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Old 02-21-2016, 01:08 AM   #1
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Default Figure fittings and side inlets

Hi, my question is related to dwv fitting usage. I was going through my cast iron fitting book today and realized I've never really understood what the "figure" fittings are. So for example, what's the difference between a Figure 5 and a double combo? Another one that confused me was the Figure 1, it's basically a double tapped san tee, but the sweep is closer to that of a double combo while still keeping the vent above the inlet of the arm of the fitting, the way a san tee does. So is that the point, they are just double fixture fittings that give better sweep than san tees but don't violate the code the way a vertical combo does?

I'm also confused by side inlet fittings. In general I've never used a side inlet fitting and have to admit I don't really understand what they're for. None of the side inlets seem to have any sweep to them, so I don't know where you use them other than venting. So for example, I like using low heels for my toilets, but can't really understand where you would ever use a 3" 1/4 bend with a 2" side inlet, unless it were on a vent stack. My pvc fitting catalog has a lot of side inlet fittings as well.

Does anyone have any experience using these exotic fittings?

Some examples:

https://m.ferguson.com/product/-2-in...FQ4zaQodPTQNhw

http://www.nibco.com/Fittings/Plasti...H-x-H-PVC-DWV/

http://www.amazon.com/Spears-Pipe-Fi.../dp/B00ALMQS0I

Thanks.
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Old 02-21-2016, 08:39 AM   #2
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The first pic of the cast fitting eliminates using a y and 45 s for drain, the middle pvc fitting is against code by me, and the last one you turn up so the 3 inch on the bull would goto the toilet and the side outlets to tub, shower or sink the top is vent and bottom to waste..they are handy for bathroom groups if the stack can go straight down, saves alot of fittings and looks cleaner in the rough in..
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Old 02-21-2016, 09:05 AM   #3
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I'm not sure if this is an odd copper fitting or normal reducing tee for copper but I think it looks funny because the 1 1/4" is up so high on the fitting and not centered like a normal tee. Yes I have a little bit of copper DWV in my house and so far is the only place I have seen it.
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Old 02-21-2016, 10:07 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dane View Post
I'm not sure if this is an odd copper fitting or normal reducing tee for copper but I think it looks funny because the 1 1/4" is up so high on the fitting and not centered like a normal tee. Yes I have a little bit of copper DWV in my house and so far is the only place I have seen it.
That's a heel 90 and is illegal around here.
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Old 02-21-2016, 10:49 AM   #5
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took some coffee but, we call the last fitting a " national" at least in my area, seems each region has their own names for stuff...
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:18 AM   #6
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Under the CPC (the code in Santa Rosa), the fig.5 is allowed as a back to back waste fitting. For example, in the vertical position, you could use it to drain back to back toilets.
The side inlet elbow is not listed by the UPC (CPC) and thus not allowed.
The side inlet tee is not approved for vertical wet venting by the UPC (CPC).
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:49 AM   #7
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Thanks everyone for the reply. Yeah for my area at least I don't think I could ever use the "heel 90" with side inlet. When you go through the Charlotte cast iron book, they'll have a heel 90, then they'll have a heel 90 where the inlet is just above the centerline, and they specify that being for "New Orleans code." Maybe that's just an old school term I don't understand but seems like the rules for these vary geographically.
Downhill, that's a good call on the second fitting, I wouldn't have thought to do that but seems like it would be perfectly legal. If the tub coming off of that 2" inlet was within 5' of the stack then it seems like the fitting is designed to let you share the 3" vent for both fixtures. It almost seems similar to a cast iron "starter fitting." I found this charolette catalog online last night and was really engrossed for a while, finally understood how you would put all these crazy looking fittings into use. http://www.charlottepipe.com/Documen...s/BR-CI-MS.pdf
I don't work on a lot of multi story buildings so probably won't ever use most of those fittings, but my new goal is to find an opportunity to use a figure 8 on the horizontal for back to back floor mount water closets, pretty slick.
Back to the cast iron figure 5...to me it doesn't seem legal to use that horizontal since it's not a true wye with 1/8 bend. But on the other hand it is legal to use on the vertical since unlike a wye with 1/8 bend the vent outlet does not wind up below the inlet arms. So it basically looks like a sanitary cross but with more sweep to the arm inlets. So I guess depending on the fixtures/situation it is just a better fitting to use than a double san tee? For example back to back water closets usually don't want you to use a sanitary cross. So the figure 5 gives you kind of a baffle between the two inlets without making the vent lower than the arms the way a double combo would. Or a 2" figure 5 might be a better choice for back to back 2" floor sinks, even though a 2" sanitary cross would be legal. Can anyone confirm that my thinking here is correct.
Thanks again for the replies, sorry if my posts are tldr.

Last edited by enjoytab; 02-21-2016 at 11:50 AM.. Reason: Spelling
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:55 AM   #8
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Thanks plumbus, so I guess that tub would need its own vent then if you used that fitting? I was still typing my overly long post when you replied, but we seem to be on similar pages using the figure 5 for back to back toilets.
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Old 02-21-2016, 11:55 AM   #9
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You are correct in your statement on the fig 5, it's for vertical use only.
A sanitary cross would not be legal in Santa Rosa. If it were to pass it would be due to your inspector being of the combination variety without thorough knowledge of the code.
Remember also that any offset from true vertical up to 45 (1/6th bend, 1/8th bend) is still considered vertical and any greater then 45 (1/6th bend, 1/5th bend) is considered horizontal.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:15 PM   #10
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Got it, and I see in the pvc fitting book that they call their version of a figure 5 a "double fixture fitting." Same shape. Double san tees only on a vent stack then. Thanks for clearing that up for me! I wish my code book had a little more info on specific fitting usage on dwv, it leaves you a bit wanting in that chapter.
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