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For this requirement, a garden hose can be used. The water will be released into the bucket or container you prepared using a hose pipe connected to the tank outlet.
Step 1: Turn off The Water Heater
Step 2: Switch off The Water Source And Open Faucets
Step 3: Take off The Faulty Drain Valve
Step 4: Attach Hose Pipe And Let The Water Drain
 

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I aint CPV see in it?
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guys. this is hands down the easiest way to drain a clogged water heater, and we have done it numerous times and has yet not work. If it is clogged, put a washing machine hose on the end of your drain hose, leave other end connected to drain valve on water heater, with the valve still open. Connect washing machine hose to closest spigot. open relief valve, turn on spigot and back flush it for half a minute or so. leave relief valve open, disconnect hose from spigot and it should start draining like a champ out of the hose. If not, try it again. A few of them we have had to do a few times until it clears a good path out in the tank. It works every time, and it saves a lot of time.
 

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guys. this is hands down the easiest way to drain a clogged water heater, and we have done it numerous times and has yet not work. If it is clogged, put a washing machine hose on the end of your drain hose, leave other end connected to drain valve on water heater, with the valve still open. Connect washing machine hose to closest spigot. open relief valve, turn on spigot and back flush it for half a minute or so. leave relief valve open, disconnect hose from spigot and it should start draining like a champ out of the hose. If not, try it again. A few of them we have had to do a few times until it clears a good path out in the tank. It works every time, and it saves a lot of time.
Why not just connect your hose to the bottom and then while the water is still on to the heater, open the drain valve and let it run for a few minutes before you turn the water off and open relief valve to give air.

Of that doesn’t work I cut the hot side and use a piece of 1/2” pex connected to my hose to siphon it out.

I’ve also replaced the drain valve to a full port.
 

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guys. this is hands down the easiest way to drain a clogged water heater, and we have done it numerous times and has yet not work. If it is clogged, put a washing machine hose on the end of your drain hose, leave other end connected to drain valve on water heater, with the valve still open. Connect washing machine hose to closest spigot. open relief valve, turn on spigot and back flush it for half a minute or so. leave relief valve open, disconnect hose from spigot and it should start draining like a champ out of the hose. If not, try it again. A few of them we have had to do a few times until it clears a good path out in the tank. It works every time, and it saves a lot of time.
How high does the sediment typically go in the tank over there? And how much does that extra weight factor into the guys’ work load, for example on basement jobs?
Here, sometimes it’s an issue yeah. Basements are rare. Stairs less so.
I’m lucky, never had to backwash a water heater to get it to drain.
 

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Why not just connect your hose to the bottom and then while the water is still on to the heater, open the drain valve and let it run for a few minutes before you turn the water off and open relief valve to give air.

Of that doesn’t work I cut the hot side and use a piece of 1/2” pex connected to my hose to siphon it out.

I’ve also replaced the drain valve to a full port.
Sometimes they are clogged so tight the city pressure will not bust thru calcium build up,but it might do it going the other way as rockstarplumber advised up above

I have had several heaters clogged so bad the city pressure would not flush thru it,we use a transfer pump
 

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Why not just connect your hose to the bottom and then while the water is still on to the heater, open the drain valve and let it run for a few minutes before you turn the water off and open relief valve to give air.

Of that doesn’t work I cut the hot side and use a piece of 1/2” pex connected to my hose to siphon it out.

I’ve also replaced the drain valve to a full port.
Have you ever taken a gas control valve out, or bottom element, and just bypassed the sediment? Might be leaving too much weight in the tank, yeah.
 

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Nope, if they don’t drain after I flush them out a little I siphon them out. If by chance I can’t siphon it because of its install location I use a pump.
How much sediment in your area? Not much usually here. It’s the drain valve that clogs, so it gets removed typically.
 

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For this requirement, a garden hose can be used. The water will be released into the bucket or container you prepared using a hose pipe connected to the tank outlet.
Step 1: Turn off The Water Heater
Step 2: Switch off The Water Source And Open Faucets
Step 3: Take off The Faulty Drain Valve
Step 4: Attach Hose Pipe And Let The Water Drain
Still no intro. Please follow forum rules.
 

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I aint CPV see in it?
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Most heaters here are in the garage on the floor or on a platform. Backwashing works for us. Usually a spigot right by the garage door. Lots of sediment here. Lots of calcium in water. We now offer a 3m descaler with a replacement. Never siphoned I one. Don’t need to. Our method works for us. There are no basements here. Unless the lot has a drastic slope. Water table is too high and we’re kinda flat.
 

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Yeah no kidding you are. And why are you wasting time siphoning when there’s no sediment. Get the drain valve out of the way and drain it. Lol
It doesn’t take much sediment to stop them up. Most any old heater has enough sediment to stop up a old style plastic drain.

There’s no wasted time siphoning it. It’s quicker and safer than trying to replace the drain. The plastic drains can break off leaving you with a hole to plug.

I work smarter not harder.
 

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I aint CPV see in it?
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It doesn’t take much sediment to stop them up. Most any old heater has enough sediment to stop up a old style plastic drain.

There’s no wasted time siphoning it. It’s quicker and safer than trying to replace the drain. The plastic drains can break off leaving you with a hole to plug.

I work smarter not harder.
Once we get them outside, and have rolled them out full we smack that plastic sh!t right the F off with a hammer and poke a crew driver in there, then it becomes a real squirter.
 

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It doesn’t take much sediment to stop them up. Most any old heater has enough sediment to stop up a old style plastic drain.

There’s no wasted time siphoning it. It’s quicker and safer than trying to replace the drain. The plastic drains can break off leaving you with a hole to plug.

I work smarter not harder.
Smarter not harder yeah. That’s why my previous post mentioned gas control valves if the dv’s brittle, meaning plastic. You must have missed that.
 

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Smarter not harder yeah. That’s why my previous post mentioned gas control valves if the dv’s brittle, meaning plastic. You must have missed that.
I don’t find siphoning through the hot side a problem at all.

I have to cut the hot side pipe anyway so then I just drop my pex down to the bottom then pull it back about 8” to keep it out of the sediment.

No extra work removing control valves or replacing drain valves.

Pro tips ! ✌
 
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