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Old 07-22-2019, 12:46 AM   #11
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To correct Skoronesa,
all cables except #1 Marco, and # 2 small Pistol cables are Left hand wound,
the aforementioned cables are Right Hand Wound,
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Old 07-22-2019, 09:46 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MASTRPLUMB View Post
To correct Skoronesa,
all cables except #1 Marco, and # 2 small Pistol cables are Left hand wound,
the aforementioned cables are Right Hand Wound,
Sewer and Drain Cleaner National Sales Rep, and
35 yr Master Plumber & Drainman



My ridgid k-45af came with right hand wound cables. Electric eel also offers right hand cables.






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Old 07-22-2019, 09:09 PM   #13
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Just so we are clear, the correct way to drive a cable under normal circumstances(aka the correct way) is the opposite of it's twist. So if a cable has a left hand twist(counterclockwise) like electric eel(usually), marco, or general, than you need to run it clockwise. Other brands of cables have a right hand twist, like ridgid, and thus need to be run in the opposite direction.


Right hand cables spiral like a normal pipe thread. Left hand cables spiral the other way.


If you can't visualize this then get a piece of 3 strand twisted rope or some string and twist it different ways. One direction will uncoil(weaken) the fibers, the other will tighten(strengthen) them.


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Only referring to sectional cables and I understand what you're saying but I've ran my sectional cables for so long counter clockwise with no damage to them so I consider the rotation a non issue.
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Old 09-09-2019, 08:20 PM   #14
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wouldnt opposite of the twist unravel the cable sorta speaking?..if you went with the twist you would be winding the cable tighter...im pretty sure..






You took the words right out of my mouth. That's what I was thinking too.

I am not an expert drain cleaner. I do it, but I'm not to the expert level yet. But I'm all ears when you heavyweights start talking about LH and RH twist.

I have to plead ignorance about the whole RH and LH twist of the cable. I'm just happy to clear the stoppage and not get my cable stuck....LOL.
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Old 01-13-2020, 10:21 PM   #15
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I would think that Ridgid did this (left hand wound sectional cable) so the machine wouldn't get sucked in/pulled towards the cleanout from the winding of the cable.


It doesn't make much sense though having the cable wanting to come back out (because of the reverse winding) when wanting to go forward...
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Old 01-13-2020, 11:07 PM   #16
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I would think that Ridgid did this (left hand wound sectional cable) so the machine wouldn't get sucked in/pulled towards the cleanout from the winding of the cable.

It doesn't make much sense though having the cable wanting to come back out (because of the reverse winding) when wanting to go forward...



The cable wants to come back out when tightening because it straightens. When you are running a cable down a pipe, the longer it gets the more resistance to rotation it has and the parts of the cable toward you will go from being a straight piece to a helix/spiral inside the pipe. However, when this resistance gets high enough the outer core wraps more tightly causing the cable to once again straighten out and lengthen.


I know it sounds a bit confusing but that's the case. Of course it's less obvious when you hit something with a small(<40'ish) amount of cable out because it happens much more quickly and to a lesser extent. So if most of your jobs are in a city you may not notice this. Where I am I regularly run 75-95' to clear a line so this is much more pronounced.


Mind you all of what I just said is based on my 5/8" solid core cable on my 92/91 drum unit. For 3/4" solid cable which I also run this effect is a god bit smaller. I can not speak to how hollow core or sectional cable would act though I would guess it to be much the same to varying degrees.


There is no performance difference to left hand or right hand twist assuming you run it in the correct direction which causes the cable to tighten. Larger/stronger(3/4"+) cables will perform better running backwards than smaller cables. But you should really try to avoid running any solid core cable backwards. Sectional/hollow cables are another ball of wax I have little experience with.


Usually direct drive machines come with right hand cable while belt driven ones come with left hand cable. This is because in either case the electric motor spins the same way and is oriented shaft forward. Direct drive machines aren't totally direct drive, they have a set of gears to lower the speed and increase the torque which also has the effect of reversing the spin on the output. This causes them to need cables wound the opposite direction.











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