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www.DunbarPlumbing.com
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This "can" be done:

You all have seen the Dolphin toilet, and I think that will become a part of the equation. That's progress.


Here's what I want to do in direction of toilets, myself as a contribution to the history of plumbing as it is known for its advances in its progression.


I certainly don't have the money to pull it off, but some brainiac does and will find this thread someday and make a go at it, might make millions and so be it. I'll take the credit for coming up with the idea as I think it warrants a change.

Disposals: Rubber Boot Connections

The New Kitchen Sinks: Rubber Boot Connections

Joining of dissimilar piping, above or below ground: Rubber Boot Connections

Submersible Pump Check Valves: Rubber Boot Connections


For toilets?

Envision a flange with the same slotted appearance but the PVC pipe leading to the flange goes through it, protrudes 2.5 to 3" above the floor.

A newly designed toilet with a recessed horn that has a coupled rubber boot connector that has a port hole on one side to allen key and tighten that connection. The fitting would be brand specific to the fixture and would have to be set and tightened to the newly designed toilet flange first.

Then the toilet gets set down and the rubber connection is sealed tight when it is installed and tightened through the ported hole on the side.

This could be designed in a way where this "new" flange would have an automatic preset height of this protruding pipe that the rubber boot slips onto, that way there's no room for error.

Why has the wax ring not been updated all these years? I can sit on my toilet in KY and take a dump, have a conversation with a woman in hong kong for $8.99 a minute...but we can't have a better way for making a watertight connection for a toilet?

YES, WE CAN.


The ASSE/ASTM works through the lines of politics/money. You might not like that statement but I'll tell you what; for as much crap that's out there that doesn't work? Somebody got paid off or somebody knew somebody to let the garbage exist in job security and wealth for others. No way it didn't.

That's their game and not mine, but that's how it happens.

But someone has to believe that in all the years of how things work in this plumbing industry, the development of the water closet has seen many advances but no one has taken the consideration of a connection that's prone to failure for many reasons. Rubber/foam rings always gain a memory over time and start to leak. Plumber's Putty even though very reliable for most applications, has a good longevity standard but isn't resilient to water in the long run. I've seen putty break down over constant exposure to water. If it is thin it really takes on degredation.

But I feel that a rubber connection of this nature would be the end of wax ring applications for good, the margin of error would go way down given the close tolerance application of what we know and experience with rubber boot connectors.

Is it fast and easy? Is it a cure all for the DIY/homeowner wanting to set their own toilet? Of course. But plumbers these days want fast and easy and make a buck so I'm going to play a part in that equation now. :laughing:

Another little "nice" design change they could put to a toilet is a concealed/covered 1.5" threaded port that enters the last turn of the toilet trap that allows instant access to the toilet to run a cable down through that toilet without having to remove it from the flange. A special "key" that I could make for the cleanout cap for $10.99 and that would be the only way to get it open. YES!

Now the goal here is to seed the mind of someone who actually has the money to make this happen, change the toilet forever as we know it and make something that doesn't create germs/disease/destruction from an old design that needs to be changed completely. We've come this far with spaghetti water lines and push fit connectors, crimp-n-go and push fit this and that, glue this here get out of my way I got garden hose gas line coming through! attitude,

why not a rubber boot connection toilet. Perfect.
 

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philosopher and statesmen
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7,712 Posts
Dunbar....hope for change

Dunbar...you must have had a bad day with re-setting a bunch of nasty toilets down in Kaintucky.....

I myself had a bad day fighting an Elkay drinking fountain..
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actually that sounds like a great idea,

but these rubber boots would have to be a universal fit to all brands of toilets, I dont think they will ever want to re--do the whole industry over this ........

the wax rings are extremely cheap and make a common toilet flange universal and easy to change out or repair..anywhere 20 years from now...and they keep
a lot of us busy with doing that nasty work...



but like our great president says...


hope for change.....

Oh yes we can.....



.
 

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Toto already makes one that uses a special flange and the horn of the toilet slip fits into a rubber boot. You still use a wax to install the special flange/toilet connection although. I dont have a problem with wax seals. People are forgetting that if you plunge a toilet when you have a clogged main or branch line it can blow the waxseal out.
 

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Senior Moment
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If they simply made the horn at the bottom of the toilet about 3-4'' longer, 99% of all toilet leaks at the base would be eliminated. You would still need a wax seal, but it's primary use would be for sewer gas.

The only plausible reason I can think of, for toilet manufacturers not doing this, would be a lot pissed off plumbers with less leaks to fix. Maybe there's a reason I'm not getting, but I've yet to hear one. We discussed this in another thread recently, and nobody had an explanation that made logical sense to me.
 

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I like Dunbar's idea.

Many new toilets, if not most, already have an exposed trap. For one thing, the "standard" 12" connection could be changed to say, 6" so that the traps can drop in a more straight line to the drain. A coupling above the floor could also mean a sort of flanged floor fitting that holds it in place and supports the back end of the toilet. Just make the coupling in different finishes: white, chrome, colors, or have a decorative wrap for it.

**brain pops out of gear**

Then we can redesign the top of the toilet so that we just stick a tube up our hiney and no longer need a bowl. Use a trap primer to flush. Fewer materials and simpler parts.

:eek:
 

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philosopher and statesmen
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7,712 Posts
that is a great idea

If they simply made the horn at the bottom of the toilet about 3-4'' longer, 99% of all toilet leaks at the base would be eliminated. You would still need a wax seal, but it's primary use would be for sewer gas.

The only plausible reason I can think of, for toilet manufacturers not doing this, would be a lot pissed off plumbers with less leaks to fix. Maybe there's a reason I'm not getting, but I've yet to hear one. We discussed this in another thread recently, and nobody had an explanation that made logical sense to me.
you are 100% right ... if they simply made the flange deeper and a lot wider the wax ring would be needed for only sewer gas....


 

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I dont have a problem with toilets leaking after I set them. NEVER. Whats so hard about securing the flange to the floor,making sure the flange bottom is fush and flat against the finished floor,using a quality was ring with no horn and sealing the bowl to the floor with silicone or grout if its tile on the floor? They dont leak folks when you make sure all of the above is done proper. if you are resetting a bowl it must be clean and DRY!
 

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new nickname:Quaker State
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You are leaving this excellent idea in the hands of someone with money no doubt but what do we call you now with this wonderful brainstorm? Crapper is already taken.
I'm just saying :laughing:
 
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