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I've seen some the bigger 15" and above pvc welded , but it gets pretty hot .So anything flammable around the pipe would have to be protected. Sounds like the job for a mission banb or no hub whichever you prefer
 

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Lego Expert
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you could try cutting a fernco and wrap it round the pipe.

hide the cut line, and you will be the only person that knows about it.
 

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I would cut the 3" and install a new 12" section of pvc and 2 no hub bands.

I just had a lawyer call me and ask me if I wanted to be an expert witness, a cabinet installer in a new house put 3 holes in a pvc drain, a plumber was hired to make a repair, he used epoxy, stated it in his invoice, it leaked over 5 years and caused a huge amount of damage in the walls and back of these cabinets, etc. the sewer smell was around for a year, multiple people came out and looked, could not find the issue, I don't know all the particulars, but I do know that the plumber is now getting sued by the homeowners.

I would not want something like that coming back to bite me, especially 5 years down the road, all because it wasn't done right.

I didn't take the expert witness gig, don;t have the time.
 

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I would cut the 3" and install a new 12" section of pvc and 2 no hub bands.

I just had a lawyer call me and ask me if I wanted to be an expert witness, a cabinet installer in a new house put 3 holes in a pvc drain, a plumber was hired to make a repair, he used epoxy, stated it in his invoice, it leaked over 5 years and caused a huge amount of damage in the walls and back of these cabinets, etc. the sewer smell was around for a year, multiple people came out and looked, could not find the issue, I don't know all the particulars, but I do know that the plumber is now getting sued by the homeowners.

I would not want something like that coming back to bite me, especially 5 years down the road, all because it wasn't done right.

I didn't take the expert witness gig, don;t have the time.
That is because the lawyer is grasping at straws...

Why didn't the lawyer call the second guy that did the final repair?
 

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I have a "friend" who glued 3/4's of a coupling on a sch 40 storm sewer he accidentally sawcut the top couple inches of.

"He" applied primer and glue to both pieces and snapped the split coupling onto the pipe.....

I would never do that personally:whistling2:
One of my friends has done that as well... :laughing:
 

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That is because the lawyer is grasping at straws...

Why didn't the lawyer call the second guy that did the final repair?
He is suing the plumber that made the epoxy repair.

Grasping at straws or not, weather he has a case or not, it still isn't something someone wouldn't want to deal with. don;t need any stress like that to cause me time, money and more stress!
 

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SimplePlumber said:
If it's for a customer, cut it out and repair.

For yourself, any one of the many rumored quick fixes listed here may work out just fine.
This guy's 100% right. Don't shortcut when charging good money. I've done that repair countless times and each and every time I cut it out and replace the section of pipe. I've never melted or welded plastic it personally it doesn't sound appropriate IMO. Not in this case anyways
 

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I've never had any luck with using slip couplings on a vertical run for PVC, ABS has been fine. I would just cut it and use two transition fittings and no hub clamps like others in this thread have said.

On a sort of related note, we got a call the other day, someone drilled a hole in the sprinkler line putting in a shower rod... On the 7th floor in a very ritzy condo building...
 

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I've used slip couplings many times on mostly 3" vertical pvc lines, for this exact reason. Someone put screws through, installing cabinets, or nails from nail guns through, base moulding, or crown moulding. ( I understand if you start getting into bigger diameter pipes, larger than 4", you may need a different method).

It takes time to prep. Sand the inside of slip couplings a bit, & you will be surprised how much easier they will slide on pipe.

Can't even fathum, why a pro would go out to a job, & want to make a quick or hack fix, by melting, or what ever, & then take responsibility for that repair.:no:

My father use to say, fix it right the 1st time, & the customer pays for it, fix it right the 2nd time, & you pay for it.

IMO, if there is any kind of hole in a pvc pipe, that section of pipe needs to be removed, no matter the cost, and then replaced. Anything other than that, don't need a professional.
 

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I agree with you don about either slip couplings or bands being used here, but welding pvc is more common than you realize . There is training that goes into it and is perfectly legal if done properly by a trained professional.
 

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Expansion joints work great for this kind of thing they must make them for pvc. Don't you guys have to use them to ? Here I think its every other story can't remember off the top of my head. I do the odd log house and they claim up to a inch of settling per foot of log " vertically" So that's where I use them.
 

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My father use to say said:
I couldn't agree more, you father is 1000% correct. I always think the same thing, customer is paying me right now, if I have to go back, I am paying me!

Do it right the first time and make money doing it.
 

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Hot aie plastic welding is not a "rumoured quick fix". I had to employ it under supervision of the local inspector numerous times.

For the right application, it's worth its weight in Canadian Loonies!

:laughing:
I used "rumored" to provide a tongue-in-cheek word for all of the posters saying they knew a "friend" doing quick temporary fixes. I wasn't saying anything about any particular one of them.

I have the stance that the moment any customer calls a professional...regardless of the industry...it is that professionals responsibility to repair the problem professionally. No welding, epoxy, duct tape, screws, silicone, etc., unless it is the industry standard way to do it.

It is typically laziness that drives these types of quick fixes. Things like...I'd have to run to the supply house for slip couplings; It's 4:30pm and I have another job to go to; and the like, are standard excuses of not taking the time to do it right. I know...since I did these types of repairs when I was first starting out until my mentors showed me the "light"...which was actually the light I saw when one of them cracked me upside the head.

The OP is taking the time to ask what the best way was to fix an issue. It is our responsibility in this professional forum to give them what they are asking for.

(hop off soapbox)

As far as plastic welding...I've never done it myself, but even if it was an industry standard repair, I can't see the value of it to their customer in this circumstance if it needs to be done under supervision of an inspector.

I must admit, it is a cool looking tool :)
 

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What would you say is the best way to repair a leak in a 3" pvc stack in a wall that is leaking from 2 screw holes about 1" apart caused by the closet hanger system?

Cut the pipe and install a no hub?

Clean the holes and roll glue into them?

Silicone?

Something else?
Easy job
we get tons of them nails , screws & A/C guys drilling through our pipes
after we dig the concrete from around the pipe we clean the hole or holes with clear primer next we hot Glue the holes than we wrap the area with aluminum tape. a nice neat lifetime fix
or you an make a snap cover with a piece of 3" PVC pipe primer & glue
 

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Reverend, R.S.E., Master Plumber
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For tricky or tight spots with holes/cracks that can’t easily be replaced, try this:

-Sand around and clean the holes.
-Then take a scrap piece of the “same time of pipe” and Cut it with a fine tooth saw, collect a good size pile the fine PVC sawdust.
- Mix the PVC sawdust with the right type of glue- for that type of pipe, to make a “PASTE”.
-apply PVC glue to the hole/area, then use the “PVC paste” to fill holes, cracks, leaks etc.

*use rubber gloves to apply the PVC paste

*This can be done with ABS too.

you’re welcome…
 

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Easy job
we get tons of them nails , screws & A/C guys drilling through our pipes
after we dig the concrete from around the pipe we clean the hole or holes with clear primer next we hot Glue the holes than we wrap the area with aluminum tape. a nice neat lifetime fix
or you an make a snap cover with a piece of 3" PVC pipe primer & glue
Why are you going back so far to post on, 9 years is long ago,
 
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