprenticeship in 3 weeks with a local company here that does mostly residential plumbing/drain cleaning, etc. I am looking to get a good pair of boots for the job and am looking for recommendations.

I am leaning toward the Thorogood 6" Mock Toe Boot. Two question on top of the suggestion: 1) How important is a specifically waterproof boot or is it something I could carry for those cases (like a hiking boot for extreme mud or flooding) and 2) Is there a necessity for a steel toe boot?

Thanks in advance.:bangin: Some American work boots(my 5 year daughter insisted I add an emoji)
I bought some a while back, They started rubbing at the sides of my big toes, The work then gave me some trainer-looking safety boots but even though they're an 11 (my size) it's the same...rubbing near the toes If I have a larger size they obviously don't fit right and slip up and down at the back.
 

·
Registered
Pornstar, Service Plumber
Joined
·
8,654 Posts
I bought some a while back, They started rubbing at the sides of my big toes, The work then gave me some trainer-looking safety boots but even though they're an 11 (my size) it's the same...rubbing near the toes If I have a larger size they obviously don't fit right and slip up and down at the back.
You don't belong here, leave.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top