How to Help your Customer Choose a New Water Heater - Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum
CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY, IT'S FREE!

Go Back   Plumbing Zone - Professional Plumbers Forum > Professional Plumbers Forum > Featured Articles and Topics


Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By ShtRnsdownhill
  • 1 Post By Tango
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-11-2019, 11:37 AM   #1
Administrator
 
PlumbingZone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 66

View PlumbingZone's Photo Album My Photos
Default How to Help your Customer Choose a New Water Heater



Your customer might be facing a failed water heater, or they might just want to upgrade or modernize their home. If there’s currently no hot water in the home, it might be tempting for the customer to just get any water heater installed as quickly as possible; but if you guide them through their options, the customer will experience greater satisfaction in the long run.

Traditional or Tankless?

For many decades, there was only one type of water heater available, which stores hot water in a tank that’s kept heated until the water is needed. This type of heater might be better for a home that needs to restore hot water quickly, or a home that frequently experiences low water pressure. For smaller families, this type of heater might easily meet their water usage needs. Traditional heaters are often less expensive than tankless for a new unit.

Tankless heaters need less maintenance, but the process to install one for the first time might take some extra work. However, they can also save the homeowner money on energy costs by only heating the water as it’s used, instead of maintaining hot water continuously. They also have the benefit of never running out of hot water. For larger families, this might give them the opportunity to make sure everyone gets a hot shower in the morning. Tankless water heaters also tend to last longer, with an average life span of more than 20 years, rather than the 10-15 years expected of traditional heaters.

What Size Should the Heater Be?

Once you’ve decided on a heater type, the next most important (and often overlooked) question is what size the heater should be. The heater should be able to keep up with water usage at the most active times in the household. You’ll want to ask the customer a few questions to get a feel for their family’s needs.
  • How many people share the house?
  • How many showers are in the home? Will more than one shower be used at the same time?
  • Is there a bathtub in the home? How many gallons does it hold?
  • How many washing machines or dishwashers are in the house? Are they used at the same time, or when people are showering?
For a traditional heater, the most important factor is storage capacity. Sizes for a residential water heater can range from 40 to 100-gallon tanks. For most homes, a 40 or 50-gallon hot water tank will meet everyone’s needs.

A tankless heater will never run out of hot water, but the water flow may slow to just a trickle if there are too many demands on the heater. Many factors can influence the effectiveness of the heater, such as outside temperatures, flow rates and the number of devices used at any one time. It might be better to install a large, whole-house heater, or you might want to consider installing a few smaller units in the bathrooms and kitchen.

There’s No One Right Answer

In conclusion, the best water heater solution is going to vary for each home. Consider budget, family size, appliances, and lifestyle before making a recommendation. With your experienced advice, your customers will be sure to find the perfect appliance for their family’s needs.

What’s your favorite water heater setup? Do you think tankless is the wave of the future?

Name:  pz.png
Views: 61
Size:  2.7 KB
PlumbingZone is offline   Reply With Quote

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. PlumbingZone.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-16-2019, 10:15 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
skoronesa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,269

View skoronesa's Photo Album My Photos
Default

120 gallon Bock oil burner. End all be all.



Insulate the pipes and add a recirc. In the winter time you can use it to heat your home.
__________________
Want privacy from the diy/hacks? Too bad, the motherland has fallen, freedom is dead.


"I'd rather have Questions that can't be answered, then Answers that can't be questioned"
skoronesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 10:30 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 4,650

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

oil sucks...
MASTRPLUMB likes this.
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-16-2019, 07:13 PM   #4
Moderator Wizard
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Quebec
Posts: 4,153

View Tango's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShtRnsdownhill View Post
oil sucks...
No no no! Maybe for a water heater but for a furnace I disagree.

I heat my house with oil. Best thing in my opinion. Electricity is way more expensive and gas is up there too. My GF has ridiculous gas bill with all sort of fees, transport fees, just because fees, and fees even if you don't use gas for 6 months you still have to pay that fee.

Oil: I buy #2 instead of #1 in October where they add winter additives and where it's the cheapest of all year. I don't use it in the summer well I don't pay anything.
MASTRPLUMB likes this.
Tango is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 07:33 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
ShtRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 4,650

View ShtRnsdownhill's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
No no no! Maybe for a water heater but for a furnace I disagree.

I heat my house with oil. Best thing in my opinion. Electricity is way more expensive and gas is up there too. My GF has ridiculous gas bill with all sort of fees, transport fees, just because fees, and fees even if you don't use gas for 6 months you still have to pay that fee.

Oil: I buy #2 instead of #1 in October where they add winter additives and where it's the cheapest of all year. I don't use it in the summer well I don't pay anything.

EH...if you buy oil smart maybe its cheaper, but you have to look at more than just the price of the fuel..you have to look at maintenance, parts and service and the decrease in efficiency over time...gas for the most part cost nothing for maintenance as it doesnt need anything other than a quick vacuum of dust ..
I have done hundreds of oil to gas conversions but NEVER did a gas to oil conversion..that must say something...I say gas in the long run is cheaper than oil....
each year you have to have the oil boiler serviced , filter changed and maybe electrodes or other parts that wear, none for gas....
the only oil for residential is #2, commercial or industrial is different, but even there, many of the oil electric plants are going to gas for efficency and cleanliness...
you get a bad load of oil or the burner goes out of adjustment and you will burn through oil and have issues...

have you seen any tankless oil fired water heaters?
oil smells and is dirty, lots of soot even with new burners.....gas has too many pluses for me..and most people must feel the same as said before I have never done a gas to oil conversion..
__________________
You cant cure stupid, only kill it..
ShtRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 07:47 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
skoronesa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,269

View skoronesa's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Guys, it was a sarcastic response to another one of those stupid questions just designed to illicit responses from us which will attract diy'ers to the site.








.
__________________
Want privacy from the diy/hacks? Too bad, the motherland has fallen, freedom is dead.


"I'd rather have Questions that can't be answered, then Answers that can't be questioned"
skoronesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2019, 08:37 PM   #7
Moderator Wizard
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Quebec
Posts: 4,153

View Tango's Photo Album My Photos
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShtRnsdownhill View Post
EH...if you buy oil smart maybe its cheaper, but you have to look at more than just the price of the fuel..you have to look at maintenance, parts and service and the decrease in efficiency over time...gas for the most part cost nothing for maintenance as it doesnt need anything other than a quick vacuum of dust ..
I have done hundreds of oil to gas conversions but NEVER did a gas to oil conversion..that must say something...I say gas in the long run is cheaper than oil....
each year you have to have the oil boiler serviced , filter changed and maybe electrodes or other parts that wear, none for gas....
the only oil for residential is #2, commercial or industrial is different, but even there, many of the oil electric plants are going to gas for efficency and cleanliness...
you get a bad load of oil or the burner goes out of adjustment and you will burn through oil and have issues...

have you seen any tankless oil fired water heaters?
oil smells and is dirty, lots of soot even with new burners.....gas has too many pluses for me..and most people must feel the same as said before I have never done a gas to oil conversion..
Like I said here the gas bill are ridiculous. You don't use it you still pay fees. Without too much comparison I pay more than half of what electricity users pay! And we are probably the biggest supplier of cheap hydro electricity in North America.

I can't say anything about maintenance for other people as I do my own and learned it all myself. No one to show me and it wasn't easy at first to trouble shoot several issues at the same time without anyone giving me a straight answer.

If someone were to hire someone to do maintenance sure it would be more expensive. For me it cost less than 5$ for an oil filter every year and 5-7$ for a new nozzle every year. My furnace was in the house when I bought it and it's unknown the manufacturing date, early 90's I think.

If you don't specify the oil type in my area you'll be getting number 1 maybe #2 but they'll charge for #1. They'll refuel you every month and you pay a lot more in January. I fill her up in October and I used to be good all winter (800 liters) Now I need to refuel as I keep it warm because I'm home all the time as my own boss and to keep the cat warm.

Dirty : Not in my chimney, I bought a smoke tester, draft and adjust it till the paper has no soot marks. Maybe pollution wise.

Smell : My tank is outside and it doesn't smell fuels inside, only a little bit of smoke smell from the damper when it starts up but you have to be within 2 feet.

Maintenance : I did replace the pump, igniter and transformer but that's because they were 25 years old or more.

If I were to switch to gas, I would need a meter installed, plus a new furnace I can't even buy myself even though I'm a "qualified gas pipe fitter and gas tech #2" I would need a contractor gas licence to buy one. I'd have to pay someone I'm guessing maybe 12 000$. At that amount I will never break even.
Tango is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Our Pro Sites Network
ContractorTalk.com | DrywallTalk.com | ElectricianTalk.com | HVACSite.com | PaintTalk.com | RoofingTalk.com